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14th Street White Way News 1931?- ? Huneke, publisher. image location
15 Minutes image location
Abend-Anzieger 1835-1901 The Abend Anzeiger, the second-oldest of our daily papers, is the successor of the Anzeiger des Westens, established in 1835 and for many years edited by Wm. Weber. Arthur Olshausen was for a time one of its owners, but the prestige of the paper must be ascribed to Henry Boernstein, who became its editor and proprietor in 1850. It image location
AbendPost und Tageblatt 1888-1898 image location
Abendschule 1854-1940 Die Abendschule, published since 1854, is probably the only German illustrated family and literary monthly published in the United States...This periodical belongs in the "popular literature class," containing stories, short papers, poems, and household, children's and humorous departments. It is generously illustrated and has a large circulation. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901).   image location
Abendstunde 1946 (“Evening Hour”) semi-weekly. H.H. Wernecke, editor. image location
Abendzeitung 1867-1868 (“Evening News”) Merged with Die Neue Welt.    image location
Achieve 1998- 1999 “Going for the good life.” Jenise Jacques, editor; Rick Viehland, publisher. image location
Ad Mission 1946 ​Women’s Ad Club News image location
Ad Writer 1897- 1903 H.H. Paramore, editor. Ad-Sense Publishing Company. Monthly. image location
Add One 1979- 1980 AddOne Becomes Latest Area Magazine A bi-weekly publication called Add One is the newest addition to the local journalism scene. Add One is published by Jim Landers, formerly a reporter at the Alton Telegraph, and Judy Landers, formerly a photographer and reporter on the O’Fallon, Ill. Progress. Add One’s first issue included a lengthy analysis of the St. Louis image location
The Advance 1881?-1915 Black Weekly. Phillip H. Murray, editor. Var.: St. Louis Advance image location
Advance Advocate 1903- 1906 Published by the International Brotherhood of Maintenance-of-Way Employes. J.E. Mulkey, editor and manager. image location
The Advertiser 1861 image location
The Advertiser 1946 image location
The Advertiser 1911?- 1921? ​   image location
Adviser Weekly 1934 Jno. Congo, editor/publisher. Free weekly Negro paper. image location
Advocate 1824- 1825 In the issue of this paper [Missouri Gazette] of December 24, 1824, a prospectus was printed which announced that the Gazette had been transferred to Keemle and Foreman, and would be published as the Missouri Advocate.On February 15, 1825, the Advocate informed its readers that the paper “will in future, be issued in the city of St. Louis. Our subscribers image location
Aero 1910- 1912 "The first weekly aeronautic publication in America. A newspaper originated and published to further the objects and purposes of incorporated aeronautic organizations of scientific purpose for the advancement of the industry and the promulgation of the news of aerial achievement." E. Percy Noel, Editor. image location
The Age 1847 Literary journal. “The Age and Body of Time” Edited by the “Association of Gentlemen.” image location
Age of Steel 1880- 1901 The Age of Steel dates back to The Mississippi Handels Zeitung​ (The Journal of Commerce) -A German weekly founded in 1857, and which, in 1861, became the English Journal of Commerce. Robert M. Widmar, who was born in Dresden, Germany, was the published of the Zeitung; he died in 1866 and The Journal passed into the hands of Wolcott & Hume. In 1878 it became image location
Airport News 1929 Weekly. C.D. Brown & Son, publisher. image location
The Ajax 1916- 1949? A monthly magazine for advanced thinkers and lovers of literature. Exponent of truth and proponent of the fine arts. An organ of classicism, spirit of romanticism, non-impressionistic. C. Victor Stahl, founder.  image location
Alienist and Neurologist 1880- 1920 Quarterly journal of scientific, clinical and forensic psychiatry and neurology. image location
Alive 2002- 2015 ALIVE Media Group was founded in October 2002 with the launch of ALIVE Magazine. Started by St. Louis entrepreneurs, the publication aimed to fill a gap in the media landscape, which lacked a magazine providing relevant lifestyle, fashion and culture content to local readers. image location
All the Art 2015- Quarterly arts magazine founded by Sarah Griesbach and Amy Reidel. image location
Allied Arts In Greater St. Louis 1936- 1937 Published by the Allied Arts Editorial Board image location
Altenheim Nachrichten 1906? image location
Alton American 1833- ? The Alton American was a five column paper established in Alton November 8th, 1833. Its founder, J.S. Buchanan, was a writer of some merit. It was devoted to the agricultural, mechanical and mercantile interests of Lower Alton and vicinity. It had a brief existence. The paper was a monthly publication printed at Alton by Messrs Braley & Parks, and image location
Alton Banner 1866- 1913 This German paper based in Alton, was established in May, 1866, by the Pfeiffer brothers. In October of the same year, John Mudd, a practical printer, purchased the paper and continued the publication until October 1st, 1868. Then the leaders of the Republican party in Alton bought the Banner and put Mr. V. Walter in charge of it as image location
Alton Commercial Gazette 1839- 1840 Founded by Samuel S. Brooks and John H. Pettit March 12th, 1839, it was an ably conducted journal, Democratic in politics. It suspended publication in March, 1840, but was revived in May of the same year and did good service in the presidential campaign, at the close of which it again suspended. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois by W.R. image location
Alton Daily Courier 1852- 1860? Established by George T. Brown, James D. Gamble and John Fitch on 6/4/1852. In January, 1860, ownership was transferred to S.V. Crossman and B.J.F. Hanna. image location
Alton Daily Republican 1901 Owner John D. McAdams merged with Alton Telegraph. image location
Alton Daily Times 1909- 1924 E.E. Campbell and W.H. Murphy, founders. Bought out by the Alton Evening Telegraph 12/31/1924. image location
Alton Democrat 1875- ? In January, 1875, J.N. Shoemaker issued the first number of the Alton Democrat. The leading organ of the Democratic party in southern Illinois was founded by James N. Shoemaker and Hugh E. Bayle. It was a weekly. During the first year, E.J. Bronson was connected with its publication. On the 17th of June, 1876, the daily edition was commenced. image location
Alton Democratic Union 1846 Published by Dumas & Pritchard.  image location
Alton Journal 1906- 1913 German-language paper founded by W.A. Bode. Publication was suspended in 1913 when he became ill. image location
Alton Monitor 1848 On the 23rd of June, 1848, the name of the Protestant Monitor was changed to the Alton Monitor with its religious mantle exchanged for that of Democracy, and the names of Lewis Cass and William O. Butler [were] nailed to the mast-head as its candidates for the Presidency and Vice Presidency. [John] McPike withdrew from the paper. It was image location
Alton National Democrat 1854- 1865, 1866- 1888 Established by George Thompson. John Fitch was the first editor. Thompson withdrew from ownership in 1855, and the next year, John and T.S. Fitch, expanded the paper to both daily and weekend editions. In 1862, William T. Dowdall took over management. He sold the paper to John C. Dobelbower 12/1/1864. On 2/1/1865 fire destroyed the paper’s offices and publication stopped image location
Alton Observer 1836- 1838 Formerly The Observer. Elijah Lovejoy, founder. The press was destroyed by a mob 8/21/1837. The paper was then published in Cincinnati and sent back to Alton for distribution. Publication ceased in April of 1838. image location
Alton Republican 1895- 1905 The original paper was founded by the Lend A Hand Society, in conjunction with Shurtleff College. On 8/16/1902, John D. McAdams, originally a reporter at the paper’s outset, along with D.R. Sparks and Eugene Gadkens, incorporated the Republican Publishing Company, which was listed as the paper’s owner. The paper consolidated with the Alton Evening Telegraph in 1905. image location
Alton Sentinel Democrat 1889- 1911 In 1910, paper was bought by J.R. Finnel, O.B. Rynders and John McKeon. They suspended publication the following year. image location
Alton Spectator 1832- 1839 O.M. Adams & Edward Breath, two enterprising young men of Alton, started a newspaper at Upper Alton called the Alton Spectator. The first number made its appearance January 21st, 1832. The firm of Adams & Breath was dissolved April 20th of the same year. On the 20th of October, 1832, the office of the Spectator was removed from Upper Alton to Alton image location
Alton Telegraph 1836- Through Flood and Fire By Joseph J. Brongoole Through flood and fire – four words might tell the story of the Telegraph’s homes through the century. And, after 100 years, the Telegraph is back in the neighborhood in which the newspaper started. On January 15, 1835 – in a pioneer frontier settlement and in an age that knew no image location
Alton Telegraph & Democratic Review 1841- 1853 Changed to a tri-weekly in 1850 and a daily in 1852. Under the ownership of John Balhaiche & Co., the name was changed to the Alton Telegraph & Madison County Record in 1853. image location
Alton Telegraph & Madison County Record 1853- 1855 E.L. Baker & Co., bought the paper in 1854 when Lawson Parks bought out Bailhaiche’s interest.  image location
Alton Weekly Courier 1852- 1859 George T. Brown, editor/proprietor image location
Alton Western Argus 1845 Edward F. Fletcher, publisher. Became Alton Democratic Union. image location
The Altonian 1838 No. 1, of Vol. 1 made its appearance April 6, 1838. L.A. Parks and Edmund Breath were the editors and publishers. It was a four (wide) column folio, Whig in politics, and supported Henry Clay for the presidency. In the third number the editors say,"We feel highly flattered at the reception our paper meets with, but the mere approval image location
The Altruist 1868- 1917 The Altruist was a monthly paper, partly in phonetic spelling, and “Devoted to Common Property, United Labor, Mutual Assistance, and Equal Rights” for all. It was the organ of the Altruist Community, whose members hold all their property in common and live and work together in a permanent home for their mutual enjoyment, assistance and support. It was published by Alcander image location
America At Work 1919- 1924 Paul Brown, editor/publisher. Became Executive's Magazine. image location
The American 1895- 1901? Paul Brown, editor/publisher. image location
The American 1904- ? Monthly. The American Publishing CompanyThe American (1904) Announcement             The American will be made what its name indicates. The articles published will be accepted because of their bearing on some basic principle or on some organic policy affecting Government.              The name of the writer will influence accepting contents less than will the worth of what is written. The ideas image location
American Aeronaut 1907- 1908 T.R. MacMechen, editor; American Aeronaut Publishing Company. First issues had the title American Aeronaut and Aerostatist. image location
American Agent & Broker 1929- Commerce Publishing image location
American Baptist 1875- 1893? D.B. Ray, editor and proprietor. The Baptist Flag is a large eight-page weekly, religious, devotional, doctrinal, historical newspaper, established in 1875, and for its age has the largest circulation of any Baptist Paper in America. Var.: American Baptist Flag image location
American Baptist Flag 1880-1895? The original title was the Baptist Battle Flag, but in 1880 the name was changed (to The American Baptist Flag). The Baptist Flag claims the largest circulation of any paper of its denomination West of the Mississippi. Its peculiar feature is polemic theology and church history. (From the History of St. Louis City and County by John Thomas Scharf, image location
American Bottom Gazette 1841- 1844 The first newspaper established in the City of East St. Louis, then known as “Illinois Town,” was the American Bottom Gazette. There was no paper after its demise until 1865. (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois by Brink, McDonough & Co. 1881). Sumrix and Jarrott, publishers. Newspaper’s offices were destroyed by a flood. image location
American Bulletin 1842- 1843 V. Ellis, editor and proprietor.   “The perpetuation of American Freedom is our object – American Rights our motto – and the American Party our cognomen.” image location
American Catholic 1893- 1897 ​Monthly, formerly St. Mary’s Mission Register, edited and published by Rev. William H. Tompkins. image location
American Celt 1883- 1894 Charles O'Brien issued The American Celt during some ten years, with occasional interruptions, in the [eighteen] eighties and nineties. It expired in 1894. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
American Eagle 1894-1905 African-American weekly. Published by R.A. Hudlin. image location
The American Entomologist 1868- 1870?, 1880 Illustrated magazine of popular and practical entomology.  R.P. Studley & Co., publisher; B.D. Walsh & C.V. Riley, editors. image location
American Family Magazine 1905- 1906 Also: Myerson's American Family Magazine. Samuel F. Myerson. image location
American Hotel Reporter 1878 ​Only two issues were published. image location
American Hungarian Review 1963- 1973 Quarterely. Leslie Konnyu, editor/publisher. Cooperative of American Hungarian writers. image location
American Illustrated Methodist Magazine 1901 Methodist Magazine Publishing Company image location
American Jew 1914- Jacques Back, editor/publisher. Weekly. image location
The American Journal of Dermatology 1895 The American Journal of Dermatology, monthly, takes first rank as the only publication of note in America on the lines of cutaneous medicine, venereal diseases, and genito-urinary surgery. It was founded in 1895, by Dr. S.C. Martin. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri edited by Howard L. Conard, 1901). image location
American Journal of Education 1867- 1920 J.B. Merwin established The American Journal of Education in 1867. He was connected with Henry Barnard and the great educator, Horace Mann, in Massachusetts and Connecticut in establishing the school systems of those states. He was editor of The American Journal until 1893. Professor W.M. Bryant, LL.D., was its editor in 1894 and 1895, followed by J.G. Reynolds. The paper was issued monthly. image location
American Journal of Ophthalmology 1884- 1917 Moved to Chicago [The] acknowledged national authority on the department of medical science to which it is devoted. It was founded in 1884...by Dr. Adolf Alt. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri edited by Howard L. Conard, 1901). image location
American Journal of Surgery and Gynaecology 1889- 1900 The American Journal of Surgery and Gynecology was founded in 1889, by the American Journal Publishing Company. Emory Lanphear, M.D., was editor for four years, and was succeeded by H.E. Pearse, M.D., of Kansas City, who served for two years. L.A. Schaeffer, M.D., also of Kansas City, followed for one year. In 1895 Dr. Lanphear resumed the editorial management...This Journal stands alone in image location
American Journal of Syphilis 1917- 1933 Quarterly devoted to the study and prevention of syphilis. Drs. Loyd Thompson and William Deaderick, editors.  Became American Journal of Syphilis, Gonorrhea and Venereal Diseases. image location
American Journal of Syphilis, Gonorrhea and Venereal Diseases 1934- 1954 image location
American Journalist 1883- 1885 The American Journalist was devoted to the interests of newspapers and public writers. The first number appeared in September, 1883, and the last about a year later. It was published by the American Journalist Publishing Company, of which R.P. Yorkston was the president. It was a twenty-four page, three-column monthly, with a colored cover, and contained much valuable information for newspaper image location
American Law Review 1866- 1929 Founded in Boston. Moved to St. Louis in 1882 when it was sold to Review Publishing Company. In 1883, the Southern Law Review, and in 1885, the Western Jurist were consolidated with it. The American Law Review is a bi-monthly magazine of 160 pages, devoted to the law. It contains leading articles by eminent legal writers on topics of interest and value to the bench image location
American Lumberman 1899- ? Journal of Commerce Company, publisher; W.A. Barnes, managing editor. Var: St. Louis Lumberman. Became Lumber. image location
American Medical Journal 1873- The American Medical Journal, monthly, was founded in 1873, by Dr. John W. Thrailkill, in the interest of eclectic medicine and surgery. At a later day the Journal passed into the hands of Dr. George C. Pitzer. In 1887 it was bought by Dr. E. Younkin, who conducted it until October, 1898, when he sold it to Dr. M.M. Hamlin. In its image location
American Midwife 1895- 1896 Monthly. Dr. A.A. Henske and Dr. Henry H. Summa, editors/ publishers. image location
American Monitor 1891- "A strictly American newspaper, devoted to maintaining true Americanism."  The American Monitor Publishing Company. image location
American Nationalist 1882- 1884 The American Nationalist, a monthly paper, the organ of the National Americans, and the temperance cause, was issued in July, 1882, by R.H. Robbins, who seems to have had a faculty for starting short-lived papers equal only to Charles Keemle's. In 1883 it became a weekly, and the following year ceased to exist. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander image location
American Paint and Oil Dealer 1908- 1952 Allen W. Clark, editor/publisher. image location
American Painter & Decorator 1924-1963 Monthly published by the American Paint Journal Company. image location
American School and College Journal 1891- 1896 Monthly. H.H. Stendel, editor/ publisher. image location
American Surgery and Gynecology 1901- 1905 American Journal Publishing Company. image location
American Trade Journal and Grain Review 1883- 1885? In September, 1881, McClelland, Winter & McClelland established the Grain Review. The senior member of the firm was T.L. McClelland, formerly of the Pittsburgh Evening Chronicle. This is believed to be the only paper in the country exclusively devoted to the grain and elevator interests, and its specialty is the publication of statistics on the subject from the great image location
American Tribune 1883-1887? The American Tribune was begun on March 8, 1883, and published irregularly during the middle part of the [eighteen] eighties by L.U. Reavis. It was a weekly, containing papers on current topics and selections from the Eastern press. Reavis was an enthusiastic admirer of Horace Greeley, and carried his admiration even to the extent of imitating his slovenly appearance. With his image location
American Truck Farmer 1903?- 1904? An illustrated monthly magazine for progressive fruit and vegetable growers. William Theodore Burkam, editor. image location
American Vanguard 1923- ? “Blind as a bat to everything but right”  Formerly the National Rip-Saw.  Kate Richards O’Hare, editor. image location
American Wheelman 1885- ? Bicycling publication image location
American Woman’s Review 1904- 1911 Formerly Chaperone. Annie L. Y. Orff, editor. Issued every month in the interest of the American woman and the American home. image location
American Working Girl 1899 “A family journal devoted to the interests of the female wage-earners of America”  B.A. Killoran, editor; Glass and Killoran, publishers. image location
American X-Ray Journal 1895- The American X-Ray Journal, monthly, by the X-Ray Publishing Company, was founded in 1895 by Heber Robarts, M.D., M.E., member of the Roentgen Society of London. The purpose is to foster the application of the new science, and for the physical improvement of man. It is the only journal in the world devoted to the science of X-radiance, all other publications, image location
American Yeoman 1894- 1900? S.H. Burt, publisher. Devoted to all matters pertaining to the home, farm, stock, poultry, bees, orchard, etc., together with the best of original and selected miscellany. image location
Amerika 1872-1924 The Amerika came into existence through an organization known as the German Literary Society with several hundred members. It was started in 1872 under the editorial charge of Anthony Hellmich. Dr. Edward Preuss succeeded Mr. Hellmich, and under his able direction the paper achieved marked success. The Amerika had its own field. It devoted considerable attention to religious matters image location
Amerika und Herold des Glaubens 1921- 1924 Papers merged. image location
Ancient Wisdom 1935- 1955? ​Founded by L.W. Rogers. A journal of the Theosophical Society. image location
Annals of Ophthalmology 1899- H.V. Wurdemann, editor; Jones A. Parker, publisher. image location
Annals of Ophthalmology, Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology 1892- 1898 The Annals of Ophthalmology, Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology,  a quarterly journal and review of the sciences named in its title, was instituted in 1892 by Dr. James Pleasant Parker. It represents his most important and all-absorbing effort through many years, and is an enduring monument to his memory. In 1896 Dr. Parker died, and the conduct of the Annals was successfully assumed image location
Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology 1899- Dr. H.V. Wurdemann, managing editor; Jones H. Parker, publisher. image location
Antipfaff 1842- 1845 In 1842 there appeared a sheet with the title Antipfaff (Antipriest). It was edited by Heinrich Koch, a born agitator, who was the first in St. Louis to preach communism. He left St. Louis and settled in a communist colony, and in 1845 his paper was merged into the Vorwaerts, which managed to live only about a year. (From image location
Anzeiger des Westens 1835- 1912? [Henry] Boernstein’s Anzeiger des Westens for a time towered above the half-dozen German newspapers in St. Louis, thanks to editors like Charles Bernays and Carl Daenzer. But in 1857, Daenzer founded the Westliche Post, and it soon provided opposition for the older paper. The Anzeiger suspended publication when Boernstein and many of its employees went to war, but Daenzer image location
Appell 1890? ​Strike publication image location
Apropos 1921- Magazine of Automobile Club of Missouri. Sam Hellman, editor. image location
Arbeiter-Zeitung 1898-1910, 1912-1931 (“Workers’ Newspaper”) Socialist. G.A. Koehn, editor; Cooperative Commonwealth Association, publisher. image location
Arch City Chronicle 2001- 2007 Covering the people and politics of St. Louis. Dave Drebes, editor/publisher. image location
Architecture and Decoration 1894- 1895 Monthly edited by C.B. Lakin. image location
Archives of Dentistry 1883?- 1890 Owned by J.H. Chambers & Co,. edited by Dr. Spaulding, who was succeeded by Dr. Harper. It was sold to the Missouri Dental Association, which suspended publication in 1890. image location
The Argus ?- 1852 In 1852(?), owner William McKee merged the paper with The Signal to form The Democrat. image location
The Argus 1877- 1921 Based in Clayton. Merged with St. Louis County Sentinel 1/7/1921. image location
Ariel 1842- 1843? Charles A. Peck & Co. publishers image location
Art and Music 1881- 1882 This illustrated monthly, published by  H.A. Rothermel, was devoted more largely to music than art, and possessed considerable ability. Its contributors were principally from St. Louis. After one year the publication office was removed to Chicago. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
Art Review 1905- 1923? Arthur A. Kocian, Publisher;  James Irving Crabbe, Editor image location
Art Spirit Magazine 1914- 1924? Serving as the bulletin of the St. Louis Art League and allied interests, for community advancement, social and industrial, through the love of beauty. F.E.A. Curley, editor-in-chief. image location
Art Studies From the Nude 1895 image location
Art World 1931- 1933 Published by the Art World Editorial Board. Paul Benjamin Corr, editor. "Art World admittedly is not a pretentious periodical. Its publishers believe it will grow, but will not shorten its life by expanding prematurely. Such a policy would leave the fine arts without a regular publication in St. Louis. Your subscription is sought to place it on a sounder, image location
The Arts of St. Louis 1979- 1981 The Arts Wrestles with Financial TroublesBy George Palmer             The Arts of St. Louis, a monthly publication devoted to the visual and performing arts in St. Louis, has been in deep financial trouble since June. At this writing it is uncertain what kind of backing publisher John Fitz-Gerald can put together to keep the paper afloat.             Fitz-Gerald began printing image location
Arts Start 1978- 1985 John Fitz-Gerald, publisher. Distributed free to St. Louis schools image location
As You Like It 1890- 1891 “A paper with modern ideas and no fads.” image location
Aspect 1991- ? AspectBy Thomas Crone             …Though the new magazine has some aspects of other [alternative] publications – chiefly the ability to offer writing slots to freelancers otherwise shut out of the market – it is in some ways miles ahead of the others, even with only one issue to compare. The graphics and layout are far superior; a staff, including an image location
At Home 1872 At Home, volume I, number I, was issued in December, 1872, by Conkling Bros. It was a twenty-four page, three-column monthly, illustrated with stock and English cuts; short selected articles formed the bulk of its contents. Only a few numbers were issued. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
Atlantis 1845 Issued by Cormany and Benckendorf. It consisted of literature and family reading and was published semi-monthly. image location
Atlas of Dermatology 1895- 1897 Dr. A.H. Ohman-Dumesnil, editor/publisher. Monthly. image location
Attack 1950- ? Christian National Party image location
Auto Club News 1915- 1959 Published by the Automobile Club of Missouri. image location
The Auto Crank 1905- ? Devoted to owners of automobiles, motor cycles and motor vehicles. Auto Crank Publishing Company. N.T. Gutelius, editor, Became Auto Review. image location
The Auto Review 1988- Quarterly. Editor/Publisher Jim Schild. "I want this to be a magazine for everyone who likes cars." "You will notice on the masthead of this )premier) issue that the Volume is XVI. This is the continuation of the last published issue of The Auto Review of December, 1923." image location
Auto Review 1905- 1923 Quarterly. Official publication of  the St. Louis Automobile Manufacturers; and Dealers' Association. Devoted to owners and manufacturers of automobiles, motor cycles and motor vehicles. image location
Avant Coureur 1936- 1939 Gregory Lucy, editor/publisher. image location
Backward Glance 1969- 1970 image location
Baden News 1927?- 1941? H.E. Huneke, publisher. image location
Baden News-Press 1948- 1980 W. G. Schmegel, publisher. image location
Baden-Jennings Community News 1941 H.E. Huneke, publisher. Became North St. Louis Community News. image location
Bank Note Reporter and Counterfeit Detector 1857 image location
Banner of the Cross 1880- 1881 Name changed from The Little Episcopalian in October, 1880, the paper was a monthly edited and published by Dr. A.M. Powell in Collinsville. Publication under the new name continued until December 1881.  (From The History of Madison County, Illinois by W.R. Brink & Co. 1882). image location
Baptist Battle Flag 1875- 1880 Begun in January, 1875 by Rev. D.B. Ray. Name changed to American Baptist Flag in 1880. image location
Baptist Record 1867- 1903? image location
Bargain Counter News 1915- 1916 Monthly. Midland Publishing Company. George A. Nichols, editor. image location
Barnburner 1848- 1850 Antipathy to slavery was by no means confined to St. Louis newspaper men of northern birth. Francis P. Blair and B. Gratz Brown were Kentuckians. William McKee was from New York. He was a printer. He believed in emancipation so strongly that he published from his job office a paper which he called the Barnburner. Francis P. Blair supplied image location
Barnum's Midland Farmer 1898- 1914? Semi-monthly published by Barnum Midland Farmer Company. W.M. Barnum, editor. image location
Base Line 1976- Bi-weekly covering baseball from the perspective of the fans seeking in-depth, quality analysis. Larry Miller, publisher. image location
Beacon 1895 Sixteen-page monthly literary paper. H.W. Becker, publisher; Cortez A. Kitchen, editor. image location
Beautiful Homes Magazine 1908- 1911 Being the national magazine of home improvement published monthly by the Lewis Publishing Company. Hugh Taylor, editor. image location
The Beer News 1933 ​Asa Goodwin and H.G. Heitzeberg, publishers image location
Behind the Bars 2010- Eddy Tauk, publisher. image location
Bellefontaine News 1931- 1941 image location
Belleville Advocate 1839- 1880 This paper was, with but few slight intermissions, regularly issued from its first number on March 27th, 1840 (sic). It is credited with being the first “permanent” newspaper in St. Clair County. James L. Boyd and John T.C. Clark were the first editors and publishers. It was printed in a building on the corner of Main and High streets image location
Belleville Banner 1859 The Belleville Banner, a Democratic paper with a conciliatory and reformatory mission, made its greeting bow to an unappreciative world September 1, 1859. It was a six-column folio, edited and published by H.L. Davidson. It made no great impression on the town and was short-lived. (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois by Brink, McDonough & Co. 1881). image location
Belleville Beobachter 1844 Belleville Beobachter            The Belleville Beobachter, the second German paper in the State of Illinois, was started in 1844 by Theodore Engelmann, who at that time was Deputy Circuit Clerk. During the same year he was elected Circuit Clerk. Not having time to attend to his paper, he sold the office to his foreman Bartholomew Hauck, who moved the office to image location
Belleville Daily Advocate 1854- 1972 image location
Belleville Daily News 1883- ? image location
Belleville Daily Times 1879- 1880 In the summer of 1879, G.F. Kimball returned to Belleville. In Feb., 1880, he issued the first number of the Daily Times. It was suspended in May, 1880. (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois by Brink, McDonough & Co. 1881). image location
The Belleville Democrat 1857- 1880 The paper was established in 1857 by Messrs. Boyakin and H.L. Fleming as publishers. In 1859 it passed into the hands of Messrs. Stuart and Schoupe, who continued the publication until November, 1860, when G.A. Harvey became publisher. He conducted the paper with great success until August, 1863, when it was purchased by Messrs. Denlinger and Russell. In January, image location
The Belleville Eagle 1854- ? The Eagle made its first appearance February 13, 1854, under the management of Messrs. J. M. Bevirt & W. E. Shoupe, publishers, two young printers of practically no editorial experience. Governor John Reynolds edited it for a short time. It was at first a daily paper but soon was changed to a weekly and renamed the St. Clair Tribune. “The image location
Belleville Independent 1876 Belleville Independent            In June, 1876, George Auerswald commenced the publication of the Belleville Independent, which was published for several months and then suspended.             (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois). image location
Belleville Morning Record 1912?-1915? George Meyer, publisher. image location
Belleville News-Democrat 1883- Belleville News-Democrat Short History            The Belleville News-Democrat was founded in 1858. In 1883, the Weekly Democrat merged with the Belleville News and has carried the name Belleville News-Democrat ever since.             Ownership of the News-Democrat changed often during the latter half of the 19th century, but publishing never ceased. In 1891, Fred J. Kern purchased the business and held the image location
Belleville Republican 1879- 1884? The Belleville Republican             It was founded Feb. 28, 1879, by Dr. T.W. Eckert, who had, for a number of years been connected with the Journal in Lebanon. He continued the paper as sole editor and proprietor until July 4th of the same year, when he sold a third interest to G.F. Kimball, and a third to S.C. Mace. The image location
Belleville Sun 1851 In 1851, Edward H. Fleming returned to Belleville from California and started the Belleville Sun. Thirty-six numbers were issued before it was consolidated with the Advocate, with a partnership formed under the name of Fleming and Niles, with Judge Nathaniel Niles as editor and Fleming as foreman. (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois by Brink, McDonough & image location
Belleville Times 1847- 1852 Prospectus of the Belleville Times The subscribers propose to publish a weekly newspaper at Belleville, Illinois, (to take the place of the St. Clair Banner) under the title of the Belleville Times: The first number to be issued on Friday, the 24th instant. The “Times” is to be a Democratic paper, and will yield a temperate but firm support image location
Belleville Volksblatt 1860- 1872 Dr. F. Wenzel originally established the Volksblatt, a German paper, Feb. 23, 1856. He continued [as] editor and publisher from Feb. 23, 1856, to Sept. 12, 1857, when he sold the paper to Franz Grimm, who in March, 1858, consolidated it with the Zeitung. After Bartholomew Hauck sold the Zeitung to Mr. Rupp, his son Louis, who was a printer, image location
Belleville Weekly Democrat 1858- 1883           The Rev. Williamson Franklin Boyakin, a Baptist preacher who came to Belleville in the 1840s, first published the Belleville Weekly Democrat on Jan. 16, 1858. His political paper advocated allowing new states joining the union to decide themselves whether to be slave or free.Boyakin left in the early 1860s. Eventually known as the “fighting parson” for his valor in image location
Belleville Weekly Times 1879- 1880 In the summer of 1879, G.F. Kimball returned to Belleville. On the 27th of November he issued the first number of the Weekly Times. It was suspended the following May. (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois by Brink, McDonough & Co. 1881). image location
Belleville Zeitung 1849- 1877, 1890- 1893 On January 11th, 1849, the first issue of the Zeitung was made. The paper was a five column quarto. On August 23, 1849, the paper was enlarged about one-third, and up to 1850 it dealt exclusively with national issues. In the spring of that year a local column was introduced. The Zeitung was owned by Bartholomew Hauck. Theodore Englemann, image location
Belleviller Post 1884- 1893 The first issue appeared August 27, 1884. The paper was absorbed by the Zeitung Jan. 18, 1893. image location
Belleviller Post und Zeitung 1893- 1922? Created after merger Jan. 18, 1893. George Semmelroth, editor/publisher. Post and Zeitung Publishing Company. image location
Belleviller Volksblatt 1856- 1858 Dr. F. Wenzel established the Volksblatt, a German paper, Feb. 23, 1856. In his salutatory, he set forth the mission of the paper: that the interests of the farming population would have his first and principal attention.  “The farmer is truly the free man in this Republic. Free from corruption and unacquainted with political wire-pulling and bar room diplomacy, image location
Better Farm Equipment & Methods 1928-1944 Midland Publishing Co. Became Better Farming Methods. image location
Better Farming Methods 1944 Midland Publishing Co. image location
Bingo Operator 1982 John Tuchschmidt, publisher. Monthly image location
The Blade 1915- 1916 image location
Blaetter und Bluetten 1896- 1918 Published by Der Abendschule. Short stories and articles of family interest. image location
Boletin Comercial 1898- Spanish, semi-monthly. James Arbuckle, editor/publisher image location
Book & Author 1984 Thomas Conway, publisher image location
Book News 1888- 1918 Trade publication. image location
Book-Keeper's Bulletin 1901- 1907 The Office Magazine. Bulletin Publishing Company, Charles A. Sweetland, editor. image location
The Bowler 1908- 1912 Weekly. D.J. Sweeney, editor/publisher. image location
Bowling Review 1988 Hansen Publishing Co. Became St. Louis Bowling Review. image location
Brauer Zeitung 1894- 1902 (“Brewers’ Newspaper”) Weekly German labor publication. L.L. Franz, editor/E. Kurzenknabe, publisher. (organ of the brewery workers union, which was dominated by Socialists) image location
Bread and Votes 1917 Socialist Party campaign paper image location
The Breeze 1884 Weekly. Breeze Publishing Company image location
Brennan's Monthly 1903- 1913 Variety magazine published by Brennan's stores. image location
The Brentwood Scope 1950- 1974? Weeden T. Gray, editor/publisher. Var.: The Scope  image location
Brewer's Art 1901- 1926? C.A. Nowak, editor/publisher image location
Bridge 1973? Formerly The St. Louis Outlaw image location
Bridgemen's Magazine 1901- 1955? Harry Jones, editor. International Association of Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers. Var: Bridge Men's Magazine image location
Bucherfreund 1899- 1902 German image location
The Bugle 1945- 1996 Taps For Bugle By Don Corrigan             After more than 51 years of publication, the weekly St. Louis Bugle hit the streets with its last edition on July 3, 1996. Touting itself as “The World’s Softest Newspaper,” the Bugle shunned hard news and was perpetually the joker in newsprint.             One of the Bugle’s many mottos was: “We’re not image location
Builder 1902- 1906 Publication of the Master Builders Association of St. Louis. St. Louis Builders' Publishing Company. Formerly St. Louis Builder. Became Realty Record and Builder. image location
The Building Trades Journal 1883- 1892? A semi-monthly journal devoted to the building trades and allied interests of the West and Southwest. J.F. Mitchim, editor.  Pierce Brothers Publishing. image location
The Bulletin 1838- 1861 Daily. Tracey & Swift publishers.  Var.: Daily Bulletin image location
Bulletin of Commerce 1874- 1906 Briggs & Co, publishers/George W. Briggs, editor. image location
Bulletin of Commerce 1908 William Radford, editor. Weekly. image location
Bulletin of Photography 1888- 1910 Formerly St. Louis and Canadian Photographer. image location
The Butcher 1883- 1892 Name changed to The Butchers' and Packers' Magazine. image location
Butchers and Packers Magazine 1892- 1901? ​ John H. Schofield, editor/publisher. Monthly, published in the interests of retail butchers; official organ of the National Retail Butchers' Protective Association. image location
Cadence 1940- 1941 A semi-annual publication of verse and verse appreciation. image location
The Call 1884- 1890 Var. Morning Call image location
The Call 1935- 1942 Newspaper serving the Negro community. Chester A. Franklin, editor; St. Louis Call Publishing Company. image location
Camp Lincoln News 1932? J.T, Westermeier, editor. Jefferson Barracks paper. image location
Canteen News 1939?- 1973 Serving Canteen Township, St. Clair County, Illinois. image location
Carondelet Advertiser 1880 image location
Carondelet New Era 1859- 1860 ​  Weekly. James M. Loughborough, publisher. image location
Carondelet News 1900- 1935 Carondelet Printing and Publishing Company, M.L. Gongwer, president; B.F. Gilbreath, editor. image location
Carondelet Progress 1891- 1899 A. H. Jung, publisher. “Devoted to the Interest and Welfare of South St. Louis and St. Louis County.” Became the South St. Louis Progress. image location
The Carondelet Review 1869- 1876 Weekly. R.H. Robbins, publisher. image location
Carry On 1921 Monthly. The first British War Veterans paper published in the United States. "Some explanation is due to our subscribers regarding what may appear to them the somewhat fitful method of the publishing of this little journal. It must first be born in mind that everything in connection with it is purely voluntary and it takes time to get it image location
The Catholic Banner 1839- ? Contemporaneous history makes mention of the Catrholic Banner, weekly, as appearing in 1839, and of its suspension soon afterward. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri edited by Howard L. Conard, 1902). In 1839, Thomas Mullen started the Catholic Banner. Its career...is shrouded in oblivion. (From the History of St. Louis City and County, John Thomas Scharf, 1883). image location
Catholic Cabinet and Chronicles of Religious Instruction 1843- 1845 It was published by William J. Mullin, and each number contained sixty-four pages of reading matter; its advertisements occupied two pages of its cover. While an occasional original article appeared, the bulks of its contents consisted of reprints and translations from the leading Catholic reviews and periodicals published abroad, and local religious notes and news. It was issued about image location
Catholic Herald 1924?- 1951? Previously, St. Louis Catholic Herald. image location
The Catholic News Letter 1845- 1864 William J. Mullin, publisher. “Edited by an Association of Gentlemen” Name changed to the St. Louis News Letter. image location
The Cavalier 1866- 1867 Literary publication. John C. Moore & V.W. Barret, editors.  image location
The Caveat 1922- 1924 Monthly commentary. image location
The Censor 1898- 1947 Formerly Dyer's News Letter Dyer’s News Letter, a little bundle of sweetness and vitriol, hit the news stand at 816 Chestnut Street on a Saturday morning in the fall of 1896, and the city was never quite the same during the fifty years it flourished. Had theatrical comment (which filled most of the first issue) been all, the life of image location
Central Afro-American 1909- 1914? W.H. King, editor/publisher. Republican. image location
The Central Baptist 1868- 1912? “The Faith – The Ordinances – The Life” J.C. Armstrong and A.W. Payne, publishers; J.C. Armstrong, editor. Absorbed by Word and Way in Kansas City. image location
The Central Christian Advocate 1853- 1855, 1856- 1929 Some time in 1852 or 1853 the Rev. W.D.R. Trotter began the publication of the Central Christian Advocate, a Methodist Journal. It never commended itself to the General Methodist Conference, and lasted only two or three years. In 1856 the Conference authorized the founding of a new paper and gave it the name of Central Christian Advocate...It is published image location
Central Countian 1996 image location
Central Cyclist 1896 A weekly, it folded after four months and was sold to Pedal. Douglas Robert, ed./pub. In its first issue, the magazine wrote: "The Central Cyclist doffs its cap to the cycling public of St. Louis and the central part of the country." The magazine proclaimed that it was no general organ on wheeling and that it would not be part of image location
Central Law Journal 1874- 1927 The Central Law Journal was established in 1874 by Soule, Thomas & Wentworth, the editors being J.F. Dillon and S.D. Thompson, subsequently well-known judges. The ownership has passed successively to G.I. Jones, Judge Thompson, and W.H. Stevenson, and lastly to Mr. Soule, who is sole owner. J.D. Lawson was the second editor, and W.L. Murfree, Jr., is the present image location
The Central Magazine 1872- 1877 The Central Magazine, Miss Mary Nolan, editor and publisher, resulted from dissentions that arose among the publishers of The Inland Magazine. It was a sixty-eight page monthly with a frontispiece. The first number was issued in July, 1872, and it lived some five years. It was unusually light and trivial. Miss Nolan kept a Catholic bookstore on Washington Avenue. (From the Encyclopedia of the image location
Central Newsmagazine 2007- Doug Huber, publisher; Terry Dean, managing editor. image location
The Central Post 1870 German. C. Robyn, editor. image location
Central States Archaeological Journal 1954- 1972 Central States Archaeological Societies, Inc.,  Dale Van Blair, editor.      image location
Central-Blatt and Social Justice 1908- 1938 Published in German and English by the Central Bureau of the Central Verein. Monthly Var. Central Blatt. Social Justice. image location
Ceska Zena 1908- Czech weekly. Bohemian Literary Society. image location
The Champion 1881- 1914 Weekly labor publication. Champion Publishing Company. image location
Chaperone Magazine 1890- 1914 The Chaperone, volume I, number I, was issued in March, 1890. It contains ninety-eight pages of illustrated reading matter, and is essentially a ladies' magazine of the modern class. The largest portion of its contents consists of light literature - stories and poems, and the remainder is divided into departments - "Dress and Fashion," "With the Children," "His Majesty, the Baby," image location
Cherokee News - 1933 Became the South Side Journal. image location
The Children's Comrade 1918- 1931? ​Weekly religious publication for children published by the Evangelical Synod of North America. Fred McQueen, editor (1930). image location
Chippewa-Broadway News 1923?- 1928 image location
The Christian 1873- 1882 In 1864, E.L. Craig, a prominent preacher in the Disciples (or Campbellite) Church, founded the Gospel Echo, a monthly publication, of which he was both editor and proprietor. In 1867, he sold the paper to J.C. Reynolds, a professor in Abingdon College, Illinois, also a preacher in the Christian denomination...who a year later associated with himself J.H. Garrison, a image location
Christian Advocate 1850- 1930 The Christian Advocate, organ of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Was founded in 1850. For the great part of the time from 1851 to 1890, Rev. D.R. McAnally was editor. Var.: St. Louis Christian Advocate image location
Christian Evangelist 1865- 1936 A continuation of Christian. J.H. Garrison and B.W. Johnson, editors. Christian Publishing Company. image location
Christian News 1875- 1876 The Christian News was a monthly publication issued at Alton and published in the interest of the Congregationalist Church. E.A. Smith was the publisher. The first issue was made in 1875. At the end of one year it was sold to the Advance Company in Chicago. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois by W.R. Brink & Co. 1882). image location
Christliche Kinder-Deitung 1866- 1928 "Christian Children's Newspaper" A. Weibush & Son Printing, publisher; Rev. Karl Kissling, editor. image location
Christlicher Wegweiser 1863 Catholic magazine. Franz Safer publishing image location
The Chronicle 1880- 1905 The Chronicle was started as a six-column, two-cent paper, made up of short, pithy articles and "scare" headlines. Stanley Waterloo, since distinguished as a novelist, was the first managing editor, assisted by W.V. Byars, a well-known litterateur and journalist.  Dr. John B. Wood, the "Great American condenser," came from New York in 1882 to take charge. W.H. Little was image location
Chronik 1861 German-language. image location
Church Progress 1911- 1929 Catholic Publishing Company. Continued Church Progress and Catholic World. image location
The Church Progress and Catholic World 1898- 1911 Catholic Publishing Company. John Paul Chew, editor.  “Established 1878.” Became Church Progress. image location
Cimeter 1884- 1885? Monthly temperance publication of the WCTU. Rev. George W. Hughey, a Methodist minister, was the editor/publisher. image location
Citizen Crusader 1961 Weekly. Ernest Calloway, publisher. Became New Citizen. image location
Citizen Journal 1990- ? Semi-weekly. image location
Citizen Response 1994 Monthly published by Response Publications (Mark Comfort). Don Hinds, editor. image location
Citizens Informer 1969- 2004 A publication of the Council of Conservative Citizens. image location
Citizens' Industrial Exponent 1905 Published by the Citizens' Industrial Association of St. Louis image location
Citizens’ Informant 1895 Weekly. W.C. Henderson, publisher, editor and manager. image location
City 1834 image location
City Beautiful 1929- 1930 ​  Helen Seevers, editor. image location
City Scape 1996 Quarterly newsletter for and about University City. Maryanne Dersch, editor. image location
Clarion 1914- 1922? Negro Republican publication. C.K. Robinson and Associates. Var: Independent Clarion. image location
Clayton Argus 1887- 1920? The Clayton Democrat was purchased by Chas. R. Black in August, 1887 and its name was changed to The Clayton Argus. Chas. R. Black was a son of Samuel and Amanda J. Black, a grandson of Mrs. Rebekah McCutchan, one of the first settlers in [St. Louis] County. He was a man of great force of character, a quiet man image location
The Clayton Citizen 1979- 1987 image location
Clayton Democrat 1879- 1887 ​Name changed from Weekly Mail in 1879, “published successively by Lewis & Stevens; Thomas and John Diggs; and Walter T. Payne; from the latter being purchased by Chas. R. Black in August, 1887. Mr. Black changed its name to The Clayton Argus.” (Originally published in The History of St. Louis County by William L. Thomas, 1911). image location
Clayton Leader 1971- ? Don Hermann, editor/publisher. Monthly image location
Clayton Times 1979- 1983 Carol Jablonow and Vicki Levitt, founders. Became St. Louis Weekly image location
The Claytonian 1970- Began as Claytonian-Tribune. Alexander Sonnenschein, editor/publisher. image location
Claytonian Tribune 1937- 1970 Al Sonnenschein, publisher. Became Claytonian. image location
Cleaning and Dying World 1914- ? J. Roe Purchase, editor/publisher. image location
Climate 1898- 1900? A strong corps of collaborators furnish special articles on climate, mineral springs, diet, preventive medicine, race, occupation, life insurance, and sanitary science in relation to disease. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri edited by Howard L. Conard, 1901). Dr. S. Claiborne Martin, Jr., editor; Climate Publishing Company. image location
Clinical Reporter 1888- 1895, 1897- Irenaeus D. Foulon, editor; Foulan & Co., publishers. Merged with St. Louis Journal of Homeopathy to become St. Louis Journal of Homeopathy and Clinical Reporter. In 1897, the name was again changed, back to the Clinical Reporter. image location
Club Management 1927- 2007 Donald Clark, editor/publisher. Thomas Finan became publisher, 1989- 2007. Var.: Modern Club; Modern Club Management image location
CNR (See: St. Louis Construction News & Review) image location
Coffee Break 1973- 1984 A weekly magazine for office women. Donald F. Herrmann, editor/publisher. image location
Collinsville Argus 1871- ? The Argus was established in Colliinsville August 12, 1871. The Union Publishing Company were the proprietors, and A.W. Angier editor. At the end of the first volume, Angier was succeeded by L.D. Caulk as editor. The paper was then owned  by the Collinsville Publishing Company, an organization of the leading business men of the village. Caulk was succeeded by image location
Collinsville Herald 1879- 1913? No. 1 of Vol. 1 was issued September 10th, 1879, James N. Peers, editor and publisher. It was a five column folio, later enlarged to a six , then a seven, and then changed to a five column quarto, cut and pasted. The Herald was independent in politics. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois by W.R. Brink & Co. image location
Collinsville Progress 1882- 1885? ​Published by the Jung brothers. image location
The Collinsville Star 1882 The first number was issued January 7th, 1882. Hugh Wetmore was the founder, editor and proprietor. He had, for a number of years, been connected with the newspapers of St. Louis. The Star was a three column, four page paper, independent in politics. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois by W.R. Brink & Co. 1882). image location
Colman’s Rural World 1853- 1918 In 1848, Ephraim Abbott established the Valley Farmer, a small monthly pamphlet. Five years later it was bought by Norman T. Colman, who changed the name to Colman's Rural World, and soon after made it a weekly. Mr. Colman has been its publisher ever since; it is now a six-column quarto with a large circulation. Its specialty is the image location
Comic Art 2002- 2003? ​Quarterly edited and published by M. Todd Hignite image location
Coming Country 1904- 1913 Illustrated monthly about Southern life. image location
Commerce Monthly 1905- 1906 Monthly dedicated to banking and financial interests. Commerce Publishing Company. image location
The Commercial 1875- 1876 Weekly that lasted less than 6 months. W. Bell, publisher. image location
Commercial Advertiser 1826- 1827 Major William Orr, editor. Var: St. Louis Commercial Advertiser. Renamed Missouri Observer and St. Louis Advertiser. image location
Commercial Bulletin 1835- 1836 Founded by Samuel B. “Steamboat” Churchill, Col. Charles Keemle and William Preston Clark, with Keemle serving as editor and publisher. By the end of 1835, Keemle and Churchill had departed. By 1840 Oliver Harris was part of the ownership team. At first it was published three times a week and a subscription was $5.00 per year. It was a image location
Commercial Gazette 1873- 1883 W. L. Thomas, publisher.  Var.: St. Louis Commercial Gazette; Midland Industrial Gazette. image location
Commercial Lawyer 1894?- 1902 Commercial Lawyer Publishing Company. Monthly. Merged into Legal News. image location
Commercial News and Labor Gazette 1908- 1915 George W. Briggs, editor/publisher. Var.: St. Louis Commercial News and Labor Gazette image location
Commercial Record 1878 Advertising organ. R. & T.A. Evans, publishers. Var.: Saint Louis Commercial Record. image location
Commercial Review 1895- 1905 Briggs & Co. publisher. image location
Commercial Review and Manufacturer’s Record 1876 George W. Briggs, publisher. image location
Commercial Traveler 1894- 1907 Burt W. Lyon, editor; Commercial Traveler Publishing Co. image location
The Commonwealth 1901- 1904 A monthly magazine devoted to the commonwealth of thought. Francis A. Thornton, editor. image location
The Communist 1845- 1885 Alexander Longley, editor.  “Devoted to Unitary Homes, Mutual Support, United Labor, Common Property, and Equal Rights to All.” image location
Community Courier 1922- 1935? ​  Community Council of St. Louis, publisher. image location
Community News 1921- Weekly. H.E. Huneke. (2014) "Serving St. Louis, St. Charles and Lincoln Counties." image location
Community Press 1935- 1951 ​Affton image location
Community Press 1935- 1974? Ellisville. Hausman Publications, Gardner Hausman, publisher; Marian Hausman, editor. image location
Compton's St. Louis Musical Journal 1866- Compton & Doun, publishers. This monthly was a three-column, sixteen-page paper devoted to general and local music notes, personals, etc. Each number contained several pages of "sheet music." It lived less than two years. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901) image location
Concert 1973 Wendell Moore, Publisher/Editor. "We're not just another rock magazine. We're the only music magazine headquartered in the Midwest - and we'll cover folk and pop as well as rock. Giving you a close-up look at the new sounds and top performers onstage and off in St. Louis, we'll have more photographs than other publications. And, in every issue, a image location
Concord Call 2000- 2002 Deborah Baker, publisher image location
Confederate Annals 1883 Confederate Annals, devoted to the history of the Civil War, was begun by J.W. Cunningham in June, 1883. In January, 1884, its name was changed to Union and Confederate Annals. It contained eighty pages. Three or four numbers were issued. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). Other sources indicate only two issues were published. image location
The Conservative 1865 image location
Construction Record 1954- 1970 Lucius B. Morse, publisher. Var.: St. Louis Construction Record image location
Consumer Trends 1962- 1979 James A. Ambrose, editor image location
The Corrector 1827- 1828 In 1827 Robert K. Fleming moved to Edwardsville and began publication of The Corrector. The paper was continued a little over a year, when it was suspended. (From the Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois edited by Newton Bateman and Paul Selby, 1907). image location
The Countersign 1864- ? image location
The Countian 1996- ? Reincarnation of West Countian. Countian Publications. Ed Bidzinski, publisher. image location
The Countian 1953- 1962 image location
The Countian 1996 image location
County Living 2004- ​A resource guide for home and lifestyle. Todd Abrams, publisher. image location
The County Register 1964? Monday through Friday.  Var.: St. Louis County Register. image location
County Star 1960- 1984? Weekly Var.: St. Louis County Star. image location
County Star-Journal 1984?- 1990? Dan Kilian, publisher. Gene Saffern, editor.  Var: County Star image location
The Courier 1873- 1895 United Church of Christ. C.H. Mott, publisher. German. Monday through Saturday. Var.: St. Louis Courier, Taglicher St. Louis Courier. image location
The Courier 1902- 1919 Kirkwood. Steve J. Harris, editor/publisher. Became the St. Louis Countian 1/20/1919. image location
The Courier of Medicine 1890- 1896 The Courier of Medicine succeeded the St. Louis Polyclinic instituted in 1889 in the interests of the St. Louis Postgraduate School of Medicine, and conducted by the faculty. In 1890 Dr. L.A. Turnbull was engaged to take charge of it, and shortly afterward he secured it entirely, and changed the name to The Courier of Medicine. This journal is not to be confounded image location
Courier Post 1997- ? Purchased by Dolan Media from Disney Company in 1997. image location
Creve Coeur-U. City Community News 1965- 1980 Weekly. Robert R. Buhrman, editor/publisher. image location
Creve Couer Community News 1965- 1970 Weekly. Robert and Oliver Buhrman, publishers. image location
Crisis 1830 The Crisis was the fourth newspaper published in Madison county. Its founder was Samuel S. Brooks. The date of the first number was April 14, 1830. It was a four column paper, published every Saturday in Edwardsville. Thirty-four numbers were published. The name was then changed to the Illinois Advocate. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois, by W.R. Brink image location
The Criterion 1896- 1897 Former St. Louis Life. Weekly.  A Straighforward Statement The Criterion has now secured the collaboration of almost all the best writers, composers and artists of this city. Each number contains bright, original articles on a variety of subjects, and generally an excellent song composed especially for our publication by one of the local musicians. The Criterion is the only paper image location
The Criterion 1882- 1883 F. Weber Benton issued the first number of The Criterion on May 6, 1882. Its contents consisted principally of short essays and papers on general literary topics; about one-sixth of its space was set aside for local dramatic and musical reviews...The Criterion lived until February, 1883. It contained from sixteen to twenty pages of three columns each. (From the Encyclopedia of the History image location
The Critic 1876- 1900 Anillustrated monthly review of literature, art and life. John D. Finney, editor/St. Louis Critic Publishing Company. Var: St. Louis Critic. image location
The Cross and the Flag 1942- 1969 ​Monthly Christian Nationalist publication. Gerald L.K. Smith, publisher/Don Lohbeck, editor. Later became a quarterly. image location
Crossman's St. Louis County Magazine 1904 ​[R.B. Crossman] essayed the publication of a magazine called Crossman’s St. Louis County Magazine. It was discontinued after the third volume. (Originally published in the History of St. Louis County by William L. Thomas, 1911).) image location
The Crusader 1959-1976? The Crusader is a weekly newspaper for the Metropolitan St. Louis area that will at all times present true unadulterated facts in its news stories and current features. The news will be presented fairly, but squarely. Neither money nor friendship will sway this newspaper from its avowed purpose. The Crusader prints all news without fear. Robert Mack - Managing image location
Cumberland Presbyterian 1855- 1874 The paper was removed from St. Louis to Alton in March, 1855, and there published until the following June. The subscription lists were then sold and transferred to the Watchman and Evangelist at Louisville, Kentucky. It was edited by J.B. Logan, a distinguished minister of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The paper was originally started in April, 1852, at Lexington, image location
Curled Wire Chronicle 1953-1955 Trade publication. Casey Casebolt, editor. image location
Cut-Over Lands 1918- 1919 James E. Gatewood, editor/publisher. Became Mississippi Valley Magazine. image location
The Daily Advocate 1898- ? Belleville Advocate Publishing Company. image location
Daily Belleville Eagle 1853- ? ​     image location
Daily Bulletin 1861 Johnstone, Tracey & Company, publishers. Var. Bulletin. image location
Daily Commercial Bulletin 1838- 1841? Churchill & Ramsey, editors. Var.: Daily Commercial Bulletin and Missouri Literary Register image location
Daily Commercial Bulletin and Missouri Literary Register 1836-1838 The history of the [Daily Commercial] Bulletin in its early years is obscure. We do know that during this time Charles G. Ramsey became connected with the establishment. In 1840 Oliver Harris joined the paper as a member of the firm Churchill, Harris and Cady. Harris had formerly been associated with Chambers and Knapp in the publication of the image location
The Daily Dispatch 1861 The first copy of the Daily Dispatch appeared March 7th, 1861. It was edited and printed by Thomas H. Fleming and G.M. Williams. On the 19th of the same month it was transferred to G.A. Harvey, publisher of the Democrat. He continued it until Aug. 3d of the same year when its publication ceased. The reason given was that image location
Daily Evening Gazette 1838- D.L. Holbrook & Company, publisher. Var.: Evening Gazette image location
The Daily Evening Herald 1835 1835   First daily in Missouri, lasted six months. Also published a weekly. R.M. Treadway and J.W. Albright. Var.: St. Louis Daily Evening Herald and Commercial Advertiser. image location
The Daily Evening Mirror 1855- M. Niedner & Company, publisher. image location
The Daily Evening Missourian 1861- ? Missourian Publishing Company image location
The Daily Evening News and Intelligencer 1852 The Daily Evening News, jointly owned by Charles G. Ramsey and Abraham S. Mitchell, was established in 1852, and started with the small circulation of five hundred copies. It was ably edited and soon became regarded with favor by the community. Its circulation has continually increased until it has reached 4,000 dailies, 7,000 weeklies, and 500 tri-weeklies, and the image location
Daily Express 1860- 1866 William Cuddy, publisher. image location
Daily Hotel Register 1874- 1891 Publication of the Western Commercial Travelers’ Association. H.B. Wandell, editor. Var: Hotel Reporter image location
Daily Hotel Reporter 1879- 1904 Hotel Reporter Company, publisher. Var: Daily Hotel Reporter, Commercial and Railway Journal. image location
Daily Independent 1877 Daily Independent            On the 1st of January, 1877, George Auerswald issued the first number of the Daily Independent, which was published for several months and then suspended.             (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois). image location
The Daily Journal 1871- ? This paper is an outgrowth of the old Journal of Commerce, a weekly newspaper established in 1858. About 1871, Mr. W. V. Wolcott, in connection with some other gentlemen, conceived the project of establishing a daily newspaper. The Journal was commenced as an afternoon paper, under the editorial management of Mr. Hume, a versatile and forcible writer. The proprietors had image location
The Daily Journal 1914- 1918 ​(E. St. Louis) image location
Daily Missouri Democrat 1852- 1868 The Missouri DemocratRichard Edwards and Dr. M. Hopewell             The Missouri Democrat was established in 1852 by William McKee and William Hill under propitious auspices. All the patronage which had been bestowed upon the Sentinel and Union, two popular journals, was turned upon the new enterprise; for both of these papers were discontinued at the commencement of the Democrat, so image location
Daily Missouri Republican 1837- 1849 Renamed Missouri Republican. image location
The Daily Missouri State Journal 1861 M. Niedner, publisher. J.W. Tucker, editor. image location
Daily Missourian 1844- 1845 V.P. Von Antwerp, publisher. Renamed the Daily Morning Missourian. image location
The Daily Morning Herald 1852- 1860? ​Russell S. Higgins returned to St. Louis in 1852 and associated himself with Phillip G. Ferguson on the Morning Herald. It became a paying paper. He sold out his interest in the Herald about 1854 and moved away…Mr. Higgins was almost alone of the newspaper proprietors of those days who could show a good balance at the end of image location
Daily Morning Missourian 1845- 1846 Paper was merged with The Missouri Reporter in 1846 to form the St. Louis Union. image location
The Daily News 1906- 1907 Jeff Gluck - publisher image location
The Daily News-Democrat 1901 “It Prints the News.” “It Prints the Pictures.” Belleville. image location
Daily News-Review 1926- ? East St. Louis Daily image location
Daily Organ and Reveille 1839- 1852 Russell S. Higgins, who came to St. Louis as a printer about 1838, was a partner of Abel Rathbone Corbin in the publication of the Missouri Argus. About the year 1840 Mr. Higgins started the first penny newspaper west of the Mississippi, calling it the People’s Organ. He conducted the penny paper for five or six years and sold it image location
The Daily Pennant 1839- 1840 Thomas Watson and G.G. Foster, proprietors. H.F. Watson & W. Nichols, editors. By 1840, control had been transferred to Foster, Hall and Shaw, with Foster serving as editor. image location
The Daily Pennant and Native American 1840- 1841 P.W. Johnstone, publisher image location
The Daily People’s Organ 1840- 1846 ​Russell S. Higgins, who came to St. Louis as a printer about 1838, was a partner of Abel Rathbone Corbin in the publication of the Missouri Argus. About the year 1840 Mr. Higgins started the first penny newspaper west of the Mississippi, calling it the People’s Organ. He conducted the penny paper for five or six years and sold image location
Daily Record 1907- 1921 Lucius B. Morse, publisher. image location
The Daily Reveille 1847- 1950 In 1847, Charles Keemle, Matthew Field and Joseph M. Field started the Reveille, a daily. Field was at that time recognized as one of the most fascinating newspaper writers in the country…Five years the Reveille delighted St. Louis readers. Then it was sold [to Edmund Flagg] and merged in the People’s Organ [in October of 1850]. (From St. Louis, image location
Daily St. Louis Intelligencer 1851- 1857 ​George Budd, Proprietor and Commercial Editor. Var: St. Louis Intelligencer, St. Louis Daily Intelligencer. image location
The Daily Traveler 1861?- 1896? James & Marc, publishers​      image location
Dairyman's Journal 1926 ​Edwin Popkess, editor/publisher. image location
Das Journal L.W. Habercom started this German paper in Belleville. After twenty issues it was sold to the Zeitung. (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois by Brink, McDonough & Co. 1881). image location
Decor 1880- Monthly business magazine of fine art and framing published by Commerce Publishing Co. image location
Defecator 1885- 1887 Monthly agricultural publication addressing the removal of impurities from sugar cane.  J.A. Field, editor. image location
The Democrat 1879- 1887? ​Based in Clayton. image location
Democratic Bulletin 1898- 1899 C.J. Nordmeyer, editor. English & German. image location
Democratic Free Press 1864 Weekly. Var.: Free Press; Weekly Democratic Free Press image location
Demokrat 1903?- 1908? Daily. Dr. Wilhelm Forgo, editor/ German Publishing Company. image location
Demokratische Presse 1852- 1854 Christian Kribben, editor;Franz Andreas Heinrich Schneider, publisher.  Continued as Missouri Zeitung. image location
Demokratische Tribune 1850- 1852 Weekly. J.G. Woener, manager.   Was absorbed by Deutsch Amerikaner. image location
Dental Era 1902- 1910 John Kennerly and Hermann Prince, editors. Monthly published by John T. Nolde Dental Manufacturing Company. image location
Department Store Merchandising 1940- 1941 Merchandising Publications, Sidney Carter, editor. image location
Der Daily Stern 1878- 1881? The publication of the Daily Stern was begun January 11, 1878, with Henry Huhn as editor. (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois by Brink, McDonough & Co. 1881). image location
Der Deutsche Pionier image location
Der Freisinnige 1846- 1847 Der Freisinnige was an atheist paper, published weekly by L.F. Volland and edited by Joseph Schoberlechner. It was the organ of a club of free-thinkers. The first number was issued in November, 1846, and the last some time in 1847. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
Der Lutheraner 1844?- 1911? Dr. C.F.W. Walther, editor; Concordia Publishing House. image location
Der Missionar 1881- 1883? Monthly German language paper published in Marthasville and St. Louis  image location
Der Salon 1857 ​Sunday edition of Anzeigers des Westens. image location
Der Schalk 1879- 1896? German weekly humor magazine. H. Hermanns, editor/ publisher. image location
Der Sonnenschein 1899- 1900 (“Sunshine”) image location
Der Stern 1877- 1881? In 1877 some influential German Democrats of Belleville organized a stock company, known as the “Belleville Printing Company,” with a capital stock of $6000. The Directors the first year were Hon. Gustavus A. Koerner, President; Franz F. Metschan, Secretary; Henry A. Kircher, Treasurer; Alonzo S. Wildman and Louis Pittham. F.F. Metschan was elected Business Manager, and Frederick E. Scheel, image location
Der Volksanwalt 1902- 1903 (“The People Rule”)  Arbeiter Zeitung was publisher. image location
Der Vorsteher 1907- 1913 “First and Only Jewish Daily in St. Louis and Great Southwest” image location
Design StL 2018- Published bi-monthly by St. Louis Magazine image location
Detector 0 image location
Deutsch Amerikaner 1851 image location
Deutsch Amerikanische Krieger Zeitung 1885- 1895 (“German-American Warrior Newspaper”) Louis Willich, editor/ publisher. image location
Deutsch Wochenschrift 1938?- 1942?, 1969?- 1982? Eugen Geissler, editor and publisher. image location
Deutsch Zeitung 1861 (“German Newspaper”) image location
Deutsche Amerikaner 1851- Abssorbed the Demokratische Tribune. image location
Deutsche Amerikanischer 1889- 1901 German religious paper published by the German Evangelical Synod of North America. image location
Deutsche Tribune 1844- 1850 On the 15th of July, 1844, appeared the Deutsche Tribune, published by N.R. Cormany, and printed entirely in German. The editor was Charles Jucksh, and the paper was issued every day in the week except Monday, the publication office being on Vine Street, between Main and Second. In March, 1845, Oswald Benckendorf became the editor. The Tribune continued under image location
Deutsche Wochenschrift 1939- Weekly German magazine image location
Deutsche-Blatter 1853 Ferdinand Richter, editor/publisher. Lasted one month. image location
Deutsche-Blatter 1863- 1870 (“German Page”)  image location
Deutscher Demokrat 1856- 1857 No. 1 of Vol. 1 made its appearance in Belleville July 1st, 1856. It was a radical, outspoken Democratic newspaper, edited and managed by Louis Didier. With the appearance of No. 38 of Vol. 1, A. Ruoff became editor and publisher. This arrangement continued for a few weeks, when Didier became editor for the second time and G.A. Harvey, image location
Deutscher Missionsfreund 1883- 1889 Published by the German Evangelical Synod of North America. image location
Die Laterne 1876?- 1900? Louis Willich, the former partner of Joseph Kepler in the publication of Puck in St. Louis, issued Die Laterne after Puck had been transferred to New York. It lived through several years under Willich's management and finally passed into the hands of  G. Bruechner & Co., who, in June, 1882, issued an English edition under the name of The Lantern, with Walt. S. Mason, fresh from The Hornet, as image location
Die Parole 1884- 1891 German. Internationale Arbeiter Association, publisher. image location
Die Rundschau 1880- 1929? Louis Lange, publisher. image location
Die Union 1876?- 1877? St. Charles image location
Die Vehme 1869- 1871 Joseph Keppler, the famous artist of the New York Puck, who was worth several hundred thousand dollars when he died, was the same Joe Keppler, half-starved Bohemian, who tried to publish a humorous paper in St. Louis at any time between 1869-1876. With Heinrich Binder, late in the summer of 1869, he issued a German humorous weekly, Die Vehme. After a checkered image location
Die Volkstribune 1861? image location
Die Waage 1844 In 1844, Paul Follemins was invited to come to St. Louis and assume the editorial management of the Anzeiger des Westens, but the arrangement was not perfected, and Follemins established Die Waage (The Venture). It was conducted with ability and spirit, but those were not the times, and the slave-holding city of St. Louis certainly was not the place image location
Die Waechter 1897- 1898 Die Waechter was established in September, 1897, in the interest of German Catholic societies. Although a distinctively religious journal, it was tinged with socialistic predilections. Until August, 1898, it was a monthly publication; it then became a weekly, but after four issues it passed out of existence in September, 1898. Mr. F. Tombridge  was editor and publisher during its image location
Die Wahre Republikaner 1870 (“True Republican”) Campaign newspaper image location
Die Wahrheit 1871 Jewish, anti-Catholic. S.H. Sonnenschien, editor; Friedrich Roeslein, publisher. image location
Die Windmuhle 1868 German humor weekly. Edward Luther, editor/publisher. image location
Dijaspora Bosnjacka 2004- 2010 Bosnian. Murat Muratovic, publisher. image location
Dinner Table 1901- A daily news publication distributed to area restaurants. image location
Dispatch 1864-1878 From 1864-1878 the Dispatch passed through vicissitudes which ought to have wrecked it half a dozen times.  Checkered is hardly the word to apply because that would mean alternate prosperity and adversity. The Dispatch had few periods of prosperity. Its career was almost continuous adversity. There was a period when the prospect seemed hopeful; Charles P. Johnson was one image location
Distiller and Brewer 1882- 1883 Semi-monthly. Kretschmar and Jackson, publishers; C.W. Bellairs, editor. image location
Doane's Agricultural Report 1961- Dan Henley, editor.   image location
Doctor 1887- 1931 Quarterly published by Peacock Chemical Company. Ostensibly a magazine in which physicians share remedies and advice. Many of the suggestions involve Peacock products. image location
Drug World 1881- 1883 Monthly devoted to drug, oil, paint and glass interests. J.J. Lawrence & Sons, editor/ publisher. image location
Dry Goodsman and General Merchant 1898- 1930 Textile Publication Co. Var.: Dry Goodsman and Southwestern Merchant (1920?), National Drygoodsman. image location
The Dry Goodsman and Southwestern Merchant 1920? ​      image location
Dunkerdoings 1943- 1952 Humor publication. F. P. O'Hare publisher image location
Dutchtowner 1989- 2002 Newspaper of the Dutchtown South community of St. Louis. image location
Dyer’s News Letter 1896- 1898 Dyer's News-Letter went through the mail for the first time on February 8, 1896. It is a weekly of sixteen pages of four columns each, edited and published by George N. Dyer. It is devoted principally to local politics and personal items; theatrical and society matters, and notes on general occurrences of national importance fill the remaining space. It is image location
Eagle 1854 The first number of the Eagle was issued in Belleville February 13th, 1854, by Messrs. Bevirt & Shoupe, two young men, both practical printers but having no editorial experience. It was placed under the editorial control of “Gov. [John] Reynolds,” who conducted it for a short time. When first issued it was a daily, but it was soon changed image location
East St. Louis Daily Gazette 1877 In 1877, the Daily Gazette was issued by the owners of the East St. Louis Gazette, but not proving sufficiently remunerative for the labor performed, it was abandoned. (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois by Brink, McDonough & Co. 1881).  image location
East St. Louis Daily Journal 1890- 1914 Became Daily Journal and East St. Louis Journal. James W. Kirk, editor/ M.P. Linn, manager. image location
East St. Louis Daily Press 1874 The Daily Press            On the 21st of Sept., 1874, was commenced the issue of the Daily Press in East St. Louis, which after a few months was abandoned. Mr. H.D. O’Brien was the publisher.             (From the History of St. Clair County). image location
East St. Louis Gazette 1866- 1913 On June 28th, 1866, the Gazette was founded by the former mayor, the Hon. John B. Bowman, one of East St. Louis’ most active and enterprising men. For twenty years and until Mr. Bowman's death in 1885, the Gazette, under his control and management, ranked as the leading paper in St. Clair County. It was located at 120 North image location
East St. Louis Herald 1878- 1884? Messrs. Harney & Tissler, two enterprising young men of East St. Louis, opened the office, and, on the 9th of March, 1878, issued the first number of the Herald, a spicy and neatly printed newspaper. When the Herald started, it was an eight-column folio, which form it retained until March 6, 1880, when it was changed to a five-column image location
East St. Louis Herald 1865- 1867 image location
East St. Louis Index 1872- ? image location
East St. Louis Journal 1888- 1958 Purchased by Lindsay-Schaub Newspapers in 1932. Became St. Clair and Madison Counties Evening and Sunday Journal. image location
East St. Louis Labor 1894- Socialist Newspaper Union, publisher. Var: East Saint Louis Labor image location
East St. Louis Mail 1917- ? Official Organ of the Home Trade League. Only Democratic Paper in East St. Louis. image location
East St. Louis Monitor 1963- 1983 “Southern Illinois’ Finest Weekly” Clyde C. Jordan, editor/publisher. image location
East St. Louis News-Review 1926- image location
East St. Louis Press 1938       image location
East St. Louis Weekly Press 1872- 1877 The paper, formerly the People’s Gazette, was published by Mr. Saltiel, who was succeeded by W.B. Fairchild. During the winter of 1874-75, Mr. Smith edited the paper. In 1875 H.D. O’Brien purchased the press and type of L.M. St. John, who had become possessed of all stock, and continued as editor and publisher until Feb. 28th, 1877, when the image location
Echo St. Louiskie 1899- 1901 Weekly. A. Balcerzak & C. Janowski, editors/publishers. image location
Eclectic Medical Journal 1873- 1875 George H. Field, editor Var.: Eclectic Medical and College Journal image location
Education St. Louis 1990- ? Angela Page Wexelman, editor/publisher image location
Edwards Weekly 1859?- 1861? Journal of western progress, an organ of the progressive in art, literature, science, agriculture, banking, internal improvements, etcs.    Richard Edwards, publisher. image location
Edwardsville Democrat 1882- 1924 Weekly. A.L. Brown, publisher. Formerly the Times. image location
Edwardsville Demokrat 1880 This German paper was first issued in March, 1880, by Gustavus Schwendler, publisher. Hon. B.E. Hoffman was employed as editor. After four months' trial Mr. Schwendler was convinced that a German newspaper in Edwardsville would not pay, and the publication ceased. It was Democratic in tone. (From The Histgory of Madison County, Illinois by W.R. Brink & Co. 1882). image location
Edwardsville Intelligencer 1862- The Intelligencer was founded by James R. Brown at Edwardsville, October 24th, 1862. It started as a Democratic paper and remained so, notwithstanding the vicissitudes through which papers of that political complexion passed. Mr. Brown conducted the Intelligencer until his death, which event occurred April 30, 1882. He was a native of England. He came to America while yet image location
Edwardsville Republican 1869- The paper was established by S.V. Crossman, a practical printer. He was an Englishman by birth, and came to America and learned the trade in Cincinnati. In 1854 he came to Alton, and there connected with the publication of different papers. He was the foreman and superintendent of the mechanical department of the Courier office for a number of image location
Edwardsville Spectator 1819- 1827 The first issue was made May 23d, 1819, less than one year after the State was admitted to the Union. In form it was a five column folio neatly printed and ably edited. Few if any newspapers were ever established in the west that at once took a more prominent position, or, in so short a time, commanded and image location
Edwardsville Star of the West 1822?- 1826? ​Var.: Star of the West image location
Edwardsville Times 1881- 1882 Originally published as Our Times, the paper's name was changed to the Edwardsville Times on the 28th of May, 1881. Co-owner Price withdrew from the firm June 18, 1881, and Mr. John L. Simcox continued the publication until July 16, when he took in as a partner E.W. Anderson. The latter retired October 8, 1881. Mr. Simcox remained sole image location
El Comercio del Valle 1876- 1890 El Comercio del Valle, a monthly, devoted to the development of trade with the Spanish-speaking countries, Mexico, South America, etc., was published by John F. Cahill, Mexican Consul in St. Louis, from 1876...From 1864 to 1872 Mr. Cahill was in the drug business in Cuba, where he acquired a knowledge of the Spanish tongue. Outside of his paper he has done image location
El Internacional 1898 Spanish literary magazine. C.M. Sandoval, editor; International Publishing Company. image location
El Sol de St. Louis 2007- Cristobal Mauricio, director general; Loriceli Mauricio, co-publisher. image location
Electric St. Louis Magazine 1910- 1914 Trade journal. Electric St. Louis Publishing. Ell Chalmers Bennett, managing editor. image location
Elephant 1922- 1937 Published by Republican Women's Club of St. Louis image location
Eleven Magazine 2008- 2016 Monthly music magazine. Hugh Scott, publisher. image location
Eli Grocer and General Merchant 1904- 1906 Weekly edited by Robert E. Lee. image location
Emigrant and General Advertiser 1817- 1819 Colonel [Charles] Keemle’s newspaper connections began on the Emigrant. That was the paper which under the name of the Western Journal was started in 1815 on a fund of $1,000 raised by citizens who wanted to fight Colonel Charless’ Gazette. Keemle was a Philadelphian. He was only seventeen years old when he came to St. Louis but he had image location
The Entertainers 1972 Monthly, Bill Dennis, publisher image location
Ephemeron 1855 Also Fair Gazette. image location
Equality 1905 Published by The Equal Suffrage Publishing Co. Only one issue has been found. image location
Es Videke 1912- 1918 ​Possible 1958?- 1969? image location
Esprit 1983- 1984? Gerri Martin, editor/publisher. Dedicated to the presentation, appreciation, promotion and development of the arts. image location
Evangelische Diakonissenfreund 1893- 1916 Eden Publishing House image location
Evangelisches Gemeindeblatt 1879- 1897 Aug. Weibusch & Sons for the German Evangelical Synod of North America. image location
The Evening Bulletin 1859- ? This already popular journal was established in 1859 by Messrs. Peckham & Bittenger, who, in a few months afterward, disposed of it to Mr. Eugene Longmaier, a young gentleman of fine attainments, who has commenced his editorial career with much promise. Mr. Longmaier is particularly suited to the atmosphere of St. Louis, for he was born in the Mound image location
Evening Call 1890 image location
The Evening Chronicle 1880- 1890 The Chronicle was started as a six-column, two-cent paper, made up of short, pithy articles and "scare" headlines. Stanley Waterloo, since distinguished as a novelist, was the first managing editor, assisted by W.V. Byars, a well-known litterateur and journalist.  Dr. John B. Wood, the "Great American condenser," came from New York in 1882 to take charge. W.H. Little was editor for a image location
The Evening Dispatch 1862- 1878 The Dispatch is the oldest evening journal in St. Louis. Long ago Charles G. Ramsey, Esq., published the Evening News. This was in the troublous war times, and Mr. Ramsey, who is a gentleman of great independence and boldness, succeeded in incurring  the ill opinion of the military authorities, which was not particularly advantageous to the interests of the image location
Evening Gazette 1833-1838 D.L. Holbrook & Company, publisher. Var: Daily Evening Gazette image location
Evening Herald 1835- ? First daily issued in St. Louis image location
Evening Journal 1895- 1897 Co-Operative Newspaper Publishing Company. image location
Evening Mirror 1848?- ? Shown in 1855 as the Daily Evening Mirror. M. Niedner and Company, publisher. image location
The Evening News 1852- 1867 Charles Ramsey, publisher Var.: St. Louis Daily Evening News. image location
Evening News and Intelligencer 1858?-1859? image location
The Evening Post 1878 The Evening Post Joseph A. Dacus and James William Buel             The youngest, and at the same time the most vivacious, brightest and interesting of St. Louis newspapers, is the Evening Post. The first number of this paper was issued January 10, 1878, by John A. Dillon, Esq., formerly editor of the Globe, and then on the staff of the image location
Evening Star Sayings 1888- 1895 John Wagner, editor. Became St. Louis Star-Sayings. image location
The Evening Whirl 1938- The Evening Whirl – Blood, Bodies and Babes By Roy Malone In the 1600s in Salem, Mass., and in some of the other colonies, wrongdoers were punished by having to sit in stocks and have passersby look at them. A form of this humiliation still exists here in St. Louis, where lawbreakers and other miscreants have their photos plastered image location
The Every Other Weekly 1985- 1989 Ed Presberg, publisher image location
Evolution 1947- 1970 Bill Campbell, editor. Monthly alternative. image location
Evolution Magazine 2018 Quarterly men's lifestyle publication. John Parker, publisher. image location
The Executive’s Magazine 1917- 1937 Paul W. Brown, founder, editor/publisher. Semi-monthly. image location
EXP 1998- 2004? EXP DebutsBy Joe Pollack             New for 1998 and aimed at the gay community, EXP is more serious than the average bar giveaway (or “bar rag,” as publisher Jeff Balk describes it).             Balk speaks to the purpose of the magazine, and managing editor Brock Graham does a saloon gossip column. The layout is rather clean, though most of the image location
Experience 1899- 1902 A monthly journal devoted to practical suggestions on standard and newer remedies. image location
The Exponent 1904- 1907 Crusading publication image location
The Exporter & Importer 1878- 1880 E.W. Fox, editor/publisher. Aim of publication is the “development and extension of domestic and foreign trade between the great interior basin of the United States and other states and countries.” image location
Express 1860- 1866 image location
Fair Gazette 1855 Also Ephemeron.  “Wise Enough to Play the Fool” image location
Fair Reporter 1880- 1882 Published in Belleville image location
Fairways & Greens 1996- 1998 Magazine catering to the area's golfers. William Mathis, publisher; Ellie Jones, executive editor. image location
Familije Vaennen 1885- 1895 Swedish monthly. Rev. C.A. Lindahl, editor/publisher. image location
Family Journal 1980- ? Debra K. Gluck, editor/publisher image location
Family Journal of Homeopathy 1854 In January, 1854, a sixteen-page monthly appeared under the title of The Family Journal of Homeopathy. It was published for one year. Drs. J.T. Temple and D. White were the editors. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri edited by Howard L. Conard, 1901). image location
Farm and Power Equipment 1946- 1959 Robert Thomann, editor. Var: Farm Equipment Retailing image location
Farm Equipment Retailing 1946- 1958 Published by and for members of the national retail farm equipment organization. Var.: Farm and Power Equipment image location
Farm Machinery 1872- 1923 C.K. and Anna C. Reifsnider, editors; Midland Publishing Co. Became Farm Machinery and Hardware. image location
Farm Machinery and Equipment 1930- 1945 Monthly. C.K. Reifsnider, editor; Midland Publishing Company. image location
Farm Machinery and Hardware 1923- 1930 Midland Publishing Company. Renamed Farm Machinery & Equipment. image location
Farm Progress 1904- 1919 George Knapp and Company, publisher. image location
Farm, Home and Trade 1889- 1899 George Steinhauser, editor. image location
Farmer's Monthly 1901- 1905 Farmer's Monthly Company image location
Farmers' Advertiser 1866- 1867 Published by Plant & Brother image location
Farmers’ and Mechanics’ Advocate 1832- 1835 James S. Mayfield and J. B. Bowlin. Mayfield withdrew in 1833. image location
The Farmer’s Call 1889 John M. Stahl & Co., editor/publisher. Multiple publishing locations, including St. Louis. image location
Fashion and Fancy 1888- 1891 Mrs. R.K. Walker, Miss Heartwell McGrath, publishers. image location
Fashions 1893- 1901 An illustrated monthly journal for American Women image location
Fast 1988- 1989 Magazine of high school news. Founders: Roy Malone, Pete Barrett. image location
Feast 2010- Inspired food culture. Lee Enterprises, publisher image location
Ferguson Blade 1916?- ? ​     image location
Ferguson Herald 1955- 1964 Weekly image location
Ferguson Reporter 1960?- 1961? Your community newspaper since 1922.  Al F. Erdelen, publisher; Jack H. Bender, editor. Formerly Town Talk. image location
Ferguson Times 1894- Monthly community paper funded by the City of Ferguson. image location
Fiery Cross 1923- 1924 Weekly image location
Fireside Visitor 1871- 1874? The Fireside Visitor, H.L. Aldrich & Company, publishers, was issued monthly during several years in the early and middle part of the [eighteen] seventies. It was devoted to insurance, manufacturing and railroad interests, and literary selections. H.E. Henley was its editor. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
Fireside Weekly 1873 The Fireside Weekly, Spencer Tompkins, publisher, made its appearance July 26, 1873. It was a literary journal on the order of the Eastern "popular literature" papers, the Fireside Companion, Saturday Night, etc., but was not illustrated. Mrs. Annie Robertson Noxon filled its pages with stories, poems and sketches from her prolific pen. It failed to visit the fireplaces of St. Louis during the image location
Fischer's Comic Almanac 1892 Published by F.J. Fischer news dealer. A regularly published listing of available comic publications. image location
Flag of Our Union 1845- 1852 “Literary and miscellaneous family journal, containing lies, wit, humor, and romance…independent of party or sect.”  Published by E.K. Woodward. image location
The Flash 1921-1922 Flash Publications. C. Butler Tyrrell, editor/publisher. Humor magazine. image location
Flashes of Negro Life 1944- 1945 Monthly jazz and entertainment magazine, J. Von Chapman, editor/publisher. image location
Flipside Newsmagazine 2002- 2003 Carlos Turner, President/editor-in-chief. Pinnacle Media Group. image location
Florissant News 1913?- ? John A. Lant, editor and proprietor. image location
The Florissant Valley Reporter 1915?- 1998? Henry G. Evans, editor and publisher. image location
Fly Fisherman 1969 Donald Zahner, editor image location
Fly Fishing Heritage 1986 Tom Widmar, publisher image location
Flying Dutchman 1974- 1980 Dutchtown Neighborhood publication image location
The Focus 1903- 1908 Published monthly for amateur photographers, amateur journalists, souvenir post card, stamp, coin and curio collectors. William Burton and Joseph Drakeford, editors. image location
Focus/Midwest 1962- 1983 Charles Klotzer, editor/publisher. image location
Fonetic Techer 1880- 1883 This magazine was established in July, 1879, by Professor T.R. Vickroy of St. Louis, a prominent member of the American Spelling Reform Association. Four numbers appeared that year, and in 1880 the Techer began to be published regularly as a monthly. In 1882 it appeared as a semi-monthly. It is printed in the transition alphabet of the Spelling Reform image location
Food Merchandising 1924- 1964 William Humberg, editor. image location
Force 1903- 1906 Sports magazine. John C. Meyers, editor. Force Publishing Company image location
Ford's Christian Repository and Home Circle 1883- 1906 Baptist publication image location
Ford’s Christian Repository 1853- 1883 Samuel H. Ford, editor. A theological review, a historic memorial, a religious lady's magazine and a child's companion. The Christian Repository is the only Theological and Literary Magazine in the Baptist denomination. It is found in the studies of our ablest divines, and in the cabins of our pious settlers. It is adapted in its variety to every member image location
Forward 1898? Var: Jewish Daily Forward image location
Forward St. Louis 1913- 1917 ​      image location
Fountain 1848- 1850 The Fountain was begun in July, 1848; it was first a weekly and subsequently a daily. It was devoted "chiefly to the cause of temperance and the advocacy of the societies and clubs formed to promote this object and the cause of temperance and reform." [Benjamin] Hayes, the publisher, sold the paper to the Rev. Hiram P. Goodrich in July, 1849. image location
Fowl Ball 1995- Jim Mense, publisher; Don Hayes, editor image location
Frank und Frei 1870 Founded as an illustrated humor magazine by Joseph Keppler image location
Franklin Avenue Weekly Bulletin 1875- 1876 A.G. McCormick, publisher. image location
Free Lance image location
The Free Press 1832- 1833 The Free Press appeared in St. Louis in April, 1832 under the editorship of John Steele. It was a Democratic journal founded upon the principles "which governed the Republican party in he elevation of Thomas Jefferson over the first Adams." It was a weekly paper of four pages containing twenty-four columns, measuring 14 1/2 x 19 1/2 inches. The image location
Freedman’s Journal 1878- 1881 Var: Freeman’s Journal. image location
Freie Blatter 1851- 1853 Exerpts from “Franz Schmidt and the Freie Blatter of St. Louis, 1851-1853”By Steven Rowan              What he was about in St. Louis, besides teaching school, was editing a newspaper under the aegis of Heinrich Bornstein (Henry Bornstein), a man who has had as many enemies as the lovable Schmidt had friends. Heinrich Bornstein’s life was both long and well recorded… image location
Freie Presse 1858- 1859 In the summer of 1858, Dr. Canesius and Christian Schneider established in Alton a German weekly paper which bore the name of the Freie Presse. With the second issue the paper was transferred to Schneider, who continued publication for one year, when it was discontinued. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois by W.R. Brink & Co. 1882). image location
Freie Presse 1868- 1869 In May, 1868, a German paper named the Freie Presse was organized and issued by a joint stock company composed of leading Democrats of Belleville. Mr. Mueller was editor. It was a campaign paper and was published until the close of the canvass, and soon after, the press and material was purchased by Mr. Brickey of Red Bud and image location
Freie Wort 1893- 1897 (“Open Word”) Max Hempel, editor/publisher image location
Freiheitsbote fur Illinois 1840- 1844 The first German newspaper published in Illinois was Der Freiheitsbote fur Illinois, published in Belleville but printed in St. Louis. It appeared in the year 1840 during the Van Buren-Harrison campaign. The publisher was Theodore Engelmann, who in 1844 sold the publication to Bartholomeus Hauck, who suspended publication and moved the printery to Quincy, Illinois. (From the History of St. image location
Freiheitsbote fur Illinois und Missouri 1840 The first German newspaper published in Illinois was Der Freiheitsbote fur Illinois, published in Belleville but printed in St. Louis. It appeared in the year 1840 during the Van Buren-Harrison campaign. For three months was titled Freiheitsbote fur Illinois und Missouri. image location
Friedensbote 1850- 1958 "Messenger of Peace" Eden Publishing House, Evangelical Synod of North America, semi-monthly image location
Friedunsvate 1896 image location
The Front Rank 1914 ​Weekly Christian news magazine published by the Christian Board of Publication. image location
Funsten’s Reporter 1892 image location
Furniture Magazine 1880- 1888 F.H. Burgess, editor/publisher image location
Furniture Manufacturer 1879- 1884 "Official organ of St. Louis Furniture Exchange" Monthly. C.F. Anderson, editor/publisher. Var.: St. Louis Furniture Manufacturer. image location
Furniture News 1889- 1931 Monthly devoted to the furniture and kindred trade. Official organ of the St. Louis Furniture Board of Trade. Furniture Gazette Publishing Company. Var: St. Louis Furniture News image location
Furniture Review 1887- C.F. Anderson, editor/publisher. image location
Garden Forum 1938- 1951? Federated Garden Clubs of Missouri image location
Garden Life 1939? Published by the St. Louis Horticultural Society.  Dr. Cecil Conroy, editor. image location
Gateway Gardener 2004? Joyce Bruno, publisher. image location
Gateway Golf 1999 Promoting the game of golf in partnership with the Gateway PGA. Bill Burton, editor; John Stampley, publisher. image location
Gateway Heritage 1980- Quarterly journal of the Missouri Historical Society. image location
Gath-Rimmon 1880 The paper was founded in October, 1880, by Charles O. Wilson, editor and manager. The name means "The Exalted Press," and the publication (a sixteen-page pamphlet monthly) is "devoted to religious reform and the restoration of primitive Christianity." It especially advocates the prohibition of the liquor traffic and the suppression of all secret societies. (From the History of St. image location
Gay News Telegraph 1981- 2000 Also Gay and Lesbian News Telegraph;  News Telegraph. image location
Gazelle STL 2014- Quarterly women's magazine. Cillah Hall, editor/publisher. image location
Gazette 1838- 1847 Became Evening Mirror. Var:  Gazette, Evening Gazette, St. Louis (Daily, Evening, Weekly) Gazette. image location
Gazette Extraordinary 1812 image location
Geist Gemeinde 1913 German monthly image location
Geist und Gemuth 1896- 1910 Organ of an ideal world view. image location
Gem-Overland St. John Record 1925- 1932? Henry J. Halloway, editor; Gem Publishing Company image location
Gemeinde Bote 1899- 1940 "Church Messenger." Eden Publishing House. image location
General Practitioner 1895- 1897 Dr. G.M. Black founded this monthly publication which was sold to Drs. Pinckney French and C.H. Powell. It was absorbed by the Tri-State Medical Journal to become the Tri-State Medical Journal and Practitioner. image location
Gentleman Sportsman 1901 Weekly published by the Sportsman Publishng Company. H. W. Lanigan, editor. "Devoted to all classes of Gentlemen's Sport." "Contributions for publication are solicited from Sportsmen and Women and discussions of general interest will always be welcomed. Write on one side of paper only and give full name and address, not necessarily for publication but as a guarantee of good image location
German American Heinrich Wilhelm Gempp;  bi-lingual image location
Gesso 2019 Formerly Straight Up. Monthly arts and entertainment magazine. image location
The Gimlet 1913- 1916 The Gimlet is a small instrument with a point. A monthly magazine for hardware bosses and their clerks, published by Shapleigh Hardware. image location
Girls' Circle 1932 Christian Board of Publication Department of Young People's Literature. Weekly. image location
Globe Trotter 1914- 1915 Socialist. H.G. Creel, editor. image location
Globe-Democrat Commuter 1936- 1937 image location
Goldbeck's Musical Art 1883-1884 A practical exposition of the art of music, intended for the use of teachers of voice, piano and other musical instruments. Contains many original compositionss by Robert Goldbeck. image location
Golden Egg 1900- 1901 Poultry journal. M. Merceret, editor; Golden Egg Publishing Company. Became Poultry Investigator. image location
Golden Era 1851- 1855 Manford and Abbott, publishers. Weekly. image location
Golden Era Life 1882- 1886 Prohibition paper. Ben Deering, editor; Life Printing Company. image location
Good Impressions 1945- 1948 Associated Printers and Lithographers of St. Louis, Inc. image location
Good Templar 1865- 1868 The paper was established in Alton in 1865 and continued for three years. It was edited by B.H. Mills. It had been formerly published in St. Louis. Mr. Mills was an able writer. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois by W.R. Brink & Co. 1882). image location
Gottes Freund der Pfaffen Feind 1852?- 1864 ​Protestant paper originally edited and published by L.G. Besel.  image location
Grain Review 1881- 1883 In September, 1881, McClelland, Winter & McClelland established the Grain Review. The senior member of the firm was T.L. McClelland, formerly of the Pittsburgh Evening Chronicle. This is believed to be the only paper in the country exclusively devoted to the grain and elevator interests, and its specialty is the publication of statistics on the subject from the great image location
Grand Arsenal News 1922?- 1933? Official organ of the Grand-Arsenal Business Association. image location
Grand Gravois Booster 1928?- 1933? Official organ of the Grand-Gravois Business Association image location
Granite City Herald 1906 ​     image location
Granite City Post 1925 image location
Granite City Press 1903- 1908 image location
Granite City Press and Herald 1908- 1912 image location
Granite City Press-Record 1903- 1991 ​      image location
The Grape Culturist 1869- 1871 Monthly journal devoted to grape culture and wine making. George Husmann, editor; R.P. Studley & Company, publisher. image location
The Grape-Vine Telegram 1934- 1935 L.L.R. Richardson, editor. image location
Gravois News 1946- 1948 image location
Gravois-Chippewa Neighborhood News 1936? image location
The Gravois-Watson Times 1986- 1989 Don Corrigan, editor-in-chief. Published by Webster-Kirkwood Times, Inc. image location
Great American 1964- 1966 Quarterly of fact and opinion. Dr. F.G. Crowley, editor/publisher. image location
Great South 1887- 1888 Monthly. E.O.L. Edholm, editor/publisher image location
Great South-West 1875- 1885 W.H. Kerns, editor/publisher. The Great Southwest is devoted to illustrating and describing all that portion of the United States known as the Great Southwest, including the States of Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, Texas and Mexico. The emigrant can rely on the truthfulness of the statements herein contained. image location
Great West Illustrated 1880 Monthly illustrated publication focusing on local subjects. A.H. Echols & Co. editor/publisher. image location
The Great Western 1839- 1841 Prospectus for Publishing “The Great Western”             Convinced that the present prosperity and future prospects of this section of the State – its flourishing condition, and the inducements that are held out for the investment of capital in the various branches of Agriculture, Manufacture, and the Mechanic Arts; the fertility of the soil, and salubrity of climate, the increase image location
Greater Society St. Louis Magazine 1969 John Anaton, publisher; William H. Keenan, editor. image location
Greater St. Louis 1919- 1927 W.B. Weisenburger editor/ St. Louis Chamber of Commerce, publisher. image location
Greater St. Louis Bowling News and Sports Digest 1960- 1963? Monthly image location
Greater St. Louis Entertainment & Dining News 1974- 1975 Weekly. Lee Glasgow, editor. World Marketing Company. image location
Greater St. Louis Homes 1939- 1941 image location
Greater St. Louis Jewish Star 1954- 1955 Weekly. Charles Klotzer, editor/publisher. Var.: Jewish Star A Star Is Born With the trusting hope of the newborn, The Greater St. Louis Jewish Star enters the homes of the Jewish community to present a mosaic of thougjhts and activities. The responsibility of publishing a Jewish newspaper, any newspaper, rests mainly on self-control. The temptation to fuse the editorial and news image location
Greater St. Louis Magazine 1962- 1969 William Keenan, editor image location
Green Park Call 2001- 2004 Deborah Baker, publisher. image location
The Gridiron 1903- Gridiron Publishing Company. If men were called upon to formulate an excuse for their individual existence, the majority of them would be non-plussed. They would have no valid reasons to offer. It is with magazines as it is with men, but it is hoped by the editors to prove The Gridiron an exception to the general rule. In the image location
Griffin 2021- Newspaper of the Central West End Association published quarterly. Jeff Fister, publisher; Eileen Duggan, editor. image location
Grocer's Digest 1937- 1951 ​National monthly magazine for food retailers. Horace Barks, publisher. image location
The Guardian 1865- 1868 Catholic magazine dedicated to religion, literature, art, politics and general intelligence. James Clements, editor. image location
Gut Heil 1889- 1892 Official organ of the St. Louis Turnverein. Later named St. Louis Turner. image location
Hackstaff's Monthly 1880 George C. Hackstaff & Co., published two numbers of Hackstaff's Monthly in January and February, 1880. E.P. Wade was the editor. It was devoted to the graphic arts, general literature, the book and paper trade and miscellany. It was illustrated. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901) In January, 1880, appeared the first number of image location
Handel's Zeitung 1857- 1861 This is the only German newspaper west of New York that may be called a thorough commercial Journal. It was established by Mr. Robert Widman in 1857. It commenced in the very midst of great pecuniary pressure, but has met with the most sanguine success. It has doubled its size and has a large circulation. It is a weekly image location
Hardware World 1906- 1920 T.M. Sherman, editor. image location
Harness and Vehicle Dealer 1891- 1892 Monthly trade publication. image location
Harness Herald 1898- 1925 A journal devoted to technical instruction, trade news, and general information for the harness and saddler industry and its accessory branches. Johannes C.F. Jackson, editor; Jackson Publishing Company. image location
Harugari Amtsblatt 1885- ? ​     image location
Hausfreund 1851 (“Family Friend”) Weekly. Otto Wustrich, editor/publisher. image location
Health and Home 1895- 1898 Dr. W.H. Mayfield, publisher. A monthly journal devoted to domestic sanitation and personal health conditions for the lay reader. Became Surgical Retrospect. image location
Heartland 1960- 1962? Var: Heartland Journal. image location
Herald and Era 1860- ? Organ of the Universalist Church. image location
The Herald of Music 1897 Monthly devoted to music and musicians. Henry Spang, editor; C.F. Kelly, publisher. image location
Herald of Religious Liberty 1844- 1848 Rev. Hiram Chamberlain, editor and publisher. Supported Presbyterian church. image location
Herold des Glaubens 1850- 1920 The Herold des Glaubens (Herald of Faith) was established in 1850 by Franz Saler. In 1875 increasing years induced Mr. Saler to sell the paper, which then fell under the control of the German Printing and Publishing Association...The Herold des Glaubens is a Catholic German weekly journal, has over thirteen thousand circulation, and is the official organ of several image location
The Hesperian 1894- 1917 The Hesperian, an illustrated quarterly of seventy-two pages, edited and published by Alexander N. De Menil, made its appearance in May, 1894. Its prospectus announced the issue of "a magazine of a more serious character than any in present existence in the West;" it is a magazine of critical essays, "treating principally on literary, historical, philosophical and sociological topics;" it image location
Hibernian 1898- 1899 Weekly. image location
High School News 1894- Published monthly during the school year by the St. Louis High School Literary Societies. image location
High Tide 1932- ? image location
Hirlap 1913 Hungarian image location
Hlas 1873- 1905 (1945?) In 1873 the Bohemian Literary Society established Hlas (“The Voice”), edited by Rev. Joseph Heson. It is the organ of the Bohemian Catholics and is the only paper of that character in America. It is published monthly and is a six-column quarto. (From the History of St. Louis City and County by John Thomas Scharf, 1883). image location
Hobo News 1915- 1923 ​  Previously Hoboes' General Scout.  image location
Hoboes' General Scout 1913-1915 Published by the International Brotherhood Welfare Association. Renamed Hobo News in 1915. image location
Hodiamont Herald 1916- 1917 “A Home Paper for Home People” W.M. Barnum, publisher. image location
Hodiamont Notes 1906- Hodiamont Publishing Company Our Publication This, the initial issue of Hodiamont Notes, is published exclusively in the interest of Hodiamont, its business men and citizens, and its general welfare. The object of each succeeding issue will be the same. It is published by the Hodiamont Publishing Company, an organization of merchants, whose only aim is the upbuilding of the image location
Hodiamont-Bartmer Shopper 1931- ? Huneke, publisher image location
Home 1900- 1915 Monthly. Home Publishing Company. image location
Home and Family 1901- 1906 Monthly. Home Publishing Company. image location
Home and School Journal 1861 Monthly. J.L. Tracy, editor/Norman J. Colman, publisher. Lasted six months. image location
The Home Circle 1884- 1889? Published monthly for the instruction and entertainment of the family circle. Charles F. Haanel, publisher. Formerly Illustrated Monthly. image location
The Home Defender 1915 To disseminate the TRUTH in defense of St. Louis homes. Segregationist. United Welfare Association, publisher. image location
Home Journal 1867- 1872 Became Home Journal and Commercial Gazette. image location
Home Journal and Commercial Gazette 1872- 1873 “Devoted to literature, and the commercial and manufacturing interests of the Mississippi Valley.” Sheffield and Stone, proprietors.  Became Commercial Gazette. image location
The Home Library and Hearthstone Visitor 1851 Benjamin Bryan was the editor of this monthly journal of forty pages, magazine style, and Philip F. Coughlan was his assistant. Its articles consisted of original and selected articles on "Literature, Science, Art and Religion." The first number bore date of January, 1851. A few numbers only were issued. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De image location
The Home Press 1860- 1865? The Home Press - This is the name of a highly promising journal , born at the commencement of the year 1860, and under the charge of R.V. Kennedy, T.M. Halpin, and James Peckam. It is truly a family and literary paper, and the only one that can lay claim to that appellation west of the Mississippi. (From Edwards' Great West image location
Home, Farm and Factory 1883- 1895 An agricultural, mechanical and literary monthly. W.S. Robinson, editor/publisher. image location
Homestead 1897- 1899 Monthly. W.T. Tucker, editor/publisher. image location
Hornet 1880- 1882 The Hornet, a colored cartoon weekly of sixteen pages of four columns each, proffered its right antenna of friendship to the reading public on September 11, 1880, and met with a hearty response. A.B. Cunningham, a bright young journalist, resigned the city editorship of The Post-Dispatch to publish The Hornet. The humor of the paper was broader and more American than Puck's and its satirical image location
Horse Show Monthly 1895- 1906 Minnie McIntyre, editor. Merged with Sports of the Times (New York). image location
The Hostess 1906 Hostess Publishing Co.  image location
Hotel Reporter 1874- 1891? Publication of the Western Commercial Travelers’ Association. H.B. Wandell, editor. Var: Daily Hotel Register. image location
Howe's Monthly 1871 Howe's Monthly, William H. Howe, publisher, was a literary journal with the regulation "family departments" of the literary papers of the early [eighteen] seventies. The majority of its articles were well selected. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
Hrvatski Narod 1912- 1914 Ivan Mladineo, editor/ Croation Nation Publishing Company. image location
Humanity 1903- 1908 Monthly. Clifford Greve, editor. image location
The Humorist 1879- 1891? A weekly founded by Henry Hermanns. Wolf & Company, editor/publisher. Var.: St. Louis Humorist image location
Humphrey's Monthly Illustrated Scrapbook 1886- 1887 ​Joseph W. Sheppard, publisher. image location
Hustler 1888- 1892 Monthly image location
IAmEStL 2016- Charmaine Savage, editor/founder. The Magazine presents a positive media image of East St. Louis and the broad spectrum of East St. Louisans, well-known and unsung, who make us proud to say, “I Am East St. Louis”. image location
Il Pensiero 1904- Il Pensiero By Don Corrigan Letters of congratulations from aldermen, congressmen, diplomats and world leaders have been swamping Antonio Lombardo of South County. Typical of the salutations is one from President Bill Clinton, who congratulates Lombardo as publisher of Il Pensiero. The newspaper for the Italian community in St. Louis is celebrating its 90th birthday. “Your journal has faithfully reported image location
Illinois Advocate 1831- 1833 Formerly The Crisis Eighteen numbers of the paper were published by Samuel S. Brooks, when the office passed into the hands of Judge John York Sawyer. The latter gentleman had established the Western Ploughboy in Edwardsville November 1, 1830, and continued the publication one year, when he came into possession of the Advocate, and the two papers were consolidated under the name image location
Illinois Advocate 1848- 1852 Began in Lebanon, Il., as an organ of the Methodist Church. image location
Illinois Beobachter 1856- 1866 This Alton German weekly was founded by John Reis in June, 1856. It was the exponent of the principles and German organ of the Douglas wing of the Democratic party. Its founder continued its publication until March, 1863, when he died. V. Walter then became the editor and proprietor. He carried the paper over to the Republicans, defending Lincoln's image location
Illinois Beobachter 1844-1845 Published in Belleville. Became the Zeitung. image location
Illinois Business Journal 2000- Monthly publication based in Edwardsville. Alan Ortbals, owner. image location
Illinois Corrector 1827- 1828 In the summer of 1827, Mr. Robert K. Fleming moved a press and fixtures to Edwardsville, and on the 14th of October, 1827, issued the first number of the Illinois Corrector. It was in form a four column quarto, Democratic in politics, and warmly supported General Jackson for the presidency. It was published every Monday morning. Price per annum image location
Illinois Labor Press 1917- 1919 Published in East St. Louis Var: Illinois Labor Press and East St. Louis Sentinel. image location
Illinois Mercury 1839- 1840 Robert K. Fleming, publisher. Belleville. image location
Illinois Republican 1823- 1824 Formerly The Star of the West The first issue was made April 12, 1823. The mission of the Republican was to advcate the cause of the Convention party [which favored slavery in Illinois], and it was their recognized organ. The company was correctly supposed  to be composed of the following named gentlemen, and leaders of the pro-slavery party: Hon. Theophilus image location
The Illinois Republican 1849- 1852 Illinois Republican The name of the Belleville Times was changed to the Illinois Republican in 1849. It continued until October, 1852, when it was purchased by Judge N. Niles and was absorbed by the Advocate. (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois). Published weekly by Harvey & Walker. Belleville. image location
Illinois Republikaner 1872- 1873 This German newspaper was organized and established in June of 1872, and the first copy was issued issued July 1st of the same year. It was published by a company composed of Russell Hinckley, Sebastian Fietsam, Charles Stephani, Edward Rutz, Col. Thomas, and other representative and leading Republicans of St. Clair county. Henry Huhn was elected President of the image location
Illinois Temperance Herald 1836- 1842 The Illinois Temperance Herald was a monthly publication, the first number of which was issued June 1st, 1836, at Alton. A.W. Corey was the editor, assisted by Timothy Turner, a noted temperance worker and orator. It was a four column folio, published under the auspices of the Executive Committee of the Illinois Temperance Society. It reached a circulation of image location
Illo 2007- 2009 Daniel Zimmer, publisher. image location
Illustrated Graphic News 1886 Illustrated weekly published in several different cities. Var.: Graphic News image location
Illustrated Home Journal 1895- 1907 The Illustrated Home Journal began publishing in 1895, and belongs in the "popular literature class," containing stories, short papers, poems, and household, children's and humorous departments. It is generously illustrated but the German idioms that abound in its English content will preclude its ever becoming popular with the large classes of American readers. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri image location
Illustrated Journal of Agriculture 1860- 1878 The Illustrated Journal of Agriculture was issued in 1860 as a monthly, by W.V. Wolcott and John S. Marmaduke...It went through several hands during the next few years and finally passed into the possession of Philip Chew, who consolidated it with The Weekly Missouri Farmer of Boonville. Its name was changed to The Journal of Agriculture and Farmer. (From the Encyclopedia of the History image location
Illustrated Monthly 1885- 1896 Charles F. Haanel & H.B. Crucknell, publishers. Var: Illustrated Monthly Magazine. Renamed The Home Circle image location
Illustrated Monthly Railway News 1873-1874 Will Conklin, editor. image location
The Illustrated Scrap Book of Art and Literature 1887 W.R. Hodges, editor; Jos. W. Sheppard, publisher. image location
Illustration 2001- ​Daniel Zimmer, editor/publisher       image location
Illustration '05 2005 ​Two quarterly issues were published. Daniel Zimmer, publisher. Name changed to Illo. image location
Illustrirte Abendschule 1834- ? ​      image location
Image 1972- image location
Immigration and Investment Journal 1886? image location
The Imperial 1900- 1905 A fraternal magazine published semi-monthly image location
Imperial State 1881- 1882 M.S. Fife, editor. Published by the State Board of Immigration. Monthly "Devoted to immigration, agriculture, stock raising, wool growing and manufacturing interests." Discontinued after five issues. image location
The Impressario 1872- 1873 A monthly magazine devoted to music, literature and art. John W. Butler, editor; Bellman and Schatzman, publishers. image location
Independent Clarion 1914- 1922 Negro publication. C.K. Robinson and Associates. Var.: Clarion. image location
Independent Democrat 1842 W.T. Yeomans, editor. Ceased publication after a few issues. image location
Independent Livestock Reporter 1904- 1905 James MacCallum, publisher. Daily. image location
Independent Merchant 1946- 1948 Monthly. M.K. Summers, editor/ publisher image location
Independent News 1987- ? Bob Lindsey, editor/publisher. Weekly North County news. image location
Industrial Advocate 1866- 1867? Weekly​      image location
Industrial New Era 1892- 1894? Populist publication. G.A. Jones, editor; Percy Pepoon & John C. Denton, publishers. image location
Industrial Times 1894- 1901 Weekly. Industrial Times Publishing Company. image location
Industrialist 1880- 1887 Weekly. Samuel Archer, editor. Industrialist Publishing Company. image location
The Inland 1890- 1902? Illustrated Christian Endeavor Monthly. Rev. William M. Jones, editor. Alden Publishing. image location
Inland Journal of Education 1890- 1892 Monthly except August image location
The Inland Monthly 1872- 1878 The Inland Monthly Magazine, Miss Mary Nolan and Mrs. Charlotte Smith, editors and proprietors, made its appearance in March, 1872. During the first half year of its existence each number contained forty-eight pages of selected literary items, reprinted English stories, society gossip, "write-ups" of business men and commercial firms, lithographic portraits, local biographies, etc. Its only contributors were L.U. Reavis and image location
Intelligencer 1850- 1857 Var: St. Louis Intelligencer, Daily St. Louis Intelligencer, Weekly St. Louis Intelligencer. image location
Intermezzo 1905- 1907 A musical monthly. Contained editorial material and sheet music. John Stark, a music publisher, owned the periodical's publisher, The Intermezzo Co. image location
Intermezzo (2) 1941- 1959 St. Louis Philharmonic Society image location
Intermission 1989- ? Intermission Is RebornBy Joe Pollack                         This entertainment newspaper has had various managements through the years and recently was re-formed as a not-for-profit organization. It’s being published again, under the aegis of Michael O’Brien, dedicated and hard-working. His newspaper covers lots of theater of all types, college, amateur, semi-professional and professional, at venues throughout the area. And the publication also image location
International 1890 image location
Interstate Grocer 1889- 1915 Grocers' Journal Company. "A weekly journal devoted to the interests of the general grocery trade and indorsed [sic] by the Associated Wholesale Grocers of St. Louis." image location
Interstate Manufacturer 1895- 1901 Semi-monthly. St. Louis Manufacturer Publishing Company. image location
Interstate Medical Journal 1893- 1917 Monthly general medical journal, with special emphasis on railway surgery. J.B. Ball, editor; Tri-State Medical Journal Company, publisher. image location
Investor 1901- 1906 A.R. Rivert, editor/Investor Publishing Company. A weekly journal of finance and kindred interests. image location
Invincible 1913- 1914 History magazine. Anita Calvert Bourgeoise, editor image location
Irish & American Review 1987- Mike Olds, editor. image location
Irish Advocate 1852 image location
Italian Press 1926 ​Claudio Delitala, publisher. image location
Italian Weekly 1926 image location
Jackpot 1952- ? Bi-monthly cartoon magazine published by Youthful Magazines, Inc. image location
Jefferson-Gravois 1925?- 1935? image location
The Jeffersonian 1825- 1826 St. Charles. Calvin Gunn and William Dunnica. Moved to Jefferson City when the state capital moved in 1826 and became known as the Jeffersonian Republican. image location
Jennings Bulletin 1916 L.E. Forrest, editor/publisher. image location
Jennings News 1946- 1967 Byron Davis, publisher; Jean Davis, editor image location
Jet Lag 1979- ? My Jet Lag MemoriesToby Weiss I came into their scene in the fall of 1988 by submitting a photo and review of 2 different shows at Mississippi Nights: The Ramones and The Church. This contribution paled in comparison to my graphic layout and typesetting background, so John the Mailman Korst instantly promoted me to Associate Editor for issue #84. By image location
Jeweler 1884- 1886 Trade journal. Jewelers Mutual Publishing Company. image location
Jewish Community News 1979- ? Formerly Southern Illinois Jewish Community News. image location
Jewish Daily Forward Var: Forward image location
Jewish Daily Press 1911- 1916 G.A. Braudes, editor; Jewish Daily Press Publishing Company. image location
Jewish Daily Record 1927- 1951 Former Jewish Record. "The Jewish Record, established in St. Louis in 1913, is pleased to announce that beginning with May 1, 1927, it will appear as a DAILY PAPER. The Jewish Record, only paper printed in Yiddish in St. Louis." image location
The Jewish Express 1904 Express Publishing Company image location
Jewish Free Press 1885- 1887 Henry Gersoni, editor/publisher. "The subscription price of the Jewish Free Press is two dollars per annum, from which a deduction of fifty cents is made if paid in advance...We do not necessarily indorse the views of our correspondents."  image location
Jewish Light 1947- ? image location
Jewish Record 1913- 1927 Sol Goldman, editor.  Became Jewish Daily Record image location
Jewish Star 1954- 1955 Weekly edited and published by Charles Klotzer. Var.: Greater St. Louis Jewish Star image location
Jewish Tribune 1879- 1884 In 1879, Godlove, Fredman & Wolfner established the Jewish Tribune. Sunsequently it became the property of Rev. D. Sonnenschein and Rev. Mr. Spitz, who were its editors. The Tribune was originally devoted to society matters among the Hebrews, but Messrs. Sonnenschein & Spitz made it largely a theological paper. Finally it was bought by M.C. Reefer, who is business image location
Jewish Voice 1888- 1933 The Jewish Voice Company, publisher; Rabbi M. Spitz, editor/publisher. image location
Jewish World 1991- ? Scott Rose, editor/publisher. Monthly. image location
Joker’s Budget and Mysteries 1851- 1856 Rufus M. Underwood, publisher/editor. Weekly humor/scandal sheet. image location
Journal 1857- 1878 Var: St. Louis Daily Journal; St. Louis Weekly Journal. Merged with St. Louis Daily Times, becoming the St. Louis Times Journal. image location
Journal 1914 Robert Lindsay, editor; A.M. Donnelly, publisher. image location
Journal of Agriculture 1906- 1913 Lewis Publications. image location
Journal of Agriculture 1856- 1895, 1916- 1921 N.D. Thompson, editor; L.D. Morse & Company, publisher. Var. Illustrated Journal of Agriculture; Journal of Agriculture & Farmer; Farmer’s Advertiser; Mississippi Valley Democrat & Journal of Agriculture. Name expanded to Journal of Agriculture and Farmer.  R.B. Studley & Company, publisher. image location
Journal of Agriculture and American Stock Breeder 1866- 1886 "The largest paper of its kind in the West...acknowledged by press and people to be the best breeders' paper, the best farmers' paper and the best family paper." Weekly. Phillip Chew, editor/publisher. Became Journal of Agriculture. image location
Journal of Agriculture and Farmer 1878- 1883 Chew, Cordell & Company, publisher. After a year Mr. Cordell (who was a farmer) retired, and for two years Chew & Harness conducted the paper, but in 1878 Mr. Chew bought Harness out, and has been the sole publisher ever since. During most of the time of Mr. Chew's connection with the paper he has had the absolute management.  image location
Journal of Agriculture and Star Farmer 1856- 1916 H.L. Wells, editor. Became Journal of Agriculture. image location
The Journal of Commerce 1861- 1880 Originally published in German under the name Mississippi Handels Zeitung, the Journal switched to English in 1861. In 1866, owner Robert M. Widmart (possibly Widman) died and the paper was purchased by Wolcott & Hume. They sold it to The Journal of Commerce Company in 1878, and in 1880 the name was changed to The Age of Steel. image location
Journal of Education 1868- 1871 J.B. Merwin, editor/publisher. Became American Journal of Education. image location
The Journal of Speculative Philosophy 1867- 1893 The Journal of Speculative Philosophy, Professor William T. Harris, LL. D., editor and proprietor, was the highest-class periodical ever issued in St. Louis.While its name prevented the masses of readers of periodical literature from even examining it, its contents display the fact that literature, art, science and music were familiar topics of treatment. It was issued quarterly; the first number image location
Journal of the Association of Engineering Societies - 1915 Published by the Board of Managers, Association of Engineering Societies image location
Journal-Illinois Sportsman 1929 Clarence W. Meyer, publisher; H.G. Norcross, contributing editor. image location
Katholisches Sonntagsblatt 1850- 1889 Edited by Father P. Martin Seidel, a St. Louis Jesuit. Publication’s name was changed to Herold des Glaubens in 1889. image location
Kirkwood Advertiser 1951?- 1971? Jacob Wolf, editor. Countian Publishing Company image location
Kirkwood Leader 1887?- 1889? Cortez A. Kitchen, Publisher (local grocer) image location
Kirkwood Messenger 1928?- 1959? “Devoted to the interests of the fastest growing section of Missouri.”   David Lee Jones, owner and publisher; Elizabeth Jones, editor. image location
Kirkwood Monitor 1915?- 1944? “For the permanent upbuilding of Kirkwood and vicinity, first, last and all the time.”  John A. Jacaty, editor and proprietor. image location
Kirkwood Tablet 1908?- ? “An independent newspaper that will print the news.” Motto: “Progress and publicity” The Tablet, a weekly published in Kirkwood, presents a workmanlike appearance and provides a superior class of reading matter. (Originally published in the History of St. Louis County by William L. Thomas, 1911). image location
Kirkwood Weekly Courier 1912?- 1919? “There’s Always Room At the Top”  Steve J. Harris, editor and business manager. image location
Kirkwood Weekly Mail 1878? image location
Kladderadatsch 1890- 1891? Victor Sarner, editor image location
The Klan Kourier 1924- 1928 Weekly. Gail S. Carter, publisher. image location
Korean American Journal 1991- ? Kye S. Lee, editor/publisher. Monthly image location
Kosmopolit 1847? image location
Krieger-Zeitung 1885- 1892? (“Warrior Newspaper”) image location
Kunkel's Musical Review 1878- 1909 Kunkel's Musical Review was founded by the Kunkel Brothers - Charles and Jacob - in September, 1878. It was a small-sized, twenty-two page monthly. J. Temple was its editor. The following year it was enlarged, and I.D. Foulon became its editor. He was succeeded by Thomas M. Hyland. The paper continued to grow, and by the end of the century image location
Kunst und Literatur Blatt (“History of Art and Literature Paper”)  Dr. Brown, editor.  image location
La Lega Italiana 1914- 1921 G. & R.A. Nicolais, editors/publishers. Italian League Publishing Company. image location
La Republique 1876- 1877 French weekly, possibly published in Boston for a time. H. Beauregard, publisher. image location
La Tribune Francaise 1866- 1871? La Tribune Francaise made its bow October 22, 1866. It was published by a society, of which G. Morhard seems to have been the head. This society, it its fierce democracy, had not president, secretary or other officers, as implied authority was aristocratic. The Tribune paid more attention than any of its predecessors to local and American politics. It sought to be image location
La Union de America 1886 Spanish monthly. Pedro Leon, publisher. image location
La Voz 2006- ? Paper for local Hispanic population published in English and Spanish image location
Labor 1900- 1915 Labor Publishing Company. image location
Labor 1893- 1896 Labor Publishing Association. Var.: St. Louis Labor image location
Labor Campaign 1894 Weekly. City Central Committee Socialist Labor Party, publisher. Official campaign organ of the Socialist Labor Party of St. Louis. image location
Labor Compendium 1896- 1911? Publication of the National Building Trades Council of America. “Eight hours’ work eight hours’ sleep, eight hours’ recreation.”  N.W. Steinbiss, editor and publisher. Var: Weekly Compendium. image location
Labor News 1894 Albert E. Sanderson, editor; Socialist Newspaper Union image location
Labor News 1904- 1911 R.F. Sass, editor/publisher. image location
Labor News Review 1922- 1965 The original and oldest labor paper in St. Clair and Madison Counties. Dedicated to militant service to the organized labor movement. image location
The Labor Tribune 1936- Labor Tribune Breaking News By Eliot Porter             Has the Labor Tribune, the slender weekly tabloid organ of the AFL-CIO in the St. Louis region, become more newsy? Is it running more echt-news stories of general interest in addition to the puff pieces about union officials and the politicians who support them?             Or, is it mostly an illusion, image location
Labor’s Call 1977?- 1999? Published bi-monthly image location
Lacherlich 1879- 1880 (“Comical”) Weekly German humor magazine. image location
Ladies and Gents 1969 Willie Feagin, editor. “News of Beauticians, Barbers, Business” Black-owned, published twice a month. image location
Ladies’ Pearl 1852- 1884 The Ladies' Pearl was a monthly publication, issued at Alton, and published in the interest and under the auspices of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Dr. J.B. Logan and Rev. W.W. Brown were the editors. It was started in the summer of 1857 and continued until the breaking out of the war in 1861 when it suspended. (From The History of image location
Ladue News 1980- Advertisers Are the News in the Pages of the Ladue News By Dawn Grodsky             Most papers do their best to separate advertising from editorial copy. But the Ladue News, a free circulation tabloid, promotes its advertisers throughout the paper. In fact, after looking over various issues from the past two years, one would draw the conclusion that the Ladue image location
Lafayette Marquis 1977- ? Monthly neighborhood newsletter published by the Lafayette Square Restoration Committee. image location
Lafayette Square Meter 1972-1976 Monthly paper serving the Lafayette Square neighborhood in the city. image location
Landwirth 1889- 1892 Monthly farm publication. W. Wernich, editor; German Printing and Publishing Association, publisher. Moved to Milwaukee in 1892. image location
The Laryngoscope 1896- This monthly founded by Dr. Frank M. Rumbold was published by the American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc. image location
Las Dos Naciones 1894- 1920 Ev. E. Carreras, publisher image location
The LaSalle Journal 1872- 1873 The LaSalle Journal, a literary and religious monthly, was begun in January, 1872, by George A. Schuette, A.B., now a member of the order of the Christian Brothers. In 1873 it was changed to a magazine form and the word "Journal" dropped from its title. It lived about two years; its articles were nearly all by young writers. (From the Encyclopedia of image location
Le Courier de Saint Louis 1850- May have been the first French-language newspaper published in St. Louis. E. Ferrence, editor. image location
Le Courrier de St. Louis 1866 Le Courrier de St. Louis, L. Philipon, publisher, lived through a few months in 1866. It was a weekly. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1902). image location
Le Journal Francais de St. Louis 1893 Le Journal Francais de St. Louis was edited by proprietor A. de Vervins. Seven weekly numbers only were issued, the first of which bore date of March 22, 1893. It was independent politically, advocated religious freedom, and was more French than American in its sympathies. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1902). image location
Le Patriote 1878- 1887 The first number of Le Patriote was issued in September, 1878, by Louis C. Lavat, a printer. Ireneus D. Foulon, A.M., LL. B., was its first editor. It was published weekly, and was devoted to local and general news, commercial and political matters, and literature. In the winter of 1879, Dr. Chartier ("Karl Melite") became its editor, and the paper image location
Le Telegraphie 1840 Semi-weekly. Cortambert Vergnes, publisher. image location
Leader 1855- 1858 The Leader, a weekly literary, political and family paper, made its appearance March 10, 1855. It was issued by a Catholic literary society and edited by Jedidiah V. Huntington...In 1856, The Leader became a daily. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). Although begun as a paper with Catholic leanings, the content became more focused on politics. image location
The Leader 1886- 1894 Kirkwood. Became the Suburban Leader. image location
Legal News 1868- 1907 Merged with Commercial Lawyer in 1902 image location
Legal Record 1861- 1866 Daily. Var.: St. Louis County Legal Record and Advertiser image location
The Legion Monthly Magazine 1884 The Legion Monthly Magazine, beyond containing a department devoted to the interests of the Legion of Honor, was purely literary. It was illustrated and contained forty-eight pages of reading matter...Seven numbers of The Legion appeared in 1884. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
Lehre und Wehre 1855- 1929 (“Instruction and Resistance”) A theological and ecclesiastical contemporary monthly paper. C.F.W. Walther, editor; German-Evangelical Lutheran Synod, editor/publisher. image location
Les Talk 1991- 1992? The magazine for empowering lesbians/womyn image location
Lesbian and Gay News Telegraph 1980?- 1999 Jim Thomas, editor image location
Liberal Democrat 1872- 1878 A.W. Angier left the employ of The Collinsville Argus, where he had served as editor, and began the Liberal Democrat. The first number was issued October 10th, 1872. It was an eight column paper, Democratic in politics​. The presses and type of the office were removed to Edwardsville in 1878. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois by W.R. Brink & image location
Liberia Advocate 1846- 1849? Liberia Advocate of the Valley of the Mississippi This paper is issued about the middle of every month by Messrs. LORD & McKEE. The editorial management is under the conduct of Rev. R.S. Finly, Secretary and Agent of the Missouri Colonization Society, assisted by a number of gentlemen friendly to the cause of African Colonization. The design of this image location
Library Docket 1873- 1879 Monthly. Soule, Thomas and Wentworth, publisher. image location
Lichlputze 1852- 1878? image location
Life 1882- 1885 image location
Life 1888- 1895 Pictorial image location
Life Insurance Selling 1925- Commerce Publishing image location
Light 1947- 1963 Jewish Welfare Fund of St. Louis. Var: St. Louis Light. image location
Light In the West 1880- 1886 Published by the St. Louis Spiritual Association. "Free and open discussion is invited on all questions which tend to advance truth and right. Writers will be held responsible for their theories. Names must always be attached to communications as a guarantee of good faith, but may be withheld by request." image location
Lightning Express 1880 J.B. Follet, editor/publisher. Negro newspaper. Var. St. Louis Lightning Express image location
Lightning-Rod Herald 1868- 1878? Monthly. Cole Brothers, publisher. Became the St. Louis Herald. Var.: Daily Fair Herald image location
Limelight 1987 Upbeat Limelight Out to Cover “Good” NewsBy Robert Lowes             Photographs of physicians, businessmen, politicians, attorneys and athletes – virtually all black – abound in Limelight Magazine, a new monthly publication aimed at the St. Louis black community.             Billing itself as “a Society Publication for St. Louis,” Limelight exists to inform St. Louis that there is more to the image location
Listy 1902- ? Bohemian. Var: St. Louiske Listy image location
Literary Galaxy 1877 Literary content. image location
The Little Episcopalian 1880 This monthly journal was edited and published by Dr. A.M. Powell at Collinsville. The first number was printed in March, 1880. On the first of October its name was changed to the Banner of the Cross. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois by W.R. Brink & Co. 1882). image location
Little Sower 1865- 1906 A monthly magazine for young people from the Christian Publication Company. W. W. Dowling, editor/publisher. image location
The Little Watchman 1870- 1875 image location
Live Stock and Commercial Record 1876 Weekly. Philip McCahill, publisher. image location
Live Stock Reporter and Weekly Price List 1872 Powell and Maynard, publishers. “The Oldest Live Stock Paper West of the Mississippi.”   Var.: St. Louis Live Stock Reporter and Weekly Price List. Became Livestock and Tobacco Review, then St. Louis Livestock and Produce Review  (1877 Cuthbert Powell, publisher). image location
Locomotive and Missouri and Illinois Gazette 1838 Weekly, short-lived. Political, agricultural and commercial news. image location
Log Cabin Hero 1840 Campaign paper published by New Era. Paschall & Ramsey, editors. image location
Louie 2000- 2007 The magazine for St. Louis Teens. Positive Image Communications Company. image location
The Louisiana Gazette 1809- 1812 1809  J. Charless, editor. A continuation of the Missouri Gazette. Name reverted in 1812. Charless informed his readers of the name change in the November 30, 1809 issue: "On enlarging the Gazette we have taken the liberty to alter the title from a local to one more general." image location
Love's Medical Mirror 1890- 1907 Love's Medical Mirror was founded in 1890, by I.N. Love, M.D., as a monthly reflector of the science of medicine, in the interests of practitioners. Dr. Love had much experience with medical journals in an editorial and contributory way. His election in 1890 to the presidency of the American Medical Editors' Association made such a journal as the Mirror a necessity. (From image location
Lumber 1924 Willard C. Howe, editor. Journal of Commerce Company. Became Lumber Manufacturer and Dealer. image location
Lumber Manufacturer and Dealer 1924- 1929 James E. Gatewood, editor; Commercial Journal Company. image location
The Lumberman 1880- 1904 Published by the Journal of Commerce Company, The monthly Lumberman was devoted to the lumber, sawmill and woodworking interests of the West and South. Var.: St. Louis Lumberman image location
Luminary 1854- 1855 Erastus Snow, editor and publisher. “Devoted to Science, Religion, General Intelligence and News of the Day”  offices in basement of chapel at the corner of Fourth Street and Washington Avenue. Var: St. Louis Luminary image location
Lutheran 1848- 1960? Begun by Rev. F.W. Walther. Var: St. Louis Lutheran image location
Lutheran Witness 1882- 1914 Monthly. Rev. C.A. Frank, editor/publisher. Concordia Publishing House image location
Lutheran Witness Reporter 1965- 1975 ​ Concordia Publishing House.     image location
Lutherische Kranken und Waisenfreund 1885- 1938 German monthly published by the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod image location
Lutherische Zionsbote 1896- German Lutheran paper published by Louis Lange Publishing Company. image location
Lutherisches Kinder und Jugendblatt 1872- 1896 Concordia Publishing Company image location
Madison County Advertiser 1856- 1865 Founded by James R. Brown, the paper made its first issue June 26, 1856. Mr. Brown issued four numbers, when the office passed into the possession of O.C. Dake, Esq. Subsequently Joseph L. Krafft assumed control, and from him it was transferred to William G. Pinchard, Jr. In 1860 the latter sold it to Col. Frank Springer, and he image location
Madison County Anzeiger 1875- 1878 The Madison County Anzeiger was a German paper printed at Edwardsville. The first issue was made May 7, 1875. The publishers were C. Lohmann & Son, C. Lohmann, editor. The Anzeiger was at first Independent in politics, but in the political campaign of 1876 it supported Hayes and Wheeler, and from that time on until it discontinued it was image location
Madison County Bote 1869- 1873 The paper, originally published in Highland, Ill., was moved by owner B.E. Hoffman to Edwardsville in June, 1869. Mr. Hoffman edited and published the paper until 1870, then sold it to E.G. Wolf and Frank Haag. They continued until 1873 when they failed, and the publication was suspended. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois, by W.R. Brink & Co. 1882). image location
Madison County Courier 1865- 1869 The first number was issued at Edwardsville October 12th, 1865, under the ownership of Messrs. Whitman & Crabb. Crabb soon retired from the partnership, and Whitman continued the publication until October 5th, 1869, when he sold the material to S.V. Crossman, editor and proprietor of the Republican. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois by W.R. Brink & Co. 1882). image location
Madison County Enquirer 1853- 1856 The date of the first issue  was at Edwardsville, March 26, 1853. Theodore Terry was the editor. He was not a very able writer; his habits were none of the best, and he lost caste among the good people of Edwardsville and vicinity. His paper suspended in 1856, and from its ruins sprang the Madison Press. (From The History of image location
Madison County News 1933- 1938 Formerly Edwardsville Republican image location
Madison County News 1963- 1965 image location
Madison County Sentinel 1879- ? The paper, based in Alton, was founded October 15, 1879, by James. J. McInerney. image location
Madison Intelligencer 1862- 1992 Became Edwardsville Intelligencer. image location
Madison Press 1858- 1861 Became Madison Advertiser. image location
Madison Record 1850- 1851 The first issue was made at Edwardsville, February 14th, 1850. Messrs. Dallam & Ruggles were the editors and publishers. In November of the same year Dallam retired, and his place was taken by Lemuel E. Smith. On the 19th of December the firm underwent another change. Ruggles retired and David Gillespie, Esq. became a partner with Smith, and editor image location
Madison Republic and Tribune 1861- 1862 image location
Madison Republic and Tribune 1905-1941 image location
Madison Weekly Advertiser 1859- 1861 image location
The Mail 1877- 1878 Kirkwood   “Official Paper of St. Louis County”  Weekly Mail Company. Var.: Weekly Mail. “The first newspaper in St. Louis County after the Separation [City/County] was called the Weekly Mail and its first issue was dated January 31, 1877. It antedated the St. Louis County News just two days. The Weekly Mail’s salutatory was written by Philip H. Thomas, a man image location
Manchester-Chouteau Neighborhood News 1934?- 1946? image location
Manford's New Monthly Magazine 1861- 1896 image location
Manford’s Monthly Magazine 1856- 1861 Erasmus and Mrs. H.B. Manford. Monthly journal with Universalist slant devoted to liberal principles Became Manford’s New Monthly Magazine. image location
Maplewood Champion 1912- 1914? “Principle, Unity and Progress”  Maplewood Publishing Company. Steve J. Harris, managing editor.  Merged with Maplewood News in 1914. image location
Maplewood Herald 1911? “Official organ of local Maplewood Socialist Party.”  Miss Lydia Pleis, editor and proprietor image location
Maplewood Journal 1911- ? weekly image location
Maplewood News 1909- 1919? “For the permanent upbuilding of Maplewood first, last and all the time.”  Miss Lydia Pleis, proprietor; John E. Sallee, editor. Merged with Maplewood Champion in 1914. image location
Maplewood News-Champion 1914- 1935 A.W. Syrett, editor. Var: News-Champion. image location
Maplewood Observer 1934- 1951 Leslie Crowe, editor; A.E. Rosenblatt, publisher. Var: St. Louis County Observer. image location
Maplewood Regulator 1906 W.M. Barnum, editor/publisher. image location
Mardi Gras News 1889 one issue image location
Mark Twain Journal 1956?- Fromerly the Mark Twain Quarterly. Cyril Clemens, editor-in-chief. image location
Mark Twain Quarterly 1935- ? Became the Mark Twain Journal. Published by the International Mark Twain Society. image location
Market Reporter 1866- 1869 Became St. Louis Daily Market Reporter. image location
Max 2017- CEO/Owner: Darin Slyman image location
Meat Merchandising 1925- 1958 The national trade paper dedicated to more profitable retail meat sales and service. H.G. Heitzenberg, editor. Merged with Food Merchandising. image location
Medical Advisor 1900- 1901 Monthly journal of medicine and surgery. Martin F. Engman, editor. image location
Medical Archives 1868- 1873 Monthly. J. C. Whitehill editor. image location
Medical Brief 1873- 1929 The Medical Brief has grown from thirty-two pages, when it was first issued in 1873, to 162 pages. It favors no school or particular method, but seeks to place before its readers all that comes approved, from whatever source, in practical medicine and surgery. It claims, and with ample reason, the largest circulation of any medical journal in the world. J.J. image location
Medical Business Journal 1987- 1993 Published by Kirkland & Masterson, Ltd., Thomas P. Masterson, editor. Devoted to the business issues that relate to professional practitioners in the St. Louis area. image location
Medical Era 1904- 1912 Dr. S.C. Martin, M.D., editor/publisher. Var: St. Louis Medical Era. Merged with Medical Review. image location
Medical Fortnightly 1892- 1914 The Medical Fortnightly was established January 1, 1892, by Dr. Bransford Lewis. In 1895 the Fortnightly Press Company was organized, and Dr. Lewis, who found the duties of editorial management were diverting too much of his attention from his practice. was relieved from active service, and Dr. Frank Parsons Norbury was placed in charge of the editorial department, with Dr. image location
Medical Fortnightly and Laboratory News 1914- 1919 T.A. Hopkins, M.D., & R.B.H. Gradwohl, M.D., editors. image location
Medical Gazette 1898- ? The Medical Gazette, monthly, first appeared in June, 1898, Martin F. Engman, M.D., managing editor and proprietor. It covers all fields of medical and surgical science through departments conducted by staff writers and collaborators. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri edited by Howard L. Conard, 1901). Var: St. Louis Medical Gazette. image location
Medical Mirror 1890- 1907 L.N. Love, editor. Var: Love’s Medical Mirror. Merged into Medical Era. "Besides medical articles included biographical material on doctors, light essays, poetry, and other items of general interest. Dr. Love moved to New York, and beginning in September 1900, the magazine was published in both places." D.G. Holland image location
Medical Review 1875- 1915 Robert Luedeking, editor; J.H. Chambers & Company. Var: St. Louis Medical Review. image location
MeKeel's Drummer 1901 Thirteen issues published. An irregular publication of the C.H. Mekeel Stamp and Publishing Company. image location
Melting Pot 1913?- 1920 Socialist   Henry M. Tichenor, editor; Phil Wagner, publisher. “No organization, political or religious, is responsible for anything that goes into the Melting Pot. Pile all your cussin’ on the editor.” image location
The Merchant, Miller and Manufacturer 1885?- 1890? Monthly. A.R. Rivet, editor; Valley Publishing. image location
Merchants Exchange Price Current 1856- 1872? Thomas Rhodus, publisher. image location
Merchants Journal 1901?- 1902? ​W.B. Harris, editor. Var.: St. Louis Merchants Journal. image location
The Merchants' Manifest 1876 The Merchants' Manifest was established in 1876 by the Merchants' Manifest Company. It is published every forenoon, giving the receipts by rail and river for the twenty-four hours preceding. M.J. Lee is manager. (From the History of St. Louis City and County by John Thomas Scharf, 1883). image location
The Messenger 1907- Belleville Diocese publication. image location
Metro-East Journal 1964- 1979 Metro-East Journal Bids You GoodbyeBy Larry Spohn             One of the more depressing chores at the Metro-East Journal over the years was writing the obituary of yet another business to shut down or leave the East St. Louis area. On March 30, the paper had the bitter experience of writing one last obit – its own.             “Metro-East Journal bids image location
Metropolitan Record - 1864 The Metropolitan Record was a weekly journal published in the interests of the "Confederate States of America." It was suppressed by the Federal authorities in 1864. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
MetroVoice 1989- ? Metrovoice Passes Plate By Don Corrigan             Metrovoice, a monthly which bills itself as the St. Louis Christian news and events publication, is apparently falling on hard times. Its the lead story in the July issue is a blatant appeal for money.             Readers are given 10 ways to raise dough for the publication, including a request to your local image location
Mid-Continent 1886- 1896? A.E. Taylor, editor; Presbyterian Newspaper Company.  Previously the Evangelist. image location
Mid-continent Banker 1918- Commerce Publishing image location
Mid-West Radio Magazine 1925- Monthly. Arthur M. Hull, editor. Promoting interests of radio dealers and users. The Mid-West Radio Magazine is devoted to promoting the best interests of radio dealers and the public in the prosperous middle west and southwestern states.  image location
Midland Industrial Gazette 1866- 1886? Weekly record of the industrial and mechanical progress of the West, South and Southwest, published by Midland Publishing Company. Formerly the St. Louis Commercial Gazette. image location
Midland Magazine 1894- 1897 Owner Tobias Mitchell changed the publication's name from St. Louis Illustrated when he purchased the magazine in 1894. Mr. Mitchell sold it to a stock company in 1896, and it finally suspended in December, 1897. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). Var: Midland Monthly Magazine. image location
Midtown Voice 1982- 1983 Weekly community newspaper of Midtown St. Louis. Thomas Tobin, editor; Robert J. Byrne, publisher image location
The Midwest Horseman 1980- 1983? Specialty publication for equestrian interests. image location
Midwest Labor World 1943- 1963? Official organ of St. Louis Joint Council URWDSEA-CIC image location
Midwest Motorist 1971- Missouri Auto Club news. image location
Mill Boy 1844- 1845 Weekly campaign publication supporting Whig party candidate Henry Clay. A.B. Chambers and George Knapp, publishers. image location
The Mill Creek Valley Intelligencer 1968- 1971 ​      image location
Mind Your Business 1923- 1948? image location
Miner and Artisan 1865 image location
The Miner and Workman’s Advocate 1863- 1867 In the spring of 1863, John Hinchcliffe commenced the publication in Belleville of a journal bearing the above name. It was specially devoted to the interests of the miners, mechanics and producing classes. It rose rapidly in public favor and soon had a large circulation. During the first year of its existence its circulation had become so large that image location
Mines, Metals and Arts 1874- 1878 Mines, Metals, and Arts was the name of an eight-page quarto weekly established early in 1874 by Charles E. Ware & Co. Joseph E. Ware, a mining engineer of fine attainments, was the editor. The publication possessed many excellencies and came to be regarded as a promising property, but after about three and a half years' existence the proprietors, image location
Mining News 1887 Devoted to the interests of St. Louis and the Great West. George G. Bain, editor. Var.: St. Louis Mining News image location
The Minute Man 1922- 1923 “We fight against the treasonable malice of fanaticism and intolerance with the same indomitable spirit that the Minute Men of old fought against the intolerable bonds of human slavery.” image location
Mirror 1891 Frances Barnett Roper By W.A. Kelsoe One of the few women writers on the Star in the early years of its existence and the only one when I worked on the paper in 1890 was Mrs. Frances Barnett Roper, who had joined City Editor Reedy’s staff in 1888. She was a graduate of Pritchett Institute, Glasgow, Mo.,…The Mirror, founded image location
The Mirror 1980- ? Quality Writing Will Guide Newsmagazine As publisher and editor of the St. Louis Mirror, Richard Lowenstein has directed his efforts toward production of an uncommon news magazine that strives simply to “say something that isn’t being said,” within the established news media. “We’re here to reflect and solicit our readers’ views in order to create a dialogue of sorts,” image location
Miscellany and Review 1853 The Miscellany and Review made its appearance in January, 1853. T.F. Risk was its editor. Each number contained fifty-six pages; it was not illustrated. It was devoted to "education, the science of government, home commerce," literature, miscellany, etc. Its articles were short and mostly selected - "intended to be of practical mien," abjuring "fancy and flowers." Only a few numbers of image location
The Mississippi Blatter 1857- 1938? T. Danzer and F. Wenzel, publishers. Var: Sunday edition of the Westliche Post, St. Louis Mississippi Blatter. image location
Mississippi Handel's-Zeitung 1857- 1861 In 1857, Robert M. Widmar started the Mississippi Handel's Zeiitung (Journal of Commerce), a German paper, published weekly. It was under the editorial charge of Robert M. Widmar, Dr. Koch, and Joseph Bauer. In 1861 it was changed into an English paper, The Journal of Commerce... [Widmar had] moved to St. Louis...and became connected with the newspaper press of image location
Mississippi Valley Building Association News 1892- 1893 Monthly edited by John G. O'Keefe, devoted to the interests and progress of mutual savings, loan and building societies, and the general education of the shareholder. image location
Mississippi Valley Contractor 1908- 1958 R.O. Schaefer, Inc., publisher. image location
Mississippi Valley Democrat & Journal of Agriculture 1898- 1900 image location
Mississippi Valley Farmer 1843- 1844 Devoted to agriculture, horticulture, and the rural economy. John Libby, editor; Libby & Hale, publishers. image location
Mississippi Valley Grocer 1880 The Mississippi Valley Grocer, a weekly price current, was established in May, 1880, by Brookmire & Rankin; S.H. Jackson, editor. (From the History of St. Louis City and County by John Thomas Scharf, 1883). image location
Mississippi Valley Review and Journal of Commerce 1845- 1870? Var: Journal of Agriculture. Became St. Louis Journal of Agriculture. Economical Printing Company image location
Missouri Advocate 1824- 1826 In the issue of this paper [Missouri Gazette] of December 24, 1824, a prospectus was printed which announced that the Gazette had been transferred to Keemle and Foreman, and would be published as the Missouri Advocate. On February 15, 1825, the Advocate informed its readers that the paper “will in future, be issued in the city of St. Louis. image location
The Missouri Advocate and St. Louis Advertiser 1825- 1826 Foreman and Keemle, publishers. Merged with Enquirer, which was purchased from Duff Green in August, 1825. Renamed Missouri Advocate and St. Louis Enquirer. image location
Missouri Advocate and St. Louis Enquirer 1825 Foreman & Keemle, publishers. Moved from St. Charles to St. Louis in 1825. Keemle left in February of 1826, leaving S.W. Foreman in charge. When he ran into problems in December, Foreman announced he was changing the name of the paper to the St. Louis Enquirer, but he was not successful in rescusitating the name. image location
The Missouri American 1916- 1971 James E. Winterton, editor. Published by the State Council of Missouri, Junior Order United American Mechanics. image location
Missouri and Illinois Baptist 1844 ​Founded by Rev. J.T. Hinton. Var: Missouri Baptist; Illinois Baptist image location
Missouri and Illinois Temperance Herald 1835?- 1840? St. Louis and Alton. Published by the executive committees of the Missouri and Illinois State Temperance Societies. image location
The Missouri Argus 1831- 1841 The first editor of the Argus, was Judge J.B. Bowlin, who long afterward became United States minister to Colombia. In 1839, William Gilpin, afterward Governor of  Colorado, was editor. In 1841 the office passed into the hands of Abel Rathbone Corbin, thence to Shadrach  Penn...who called it the Missouri Reporter. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri edited by Howard L. Conard, image location
Missouri Baptist 1842?- 1844? ​Founded by Rev. J.T. Hinton. Var: Missouri and Illinois Baptist image location
Missouri Blatter 1874 Evening paper [another source says Sunday paper] associated with the Courier. image location
Missouri Cascade 1853- 1855 Formerly Temperance Battery.  Merged with Shepherd of the Valley. Renamed True Shepherd and Cascade. Var: Cascade. Temperance publication. image location
Missouri Citizen 1888- 1889 image location
Missouri Construction News 1922-1923 Monthly published by the Construction News Syndicate. Raymond Walsh, editor. image location
The Missouri Democrat 1852- 1875 The Missouri Democrat Richard Edwards and Dr. M. Hopewell The Missouri Democrat was established in 1852 by William McKee and William Hill under propitious auspices. All the patronage which had been bestowed upon the Sentinel and Union, two popular journals, was turned upon the new enterprise; for both of these papers were discontinued at the commencement of the Democrat, image location
Missouri Demokrat 1843- 1945? Edward Warren, a young lawyer of St. Louis, achieved considerable reputation as the "poet" of the Anzeiger. In 1843 he started the Demokrat, because the Anzeiger was not radical enough in its support of the Van Buren administration. He was an active and capable man, but the Germans regarded him as being more of a politician than a journalist, image location
Missouri Dental Journal 1869- 1883 The Missouri Dental Journal, monthly, was founded in 1869 by members of the profession, in advocacy of their interests, and their editorial management was committed to Dr. Homer Judd, who served for four years, when he was succeeded by Dr. W.H. Eames. The ownership passed to A.M. Leslie & Co., who purchased the New England Dentist, of Springfield, Massachusetts, and merged it image location
Missouri Emigrant 1859 Devoted to the benefit of those wishing to procure a home in the West. image location
Missouri Farmer 1841? P. Gould, editor/publisher image location
Missouri Fiery Cross 1923- 1924? Klan publication. C.C. Crawford, publisher; Frederick R. Barkhurst, editor. image location
Missouri Free Press 1832- ? John Steele, editor. Became Free Press. image location
The Missouri Gazette 1808-1809, 1812-1814, 1815-1818 The region’s first newspaper was founded and edited by Joseph Charless, “Printer to the Territory,” on July 12, 1808. While Charless had originally decided to call it the Missouri Gazette and Louisiana Advertiser as noted in the prospectus shown below, Missouri Gazette was adopted as the first official name of the publication. The name of the paper was changed image location
Missouri Gazette 1823- 1824 St. Charles. Stephen W. Foreman, publisher. Sold to The Missourian and moved to Jefferson City. image location
Missouri Gazette and Illinois Advertiser 1814- 1815 Joseph Charless, publisher. Name changed back to Missouri Gazette. image location
Missouri Gazette and Public Advertiser 1818- 1822 By Joseph Charless. Sold circa 1821 to James C. Cummins. He then sold it to Charless’ son Edward, who changed the paper’s name to the Missouri Republican. image location
The Missouri Herald 1820 Orr and Fleming image location
The Missouri Herald and St. Louis Public Advertiser 1826- 1827? Published by Charles Keemle. image location
The Missouri Immigrant 1880 The Missouri Immigrant was established Jan. 1, 1880, under the auspices of the State Board of Immigration. In 1881, Samuel Archer became proprietor and editor. The paper, an eight-page monthly, is devoted to immigration, agriculture, stock-raising, wool-growing, and mining, and has done much to advertise Missouri abroad. It is judiciously edited, and its articles, both original and contributed, are image location
Missouri Journal 1865 Successor to Missouri Radical. image location
The Missouri Klan Kourier 1924- 1928 Empire Publishing Company image location
Missouri Labor 1878- 1879 Weekly published by the Labor Newspaper Union image location
Missouri Land Register and Advertiser 1866 Jefferson City and St. Louis. W.S. Pollard, St. Louis publisher. “The…sole object of this paper is to assist in filling Missouri with enterprising, industrious settlers.” image location
Missouri Medical and Surgical Journal 1845- 1848 Monthly. Thomas Barbour and A.J. Coons, editors. Published by McDowell College of Medicine. Merged with the St. Louis Medical and Surgical Journal. image location
Missouri Medicine 1953-1976 Publication of the Missouri State Medical Association. image location
Missouri Methodist 1971?- 1973? Bi-monthly image location
Missouri Mule 1911- 1913 Humor publication. T. Elmore Lucey, editor/publisher. image location
Missouri Observer 1826- 1828 Weekly. William Orr, editor. Var: Missouri Observer and St. Louis Advertiser.     image location
Missouri Observer and St. Louis Advertiser 1827- 1828 Former Commercial Advertiser. William Orr, publisher. Var:  Missouri Observer. image location
The Missouri Patriot 1846- 1847 Former Advertiser.  Became Western Star.  N.C. Orear and E.D. Bevitt, publishers.  “Union, Concession, Harmony. Everything for the cause, nothing for men.” image location
Missouri Post 1881- 1881 The Post of Quincy, Illinois, was relocated to St. Louis in the spring of  1881 and its name changed to The Missouri Post. It was published by H.A. Post and edited by H. Martin Williams, at that time a prominent Greenbacker...In 1882 it was removed to Kansas City. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
Missouri Presbyterian 1865- 1870? The Missouri Presbyterian was established in 1865 by Aaron F. Cox, formerly of the St. Louis Observer. Mr. Cox died Nov. 5, 1869. Mr. Cox was born in Philadelphia, and his publishing career began in Louisville, Ky., in 1855, on the Watchman and Evangelist, which was united with the Missouri Cumberland Presbyterian in 1858. The consolidated paper was published image location
Missouri Radikale 1864 Established to push presidential candidacy of John C. Fremont. image location
The Missouri Reporter 1841- 1846 An outgrowth of The Missouri Argus. When owner Shadrach Penn, Jr., died, the controlling interest in the paper was sold to Loring Pickering and Samuel Treat, who had founded The Missourian. They combined the two papers and called their publication renamed it The St. Louis Union.  image location
The Missouri Republican 1822- 1888 The Missouri Republican Joseph Dacus and James William Buel             In 1821 [another source states March 1822] the name of the Missouri Gazette was changed to Missouri Republican by its then proprietor, James C. Cummins, who had purchased it in 1820 from its founder, Joseph Charless. In 1822 Mr. Cummins transferred the paper to Edward Charless, a son of image location
Missouri Ruralist 1902- 1927? H.R. Nelson, editor; Arthur Capper, publisher. image location
Missouri Saturday News 1838- 1839 Charles Keemle and Company, publisher. Col. Charles Keemle and Maj. Alphonso Wetmore, editors. The first issue of this literary weekly appeared January 1, 1838. Keemle soon left the paper. Var.: Saturday News image location
Missouri School Journal 1883- ? Albert S. Lehr, editor; Missouri School Journal Publishing Company. image location
Missouri Schulbote 1866 Carl Beyschlag, editor/publisher. image location
Missouri Socialist 1901?- 1902? Socialist Democratic Party paper. E. Val Putnam, editor. image location
Missouri Staats-Zeitung 1872- 1873 (“Missouri State Newspaper”) established by Louis Didier. Dr. E.H. Maak, editor; Missouri Staats-Zeitung Company, publisher. image location
Missouri Standard 1843 Lynde Elliot, publisher. Ceased publication after a couple issues. image location
Missouri State Journal 1868 Weekly. Missouri State Journal Company. image location
Missouri State Republican 1901- 1909 E.C. Brokmeyer, president and editor. State Republican Publishing Company. image location
Missouri State Review 1871 image location
Missouri State Sentinel 1868- ? “The Constitution and the equality of the state: These are the symbols of everlasting union.” image location
Missouri State Topics 1925- 1926 E.A. Vaughn, publisher. image location
Missouri Submissionist 1886 Benjamin Walter, managing editor. Temperance paper. image location
Missouri Teamster 1963 Official publication of Teamsters Joint Council 13. Jake McCarthy, editor. Became Midwest Labor World. image location
Missouri Transcript 1892- 1898? image location
Missouri United Methodist 1973?- 1975? image location
Missouri United Methodist Reporter 1975?- 1983? image location
Missouri Veteran 1923 Published by the Missouri Veterans Association. "A non-political non-sectarian paper dedicated to the sacred memory of our fallen comrades, devoted to the cause of justice and right in general and to the interests and welfare of the ex-service men of the United States in particular." image location
Missouri Voice 1892- 1894 1894   Pro-Prohibition paper. Chas. E. Stokes, editor/ publisher. Var: People’s Voice. image location
Missouri Woman 1915- 1919 Emily Newell Blair, editor; Missouri Woman Publishing Company. image location
Missouri Zeitung 1854- ? (“Missouri Newspaper”) Louis Didier, editor. image location
The Missourian 1820- 1822 St. Charles. Robert McCloud, publisher. Var.: St. Charles Missourian. image location
Missourian 1843- 1846 Founded by V.P. Van Antwerp. Renamed the Daily Missourian. image location
Modern Mexico 1890- 1909 William C. Smith, manager; Paul Hudson, editor. Monthly business/commerce, published in both St. Louis and Mexico City. image location
Modern Miller 1874- 1937 Augustine Gallagher, editor; Modern Miller Company. image location
Modern View 1898- 1943 Devoted to progress and Jewish ideals.. Abe Rosenthal, editor; Modern View Printing and Publishing Company. image location
The Monetary Record 1904- 1910 The Monetary Record Company. Editor: J.C. Fisher image location
Moniteur de l’Ouest 1856- Le Moniteur de l'Ouest was begun sometime in April, 1856, by E. Delane Maryat, who came to St. Louis shortly before starting the paper. He was connected with the French press of New Orleans in the early fifties. The Moniteur was a weekly and had a brief career. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1902). image location
The Monitor 1975- 1983 Former East St. Louis Monitor. Clyde C. Jordan, publisher. image location
Monitor 1887- 1895 Newspaper of The People’s Party. J.B. Follett, editor/ publisher. image location
The Monitor 1915- 1947? Kirkwood. John Jacaty? Founder. Bought equipment from The Tablet. image location
The Monthly Blossom 1874- 1877 George F. Pierrot editor/publisher. image location
The Morning Call 1884- ? Daily. Var: The Call. image location
The Morning Globe 1873- 1876 Established by D. M. Houser, George Fishback and J.B. McCullagh. Merged with the St. Louis Democrat May 18, 1876. image location
Morning News 1876 An Alton daily begun 6/18/1876 by James McInerney and Eugene Bronson. Final issue published 9/1/1876. image location
Morning Signal 1852- 1953 Daily. First issue published January 1, 1852. The Signal was the enterprise of a group of printers, - some of whom became prominent in after years. These printers included Charles G. Gonter, Joseph L. Craft, Robert McKee, John F. Frazier, M.C. Libby. A partner in this newspaper venture was J. Wilson McDonald who went to New York and became image location
Motor Digest 1915 Bulletin of the Auto Club of St. Louis. image location
Mound City Review 1881- ? Weekly. Mound City Review Publishing Company. image location
Mprojtja Shqipetare 1916- Albanian "Albanian Defense." Weekly. image location
Much Ado 1915- 1933 Harry Turner, editor; Ado Publishing Company image location
Music in the Home Monthly. Lehman Piano Company image location
Musical News 1897- 1898 A musical journal, published monthly by Spang & Luhn. image location
Myerson's American Family Magazine 1905- 1906 Also: American Family Magazine. Samuel F. Myerson. image location
Naborhood Link News 1930- 1996 Published every Friday by Edward F. Schertel. Naborhood Link News Out of Business By Don Corrigan After more than 65 years of weekly publication, the Naborhood Lionk News ceased publication on Jan. 24, 1996. The community newspaper served Lemay, Carondelet, Oakville, Mehlville, Jefferson Barracks, parts of Affton and Concord Village. In recent years, the newspaper has faced competition for image location
The National 1878 The paper was established in East St. Louis Aug. 9, 1878, by Archibald A. Hamilton. Its object in the journalistic world was, as stated by the editor, "to improve the social, moral and pecuniary conditions of the working class." It was an advocate of financial reform and Fiat theories. Mr. Hamilton was induced to start the paper with promises image location
The National 1892- 1900 Pro-Prohibition paper. Also called National Weekly. image location
National American 1878- 1897, 1881- 1884 The first number of The National American bote the date of September 29, 1878. Augustus C. Appler was its publisher. It was an eight-page, five column "Knownothing" weekly. Later on in the course of its publication it became an organ of the temperance societies. It suspended in 1879 and was revived in 1881. Altogether, it lived some six or seven image location
National Druggist 1885- 1936 H.M. Whelpley, editor; Henry R. Strong, publisher. “Published monthly in the interest of the general drug trade.” image location
National Dry Goods Reporter image location
National Drygoodsman ​Var.: Dry Goodsman and General Merchant image location
National Farm Journal 1902-1935 Published by Farmers' Monthly Company image location
National Farmer and Stock Grower 1886- 1921 Monthly. ​Hale Publishing Company. Philip H. Hale, managing editor. image location
National Home Journal 1906-1909 National Home Journal Company, Fanny Bonner Price, editor. image location
National Irish-American 1902- 1909? W.R. Vaughan, editor and publisher. “A newspaper ‘of the people and for the people’ whose policy is courtesy to all, slavery to none.” image location
National Issue 1909- 1910? image location
National Live Stock Reporter 1905- 1907 image location
National Prohibitionist 1865- 1870 Weekly. Prohibitionist Company, publisher.  image location
National Rip-Saw 1904- 1917 Founded by Frank and Kate Richards O’Hare. Col. Dick Maple, editor; Philip Wagner, president. A monthly journal devoted to the interest of that part of humanity which has the heavy end of the log. Became American Vanguard. image location
National Stock Yard Reporter 1873- 1880 The paper was first issued in Nov. 1873, by Messrs. John Haps & Co. Three numbers were printed when it suspended and recommenced in March, 1874. It rapidly increased in importance and attained a circulation of over five thousand copies. It was at the height of its prosperity when an absurd ruling was made by the Post Office Department, image location
The National Tribune 1876- 1883? The National Tribune was an eight-page, five-column weekly, published by J.W. Wilson in the interests of colored people. The first number was issued on May 3, 1876. It lived some seven or eight years, counting interruptions in its publication. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). Another source says the paper was Republican. The National Tribune, image location
Native American Bulletin 1842 The first issue of the paper on January 3, 1842, carried the following positioning statement: "The Perpetuation of American Freedom is Our Object. American Rights Our Motto. And the American Party Our Cognomen. This is the first day of our editorial life. We this day enter a new field of labor, with the certainty that we shall encounter most image location
Natural Bridge News 1931?- ? H.E. Huneke, publisher. image location
Near By 1957- 1960 Monthly neighborhood news. image location
The Negro 1940- 1945 Monthly. Frederick W. Bond, editor image location
The Negro Child 1915-1927 Published by the Sodality of St. Peter Claver for the African Missions image location
Negro Weekly Sensation 1897- ? Hezekiah Sirloin, editor image location
Negro World 1875?- 189? Black weekly. J.W. Wilson, editor/publisher. image location
Neighborhood News 1922- 1947? “Published by South St. Louisans For South St. Louis!”  B.H. Nordmann, editor/publisher. image location
Neighborhood Progress 1962- 1964 image location
Network News 1992?- 1995 Fenton.  Mary Beckmann, editor. Published for Fenton and surrounding areas. image location
Neue Welt 1868- 1871 In November, 1868, Der Volks-Zeitung was merged with Die Neue Welt (New World), a morning paper, started by a stock company composed mainly of stockholders of the German Bank. The first editors of Die Neue Welt were Heinrich Binder and Carl Roesser. A. Willhartilz...was business manager for a season; among others who acted in that capacity was Louis Soldan...Finally, image location
Neue Zeit 1862- 1864? Georg Hillgartner. Merged with Westliche Post. image location
Neuer Anzeiger des Westens 1864- 1869 Continued Anzeiger des Westens. image location
Neurotica 1948- 1952 Jay Irving Landesman, editor; Neurotica Publishing Company. image location
New Citizen 1961 Bi-weekly. Ernest Calloway, publisher. image location
New Era 1840- 1850? Charles G. Ramsey. Var: St. Louis New Era, St. Louis Daily New Era. image location
New Hard Times 1967-1968 Monthly underground paper. image location
New Inventions and Patents 1931-? ​Monthly image location
New Outlook 1970 Christine Reams, editor; Elsa Debra Hill, publisher. The newspaper for thinking people. African-American. image location
The New Southwest 1903- 1906? J.C. Small, editor; New Southwest Publishing Company. image location
New St. Louis Magazine 1873- 1896 A popular monthly of stories, narratives and amusing literature, current gossip, hints on hygiene, notes for the home, editorial miscellany, etc., etc. Advance Book Co., publishers. image location
New St. Louis Star 1913- 1914 Occasional name of Star-Times image location
New Thought Truth 1915-1917 Monthly published by the New Thought League and edited by Miss Harriet C. Hulick, League Manager. A Messenger of the Great World Movement for Highest Human Good; an Exponent of the Nobler Individualism. image location
The News 1863- 1867 It was published by a company of which Edwin Harrison was president and George Mills the editor. At first it gave promise of a successful career, but soon was "sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought." Mr. Harrison withdrew, resources became exhausted and the News collapsed, and was absorbed into the Dispatch. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri edited by image location
The News 1889- 1890? Kirkwood image location
The News 1911- 1913 Florissant image location
The News 1914 ​Florissant image location
The News 1945 Published during a strike at the Post-Dispatch. image location
The News & Record Review 1965- ? ​East Alton image location
News and Daily Hotel Reporter 1906- 1907? St. Louis News Publishing and Printing Company. Var.: St. Louis Daily News and Daily Hotel Reporter. image location
News and Hotel Register 1905 St. Louis News Pub. and Printing Company. Var.: St. Louis Daily News and Hotel Register. News and Hotel Register, Daily Hotel Register. image location
The News Letter 1860- 1861 Volume 1, Number 1 was published January 19, 1860. August Hamilton was publisher, and Alexander G. Hawes was editor. It was a seven-column folio, independent of politics, with slight tendencies toward the Republican party. On January 25th, 1861, it was consolidated with the Advocate in Belleville. (From The History of St. Clair County by Brink, McDonough & Company, 1881) image location
News of St. Louis Hills 1935- 1952 image location
News Telegraph ​Var.: Gay News Telegraph image location
The News-Champion 1914- 1935 ​      image location
News-Review 1926 East St. Louis image location
Newstead-Marcus News 1930- 1931 Semi-monthly. H.E. Huneke, publisher. image location
Night Times 1992- 1998 Monthly entertainment and music paper. Julia Gordon, editor/publisher. image location
The Night Whirl 1938 Founded By Ben Thomas. Name changed in 1939 to The Evening Whirl.  image location
The Nines 2013 Growing up boys explore their world, learn some things, play a lot, and get dirty often. They become teenagers and go through some awkward changes while trying to figure out what to do with the rest of their lives. And then, at some point they cross over into adulthood. They become men. Many men stop exploring one of the image location
The Nineteenth Hole 1929- Monthly publication of the Golfers News Service Assn., Inc. distributed to members of local country clubs. image location
The Nite Club Gossip 1928- 1938? ​Al Bayou, editor. image location
No Bad News 1980- 1985 ​Mixed Reaction Greets Publisher of Gay Paper             Publisher Suzanne Goell put out the first issue of the gay newspaper No Bad News in June 1980. The monthly has a circulation of 8,000 and sports a host of midtown advertisers.             Immediately accepted by the gay community, Goell received a chilly reception from friends and associates. “About a third were image location
NoisyPaper 1982- 1983; 1999- NoisyPaper Debuts AgainBy Dawn Grodsky             A new alternative monthly is hoping to be heard loud and clear. NoisyPaper was launched this fall [1999] by two ex-Riverfront Times staffers and one who continues to work there part time. Publisher Carrie Lindsey, Managing Editor Kevin Renick and Contributing Editor Thomas Crone say they’re not trying to compete with the RFT but image location
The Non-Sectarian 1891- 1895 The Non-Sectarian was published monthly from January, 1891, to December, 1895, when it was sold to the publisher of To-Day, a Philadelphia magazine, now suspended. It was almost entirely religious in its selection and treatment of subjects, scarcely any space being allotted to literature proper. Its size was gradually increased from twenty-eight to fifty pages per number. (From the Encyclopedia of the History image location
Normandy Area Advocate 1979?- 1980? ​Normandy Municipal Council, publisher. image location
Normandy Community Advocate 1996 Weekly image location
The North County Headlight 1880? image location
The North County Messenger 1877 image location
North End Leader 1895- 1896 Var.: North St. Louis Leader. image location
North St. Louis Community News 1922?- 1968 Esther Carey, editor; H.E. Huneke Publishing Company. image location
North St. Louis Head-Light 1880 George Negus, publisher. image location
North St. Louis Leader 1893- 1895 Renamed North End Leader. image location
North St. Louis News - 1897 Was merged with two other papers into the St. Louis News. image location
North, South and West Journal 1893- 1899 image location
Northsider 2010- Weekly political newspaper. Its mission is to present the news, stories and opinions of the people of north St. Louis and to highlight the many great things happening in our community. Antonio French, publisher. image location
Northwest County Journal 1914- 1983 Published in Wellston image location
Noticias 1995- ? image location
Nouvelle Revue Icarienne 1857- 1859 Semi-monthly published in French, with English and German by A.M. Mercadier. image location
Nucleus 1923 Fine arts monthly. image location
Nuggets 1921-1926 Monthly published by M. H. Alexander image location
Oakville Call 1994?- ? Deborah Baker, publisher. image location
The Observer 1833- 1836 Some readers of his Times articles suggested that [Elijah] Lovejoy start a Presbyterian weekly. They offered to finance it. So the first issue of the St. Louis Observer appeared on November 22, 1833. Its sponsors were pleased until its editor took an extreme position on emancipation. They expostulated with the editor. Slavery was an evil, they agreed, but Missourians image location
The Observer 1876- 1900? The Observer is the organ of the Cumberland Presbyterians and circulates very largey among the people of that denomination in the North and West. It is a six-column quarto, published weekly, and is conducted with marked ability. (From the History of St. Louis City and County by John Thomas Scharf, 1883). “Holding Forth the Word of Life.”  D.M. Harris, C.M. image location
The Observer 1954- 1957 Weekly. A.E. Rosenblatt, publisher. Var.: Maplewood Observer image location
Observer and Suburban Review 1951- 1954 Weekly. Name reverted to The Observer. image location
Old School Democrat and Saint Louis Herald 1813- 1844 Variation: Old School Democrat and St. Louis Weekly Herald. Joseph Ellis, proprietor; Vespasian Ellis, editor. “Our country first; Our country next; Our country always.” On February 20, 1844 the paper’s name was changed to the St. Louis Democrat. image location
Old School Presbyterian 1870?- 1874? Rev. Robert Farris, editor; Charles B. Cox, publisher. Var.: St. Louis Presbyterian, Missouri Presbyterian. image location
Omnibus 1851? Otto Wustrich, editor/publisher image location
On the Line 1970- 1971 Published by the St. Louis Media Project "On the Line is put out by women and men who work in stores, factories, offices and communities around St. Louis. We have all had different kinds of community experience like helping set up the Women's Center, supporting the Coalition Against Lead Poisoning and working to end the war. "We are working image location
Once A Month 1895- 1896 An illustrated magazine of industry and progress containing write-ups of cities and business, along with statistics and a modicum of popular literature. John Lethem, publisher. image location
The Optimist 1902- Frank G. Tyrrell, editor/W.W. Warton, managing editor. Monthly illustrated magazine embodying the spirit of achievement in Western literature, art and industry. image location
Orff’s Farm and Poultry Review 1900- 1909 Farmer Orff Publishing Company. image location
Organ and Reveille 1839- 1852 Russell S. Higgins, who came to St. Louis as a printer about 1838, was a partner of Abel Rathbone Corbin in the publication of the Missouri Argus. About the year 1840 Mr. Higgins started the first penny newspaper west of the Mississippi, calling it the People’s Organ. He conducted the penny paper for five or six years and sold it image location
Organisator 1890 Union campaign paper. image location
Ostfriesische Nachrichten 1905- ? image location
Our American Youth 1884- 1886 Monthly. C. J. Fuelscher & Co. publisher. Later M.D. Batchelder & Co. Emphasis on stamp collecting. image location
Our Faith 1875- 1877 Our Faith, a religious paper, was started in Alton in September, 1875. T.H. Perrin and Dr. J.B. Logan were the proprietors. It was published monthly and was designed as the mouthpiece of the Cumperland Presbyterian Church. It was continued one year and seven months, when it was sold to the St. Louis Observer Co., of which Messrs. Perrin and image location
Our Own Country 1894 Weekly national art magazine. James Cox, editor. image location
Our Times 1878- 1881 Begun on the 2nd of October, 1878, A.W. & J.S. Angier served as editors and publishers. Our Times was continued until the latter part of March, 1881, when it was sold to Messrs. Price & Simcox. On the 28th of May, 1881, the name of the paper was changed to the Edwardsville Times. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois by image location
Out & Out Right News 1994- Monthly serving Jefferson County and Fenton. Ann Uhrig, editor. image location
Out in STL 2017- Euclid Media Group. Chris Keating, publisher; Nicholas Phillips, editor. Quarterly. "If national trends apply locally, four percent of St. Louis identifies as LGBTQ. On paper, that's just a number and string of letters; in real life, it's a rich mix of humans more than 100,000 strong  - and countless interesting stories. It's those stories that compelled us to launch image location
Outdoor Guide Magazine Bi-Monthly image location
Outlaw 1970?- 1973? “Independent radical newspaper.”  Briefly affiliated with KDNA in 1970. "The St. Louis Outlaw is an independent, raical newspaper published every three weeks by the Outlaw collective - David, Dev, Fred, Lori and Terry...We are members of Liberation News Service (LNS)  and UPS. We subscribe to Pacific News Service (PNS) and the news service of the North American Congress on image location
OutLook Magazine St. Louis 2002 Founded by Dustin Mitchell "to provide the St. Louis area GLBT community with a high-quality, diverse, informative magazine that presents a broad spectrum of topics in a style that the community deserves." image location
Overland Record News 1921- 1942? ​      image location
Painting and Wallcovering Contractor 1985- 2007 Thomas J. Finan, IV, editor/publisher. image location
Paladin 1918 Weekly image location
Palette and Bench 1908?- 1910 E.G. Lewis Publications image location
Palladium 1884- 1911? John W. Wheeler, editor/publisher. Official organ of the U.B.F and S.M.T. Also the A.U.K. and D. of A. in the West. Negro paper. Wheeler’s writing was flashy and his high-profile activities in the community were often spotlighted in his articles. Wheeler was quick to take on the editors of the other Negro papers in St. Louis, and when a image location
The Paper 1970- 1979 Non-profit monthly serving residents of the area bounded by Lindell to Delmar & DeBaliviere to the city limits. Jody Creighton, Jean Eberle and Mary Parker, editors. image location
Pastoral Blatt 1866- 1925 Monthly publication for archdiocesan priests served as the archives of the Catholic church in North America, publishing decrees of the Cardinals, documents of the church and any religious items of interest. The Rev. Father Muehlsiepen was its first editor. After two years he was succeeded by the Rev. W. Faerber. image location
Patience Worth's Magazine 1917 "The sole purpose of this publication is to spread and to interpret the words of Patience Worth. It is not a medium of occultism nor of psychical research. It will not concern itself with kindred phenomena of any character. It is not related to nor associated with any cult or society, nor has it any theories to present other image location
Patriot 1923- 1928 “A Free-Lance In the Field of Patriotic Protestant Journalism” (anti-Catholic). In 1923, E.M. Crane is listed as the publisher, and much was being printed about Klan doings. It later evolved into a Klan publication with W.B. Carleton, publisher; F.R. Barkhurst and C.C. Crawford, editors. Var.: Missouri Klan Kourier.  “One Country, One Flag, One Language.”  image location
Patriote et le Phare des Lacs 1878- 1887? French weekly. L. Sequenot & E. Boudinet, publishers. image location
Pedal 1895- ? Bicycling publication. W.L. Sachtleben,editor; Union Printing Company. image location
Pennant 1839- 1840 Shown in 1840 as the Daily Pennant (M.V. Hall and J.G. Shaw). Shown in 1841 as Daily Pennant and Native American. image location
People 1872- ? Published in Belleville image location
People 1887 Advocated Prohibition. L.B. Miller, editor/publisher. image location
The People Magazine 1962 Monthly. S.E. Seymour, editor/publisher. image location
People's Advocate 1882- 1884 The People's Advocate was begun in March, 1882, and lived about two years. J.F. Crews and E.F. Henderson were its publishers, and H. Martin Williams its editor. It was a weekly Greenback paper. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
People's Guide 1967- 1973 Weekly. J. Vaughn Chapmen, editor-in-chief image location
People's Press 1860 Richard Edwards, publisher. Also: People's Weekly Press. image location
People’s Advocate 1879- ? Greenback Party paper. Became St. Louis County Advocate. image location
The People’s Advocate 1896- 1899 Merged with St. Louis County Watchman This paper was the second of R.B. Crossman’s ventures in journalism in St. Louis county. At the time when he suspended publication of the Star-Republican in 1882, he had promised to “come again.” In 1896, fourteen years later, he commenced the publication of an avowedly Independent Republican paper at Clayton, in a new building image location
The People’s Gazette 1871- 1873 The initial number of the People’s Gazette was issued July 18, 1871. It was published under the auspices of the “People’s Gazette Association.”…The editorial duties were performed by the different stockholders until 1872, when Mr. Saltiel became publisher. The name was changed to the East St. Louis Daily Press. (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois by Brink, McDonough image location
People’s Organ 1840- 1846 The People's Organ  Russell S. Higgins, who came to St. Louis as a printer about 1838, was a partner of Abel Rathbone Corbin in the publication of the Missouri Argus. About the year 1840 Mr. Higgins started the first penny newspaper west of the Mississippi, calling it the People’s Organ. He conducted the penny paper for five or six years image location
The People’s Paper 1914- ? “An independent paper devoted honestly and whole-heartedly to the interests of the common people of St. Louis. It stands for the upbuilding of the People’s League and its plan of organization as a necessary means to the effective expression of the people’s will.” Sheridan Webster, editor/publisher.  image location
People’s Voice 1892- 1918? Socialist Society.  Advocated Prohibition. Var: Missouri Voice. image location
Perspective 1950- 1975 Quarterly of modern literature and the arts, begun in Louisville in 1947, but moved to St. Louis in 1950. The three editors were English instructors at Washington University: Jarvis Thurston, his wife Mona Van Duyn and Ralph Nash. image location
Philately 1946-1947 Weekly news magazine of stamp collecting published by Comfort Press. image location
The Piasa 1892 Alton weekly founded 2/1/1892 by J.T. Callahan. image location
Picket Guard 1888- 1902? Military. H.D. O’Brien, editor/publisher. Also published in East St. Louis image location
Pilot 1854- 1856 Var: Weekly St. Louis Evening Pilot, Weekly St. Louis Pilot. image location
Pioneer 1829- 1836 The first religious journal in St. Clair County appears to have been the Pioneer. The Prospectus was issued in December of 1828, and the first paper issued April 25th, 1829, at Rock Springs, the seat of Rock Springs Seminary. It was established by Rev. Thos. P. Green, a Baptist minister who brought a hand press and type from Cape image location
Pioneer 1858- William Cuddy, publisher. "Devoted to the interests of the American Party." image location
Pithy Sayings 1901? James Ballard, publisher. image location
Planter and Stockman 1885- ? Journal for the farmer, stockman, poulterer, horticulturist, gardener, dairy, apiarist, housewife, &c. Absorbed by the Journal of Agriculture. image location
The Platonist 1881- 1888 This is the title of a monthly published in St. Louis in 1881, the editor being Thomas M. Johnson, a lawyer of Osceola, Mo., a gentleman well known to students of speculative philosophy. The Platonist was devoted to the dissemination of the Platonic Philosophy. (From the History of St. Louis City and County by John Thomas Scharf, 1883). image location
Plima 1997- ? Bosnian magazine. Publisher: Dijana Groth. image location
Political Review 1901- 1905 Republican weekly. Metropolitan Publishing Company. image location
The Politician 1844- ? Belleville. “Published every now and then by F.A. Snyder & Company.” image location
The Politician 1930- 1931 Published in the interest of social, civic and good government. The Meier Company, publisher; Charles F. Meier, editor.  "The Politician will define right from wrong and will not be timid in denouncing hypocrisy."  image location
The Poultry Record 1886- ? Monthly devoted to poultry, pigeons and pet stock for the amateur and professional breeder. C.C. Cushing, editor/publisher. W.S. Riches, publisher. image location
Practical Photographer 1877- ? ​ Edited by photographer J.H. Fitzgibbon. image location
Practical Printer 1899- 1911 Monthly published by Inland Type Foundary With the December issue The Practical Printer completed its fifth year. During the period of its publication many printers' trade papers have been born and have died, but The Practical Printer has steadily advanced in influence and in favor. Its present circulation is 9,250 copies monthly, which is larger, with one exception, than image location
Presbyterian Casket 1851 Sacred and political literature. Rev. S.A. Hodgman, editor/publisher. image location
Presbyterianews 1985?- 1999? Presbytery of Giddings-Lovejoy image location
Presbytery Reporter 1845- ? The Presbytery Reporter was a religious magazine the first number of which appeared May 1st, 1845. The first year only two numbers were issued. From May 1847 to May 1850 it was published quarterly, sixteen pages. From May 1850 to May 1854 it was published bi-monthly. The subscription list was then transferred to the Evangelist, printed at Chicago. In image location
Press News 1879- 1881 R.P. Yorkston, publisher. image location
Price Current and Merchants’ Commercial Record 1850- 1874 image location
Price Current and Trade Journal 1874- 1877? image location
Prime Time 1974- Monthly gay magazine published by Mid-Continent Life Services Corporation. image location
Printing Trades Magazine 1909- 1915 Issued monthly by the Printing Trades Council of St. Louis image location
Private Club Market Finian Publications image location
The Proctologist 1907- 1915 Quarterly. Dr. Roland Barnes, editor. image location
Profile St. Louis 1977- 1978 Hartmann Publishing image location
Progressive Bildor 1964- 1966 Monthly magazine for builders and contractors. Home Builders' Association. image location
Progressive Exponent 1913- 1914 Progressive Party paper. Eugene A. Vogt, editor/publisher. image location
Progressive Press 1930- 1932 “America’s Dominant Journal of Progress”  Replaced St. Louis Labor.  (Interesting  note of optimism: The first issue contained a box on the masthead, calling the paper “The fastest growing weekly in the United States.”)  Progressive Publishing Company. O.E. Jennings, publisher; Irvin John Scully, general manager. image location
Progressive Woman 1994- 2003? Progressive Woman            The Progressive Woman, a new publication for women, made its debut in November [1994]. The 28-page publication is well laid-out and on first glance one would expect it to address issues of substance which are of concern to women.             A closer look and a conversation with Therese Dinkelkamp, office manager (listed right after the publisher and owner image location
Progressive World 1875 A magazine dealing with news of railroads and the localities along the railroad lines, as well as immigration, science and Western interests. R.O. Thompson, editor; Progressive World Company, publisher image location
Prom Magazine 1947- 1973 Julian H. Miller II, formerly account executive of Olian Advertising Company, has resigned to become head of a new firm, Miller Publications, Inc. The company will, among other things, publish a monthly 52-page magazine, "Prom," exclusively for the high school teenagers of Greater St. Louis and vicinity. The magazine, which has the approval of school officials, the Associated Retailers image location
Protestant Monitor 1848 John McPike started publication in Alton in March, 1848. It was devoted to Christianity, free discussion, literature, agriculture, general intelligence, the glory of God and the rights of man. On the 23rd of June, 1848, the name was changed to the Alton Monitor. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois by W.R. Brink & Co. 1882). image location
Protestantisches Familien-Blatt 1873- Monthly published by a club of independent communities of the West to educate and teach the Spirit of the present. image location
Proud Inspiration 1990- 1992 A magazine for the African-American Christian community. Joseph Palmer, publisher. Karla Frye, editor. image location
Proud Magazine 1970- 1981 Monthly for young African-Americans.​      image location
Przewodnik Polski 1899- 1929 ​The Polish Publishing Company  “The Only Polish Weekly West of the Mississippi River.” In 1905, taken over by Helen Moczydlowski.Possibly appeared again in 1945. image location
Public Defender 2002- ? Young Journalists Launch Leftist Alternative WeeklyBy C.D. Stelzer             Antonio French, the 24-year-old editor of Public Defender, sees the role of his new weekly alternative newspaper more like a campaign rather than a business. The idea of founding a newspaper out of idealism nowadays may sound naïve, but French possesses a wealth of business acumen and political expertise for his image location
Public Ownership Leader 1898- 1901? Railroad news. image location
Public School News 1933 Lucia Beck, editor/publisher image location
Puck 1871- 1875? On March 16, 1871, Puck (printed in German) was launched; on the same date in 1872, the English Puck made its bow to the St. Louis public. Louis Willich was its first editor, and the editorials were evidently first written in German and then translated for the English edition. Keppler's cartoons were printed from stone by the McLean Lithograph Company. It was not image location
The Pulse Brentwood   Gene-Del Publishing image location
Push 1916- 1930 Published by and for the junior citizens of St. Louis. A strong determination to go forward. Charles Leonard Clauss, editor. image location
The Quarterback 1946- Published weekly during football season by The Sporting News. image location
Que Pasa? 1998- ? Spanish image location
Queen's Work 1914- 1964 National monthly magazine of Catholic activities. Official organ of the Sodality in America.. Rev. Edw. F. Garesche, Ediitor/Publisher   image location
Radikale 1864? image location
Radio and Entertainment 1930- 1933 Charles T. Burgess - Metropolitan Publishing Company. Local radio broadcast schedules and articles. image location
The Radio Entertainer 1932- ​Metropolitan Publishing Company image location
Railroad Telegrapher 1913- 1927? Published monthly by the Order of Railroad Telegraphers. image location
Rainbow 1875 Possibly only one issue. Allen Pierce, publisher. image location
The Rap 1970- Alternative monthly image location
Raritatenkasten 1850? Leopold Fr. Mader, editor/publisher. image location
The Raven 1900 A literary magazine of the day. Dr. Ralcy Husted Bell, editor; Raven Publishing Company.  Publisher's Announcement Of the making of magazines there is no end. Well, who cares? The field is broad enough for infinite variety. The potatoes are not all dug - or if they are they certainly have not all been roasted. Besides, there are some scattered image location
Real Estate Bulletin 1879- 1918 Became Real Estate Bulletin and Building News. image location
Real Estate Bulletin and Building News 1918- 1919 P.H. Pierce, editor/publisher. Var: St. Louis Real Estate Bulletin and Building News image location
Real Estate Register 1849- 1869 Monthly. Hiram Leffingwell and Richard S. Elliott, publishers. image location
Real Estate Times 1987- ? Real Estate Times New St. Louis Paper            The Real Estate Times, a new, innovative bi-weekly publication devoted to the real estate industry, will be available at more than 250 St. Louis area locations beginning February 28 [1987].            The newspaper will provide a targeted market for real estate advertisers and will give its readers a visual at-home tour image location
Realty and Investment 1973- 1975 C. Marvin Harwood, Sr., publisher. Monthly image location
Realty Record and Builder 1906- 1911 A journal for architects, engineers, contractors and real estate investors. Master Builders Association of St. Louis. F.W. Choisel, editor/publisher. Formerly Builder. image location
The Record 1889- 1890 Legal/financial publication. Daily Record Company, editor/publisher. image location
Record-News 1921- 1942? Powers Publishing, Overland. Howard M. Powers, editor. image location
Red Latina 2000- ? ​      image location
Reedy’s Mirror 1890- 1920 Weekly literary journal reflecting the interest of thinking people. William Marion Reedy, editor/publisher. Reedy and His Mirror By Frank Absher William Marion Reedy, the publisher of Reedy's Mirror, was known all over the nation as an excellent writer, and his work continues to be studied and revered by scholars of the business of writing. As a businessman, he did image location
Referendum 1902? Political organ of the Public Ownership Party. Var.: St. Louis Referendum. image location
The Reform 1878 In 1878 George C. Bunsen of West Belleville purchased a press and printing material from the St. Louis Type Foundry and commenced publication of a paper called The Reform. It was devoted to the interests of the laboring classes, and advocated the claims of the socialists and communists. It was printed for four or five months, when the office image location
Reform 1891- 1899 ​German. Moved to Kansas City. image location
Reformer 1847 Short-time weekly publication of the German Communist Club.  Heinrich Koch, editor/publisher. image location
Regular Baptist Magazine 1875- 1885 The Regular Baptist Magazine was a forty-page monthly, the organ of the "primitive" Baptists. It was published in 1875 by E.H. Burnam. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). "For the defense of the truth of God and the comfort of his people." Fifth Volume of the Magazine (published September, 1880) The Prospectus for this volume image location
Relocating In Saint Louis 1995 Founded by Joe Sweeny. Sold to Network Communications in 1996. Sold to Distinctivce Lifestyles LLC in 2007. image location
Replay 1969- 1974 Replay’s Start By Joe Pollack             Replay began in the spring of 1969, with Steve Apted as president and publisher, and Doris Lieberman as editor. The office was in the Cheshire Inn basement, sharing space with parked cars.             Apted started the magazine because someone convinced him it was both a potential moneymaker and an opportunity to spread the word image location
The Reporter 1945 East St. Louis legal paper. image location
The Representative 1837- 1838 Belleville. Edward S. Cropley, publisher. image location
The Representative and Belleville News 1837- ? ​From the first issue:To Our Readers.             In this, our first Number, it may not be amiss to state, briskly, the course we shall pursue in this Journal. It intended emphatically to be a NEWS Paper, furnishing useful information on all subjects of Agricultural, Commercial, and Political interest, giving occurrences as they happen, and facts as they exist, without any image location
Representative and Gazette 1838- 1839 The St. Clair Mercury, which began business as the St. Clair Gazette, was the forerunner of the Representative and Gazette, the first number of which was issued May, 1838. E.S. Cropley was the editor and publisher. The Representative and Gazette was a large-size folio, and was ably edited and liberally patronized by the merchants and business men of Belleville. image location
The Repudiator 1868 The Repudiator advocated the “repudiation of the whole fraud falsely called a debt, except that part represented by greenbacks, which the people took in good faith.” The first number was issued in February, 1868, and the last number in the following April or May, (a life of a couple months). It was a weekly. Burrell B. Taylor, Samuel Hager and John image location
Resort Management & Operations 1999- 2007 Finian Publications image location
Retailers’ Market News 1932- 1952 Formerly St. Louis Market News. Don Calhoun, editor; Levy Publishing Company. image location
Retriever 1893- 1896 Tax publication image location
Reverb 1981- 1982 Donna Knott, publisher image location
The Review 1900- 1904 A weekly. Arthur Preuss, editor/publisher. image location
Revue de Lanst 1851- 1852 image location
Revue de l’Ouest 1854- 1865 Societe Literaire de St. Louis, publisher. This ably edited journal is well known amid the educated portion of the French inhabitants of the city, and likewise among those American families, of whom there is a great number, that are familiar with the French language. It was established in 1854, and has now a circulation of 2,500. It is a image location
Revue I'Carienne 1857 A.M. Mercadier, publisher. Published in French. Became Nouvelle Revue I'Carienne. image location
The Riddle 1842 Published weekly in Belleville by R. K. Fleming. image location
The River 1891- 1892 Weekly journal for steamboat owners and crews. Abbott Veatch, publisher image location
River Styx 1976- Literary Magazine Celebrates 25 Years By Eileen Duggan             St. Louis-based River Styx Magazine celebrated its 25th anniversary in March [2001].             The award-winning literary magazine was founded in 1976 by a small band of yong poets led by writer Michael Castro, who is still a senior editor.             “The focus of the magazine changes with each editor according to image location
The Riverfront Times 1977- New Times Trumps Old Times at RFT By E.F. Porter             Sure, the Riverfront Times has changed since founder Ray Hartmann sold it 18 months ago [1998]. It has changed for the better. It will continue to change for the better.             And if its old loyal, liberal-left, counter-culture constituency doesn’t like it, well, that’s just tough cheese.             Such image location
Rolling Ball 1850- ? Humor publication. James B. Crangle, proprietor and editor image location
Royal Priest 1889- 1890? image location
SabaH 1997- ? Bosina Community Depends on SabaHBy Rita Csapo-Sweet             In a neatly kept office at 5003 Gravois, just west of the Bevo Mill restaurant, a family has been working hard to publish a national newspaper to help Bosnian immigrants deal with life in their new country and keep them up on events in their war-torn homeland.             It’s nothing new for image location
Saddle and Bridle 1923- 1965 Saddle & Bridle Our Purpose The sport of horse-back riding, the influence of which has been felt most strongly all over the country during the past few years, is manifesting itself in St. Louis in a greater way today than it ever has. More people in St. Louis are riding today than ever did before. Many more are learning image location
The Saint Louis American 1844- 1847 The St. Louis American was started as an American Republican organ in December, 1844. At its inauguration H.H. Holton was its publisher; by 1847 J.D. Learned had replaced Holton. On June 21, 1847 the Republican announced that the American had been revived after a suspension of two months and that in the future it was to be conducted by image location
The Saint Louis Builder 1895- 1902 Official journal of the Master Builders’ Association of St. Louis. F.W. Choisel, editor. St. Louis Builders’ Publishing Company. Became Builder. See also St. Louis Builder. image location
Saint Louis Commercial Record 1878- R. & T.A. Evans, publishers. Monthly. Var.: Commercial Record. image location
Saint Louis County Legal Record and Advertiser 1861- 1866 Morris Niedner, publisher. image location
Saint Louis Evening Post 1869 George Nagus, publisher. Var.: St. Louis Evening Post image location
Saint Louis Home/Garden 1979 Jack Bick, publisher. image location
Saint Louis Journal 1857- 1878 Wolcott & Hume Company, publisher. Took over The Dispatch. Merged with The Times. "The columns of the Journal will contain the fullest and most complete synopsis of local and foreign news, our special telegraphic and local reports being nearly all exclusive and of the most comprehensive character...Persons desiring to have the Daily Journal  left regularly at their houses in the city image location
Saint Louis Journal of Agriculture 1866- 1906 Journal of Agriculture Company, publisher. Became Journal of Agriculture.           image location
Saint Louis Ladies’ Magazine 1871- 1873 The St. Louis Ladies' Magazine was a fifty-six page monthly, illustrated, and on the general plan of the successful Eastern ladies' magazines of that day - Godey's, Peterson's and Arthur's. The first number was issued in May, 1871; Miss Margaret L. Johnson was the editor and proprietor. Its literature proper was of the "light" quality; the fashion plates were furnished by image location
Saint Louis Leader 1855- 1858 The St. Louis Leader was the original "great religious daily" of St. Louis, though it flavored its religion largely with Democratic politics. Its putative head and founder was Charles L. Hunt. Dr. J.V. Huntington, then conducting The Metropolitan, a Catholic magazine in Baltimore, was secured as editor-in-chief, and the paper started March 10, 1855, as a weekly and became a daily on image location
Saint Louis Literary Supplement 1976- 1978 A review of literature, politics and the arts.  John Heidenry, editor. image location
Saint Louis Live Stock and Produce Review 1872- 1877 The oldest live stock paper west of the Mississippi. Cuthbert Powell, publisher. image location
Saint Louis Magazine 1870- 1892 Julia Purinton, publisher. Formerly St. Louis Ladies’ Magazine. Later publisher T. J. Gilmore. Light and amusing literature, timely articles on health and hygiene, home decorations, floriculture, orchard and garden, poultry, etc. image location
The Saint Louis Magazine 1963- 1969 Girard Brownlow, Jr., president; James R. Shaughnessy, editor. Name changed in 1969 to Greater Society St. Louis Magazine.   Mission Statement from the First Issue            The Saint Louis Magazine will be a monthly publication devoted to the whole range of interests of literate and effective families of the metropolitan community who, by virtue of energy, education, taste, income image location
The Saint Louis Medical Reporter 1866- 1869 The Saint Louis Medical Reporter, a journal of general medicine and surgery, issued semi-monthly, first appeared March 1, 1866...At the end of the third volume, it was sold to the publisher...and the Reporter became a monthly. After a few issues it ceased to exist. The Reporter is known as being the second medical journal west of the Mississippi, and the first to make use of image location
Saint Louis Post and Mystic Family 1848 News of various secret orders published by Edmund Flagg and W.F. Chase. image location
The Saint Louis Presbyterian 1850- 1893? Rev. N.L. Rice, D.D., editor; Keith and Woods, publishers.  (1858) James A. Paige, editor. (1876) The Saint Louis Presbyterian and The Memphis Presbyterian, owned and issued by the Presbyterian Publishing Company of St. Louis. Edited by Robert P. Farris, D.D., and Rev. A. Shotwell, St. Louis. A. H. Kerr, D.D., Memphis.  Var: Missouri Presbyterian, Old School Presbyterian. image location
The Saint Louis Reveille 1844- 1850 St. Louis Reveille By Fritz Oehlschlaeger             On June 1, 1844, New York’s Spirit of the Times devoted column one of its first page to welcoming the birth of a “capital new daily journal,” which had “just made its appearance in the beautiful city of St. Louis” under the rather “bizarre and fanciful name” of the Reveille. The author image location
Saint Louis Sentinel 1855- 1864 Publication of sermons. “A Weekly Journal; Devoted to American Interests, Temperance and Literature” J. Gilman, LLD, and L. Mills. image location
Saint Louis Spirit 1876- 1881 “Devoted to the Drama, Music, Art, Literature, Sports, Society and General Topics”  E.B. Skeele and S.H. Burt, proprietors. Secret Society paper merged with Western Live Stock Journal. image location
Saint Louis Town Topics 1929- 1931 Monthly. J. G. Hartwig, editor; American Publisher Corporation. Formerly Society News. image location
Saint Louis Transcript 1844- The only record of the St. Louis Transcript, a penny paper, is a notice in the New Era of February 24, 1844. It stated that the first issue had appeared the day before under the direction of [Ephrian] Abbott and [Thomas] Mann. The paper professed to be independent in politics with its only object that of doing good. How image location
The Saint Louis Union Labor Advocate 1934?- 1937 1937   Founded by Maury Rubin. Changed name to Labor Tribune in 1937.  “A Courageous Constructive Champion of Organized Labor.”  Var.: Union Labor Advocate image location
Saint Louis Weekly 1983- By David P. Garino Co-publishers Carol Jablonow and Vicki Levitt feel – with noticeable verve – that they’ve recently added two cogs that will propel their St. Louis Weekly to bigger and better heights. The “cogs” are new employees: editor Jeff Bredenberg and director of marketing and sales Ian Cohen, who joined the newspaper in February and March, respectively. image location
Saint Louis Weekly Gazette 1843 McKee and Ruth, publishers. Var.: St. Louis Weekly Gazette image location
Saint Louis Weekly Journal 1857- 1878 Wolcott and Hume, publishers. image location
Saint Louis Weekly News 1854? Charles G. Ramsey. Also Weekly St. Louis Evening News and Intelligencer. image location
Saint Louis Weekly Union 1845- 1848 L. Pickering & Co. publisher image location
Saint Louis Woman's Work 1919- 1923 A monthly journal presenting the civic and social service work of the women in St. Louis, published by the Board of Religious Organizations. Mrs. Manly J. Preaher, editor. image location
Salisbury-Broadway-Water Tower Community News 1931- ? H.E. Huneke, publisher. image location
Sängerbote : lyrisches Quartalheft. 1913 Sängerbote-Gesellschaft, publisher. Quarterly featuring music with lyrics in German and English. image location
The Saturday Blade 1891- 1894 Weekly. image location
The Saturday Evening Post 1846- ? “Devoted to Temperance, Literature, the Arts and Sciences,and Agriculture.” W.F. Chase, editor. image location
Saturday Evening Post and Temperance Recorder 1846- 1847 image location
Saturday News 1837 ​As early as 1837, [Charles] Keemle and Major Alphonso Wetmore started a literary weekly called the Saturday News. They published several issues which were very creditable. They were ahead of the city. Keemle’s ideals were high. (From St. Louis, the Fourth City by Walter Barlow Stevens, 1909). Lasted less than a year.  Var.: Missouri Saturday News image location
Saturday Union Record 1888- 1918? F.E. Marlow, editor image location
Sauce Magazine 1999- New Magazine Springs from WebsiteBy Jeff Stark             Entertainment and restaurant guides have a long history of basing content on which restaurants advertise, and St. Louis’ newest publication – Sauce Magazine – is no different.             Sauce Magazine – which debuted in October – follows Bent Mind Creative Group’s successful website, www.SauceCafe.com. The website is an advertising network, where restaurants image location
Sayings 1882- 1888 ​      image location
The Scanner 1983- Michael Britt, editor/publisher. Free monthly serving South St. Louis County. image location
School and Home Journal 1884- 1900 School and Home, William Lyman Thomas, editor and proprietor, has met with marked success. It is an illustrated semi-monthly. It has a very large circulation, being used in the city public schools. Thomas was a writer on the staff of The St. Louis Home Journal in 1870, 1871 and 1872. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, image location
The Scope 1950 Brentwood. Var.: Brentwood Scope image location
The Sehara Tribune 2009- ? image location
Self-Culture 1895- 1900 J.H. Battle, editor. image location
The Semi-Weekly News 1896? St. Charles image location
Senior Circuit 1987- Senior CircuitBy Elizabeth Freeman             When A.A. Zarky and his wife, Karen Lawrence Zarky, set out to publish a monthly publication aimed at senior citizens, their basic desire was to be “informative, entertaining and upbeat.”             Zarky, a printer, and his wife, a former printing sales representative, elected to make Senior Circuit their full-time pursuit when they decided to fill image location
The Sentinel 1864- P.M. Pinckard, editor and proprietor. image location
Sentinel-Democrat 1919- 1926 O.E. Morton, proprietor.  “The only Democratic paper published in a county which has a population of 100,000.” image location
Sex and St. Louis 1976 Quarterly published by J.M.J. Associates. "Our magazine will deal with the different aspects of sex in an open, direct manner. Particularly sex in St. Louis. However, we hope that you will not think our title limiting, because we will not let it limit us. We will sometimes delve into other areas of interest, but our emphasis will always be image location
Shattinger's Musical Review 1882- 1884 A monthly publication of articles and sheet music from A. Shattinger. image location
Shepherd of the Valley 1832- 1855 The first religious periodical published in St. Louis, and probably in the Mississippi Valley, was the Shepherd of the Valley, Catholic, in 1832, edited by Bishop Rosati. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri edited by Howard L. Conard, 1902). In 1834 or 1835 the Shepherd of the Valley was established as the organ of the Catholic Church. In 1851, R.A. Bakewell image location
Shepherd of the Valley-New Series 1851- 1854 “A statement of Catholic truths.” Robert E. Phillips, editor and publisher. (1852 Robert A. Bakewell, editor and publisher). Purchased by High and Gilman, who renamed it True Shepherd of the Valley and St. Louis Know-Nothing. image location
Shoe and Leather Gazette 1910 Weekly. Published by Root Newspaper Association. image location
Side Streets 1996- ? Marti Frumhoff, publisher. Quarterly. “The Midwest Documentary Project Journals.” image location
Signal 1882- 1886 Published in East St. Louis Var.: Weekly Signal image location
The Signal 1850- 1853 A paper called the Morning Signal…began on the first of January, 1852. The Signal was the enterprise of a group of printers, some of whom became prominent in after years. These printers included Charles G. Gontner, Joseph L. Craft, Robert McKee, John F. Frazier, M. C. Libby. A partner in this newspaper venture was J. Wilson McDonald who [later] image location
The Sirocco 1910 N.P.L. Rosch, publisher. Advocacy magazine. "The Sirocco will devote part of its pages to exposing and the extermination of the White Slave Trade. And print a list of the Houses and Owners of Ill-Fame in the State of Missouri and all persons who profit by that traffic. And will advocate legislation and ordinances which will compel the owners of image location
Slam! 1995?- 2000 Gay news publication image location
Slant 1944- 1946 Slant Publishing. Jennie Rutledge Bogy, Editor/publisher. image location
Slasher 1844 Weekly Democratic campaign paper. image location
Snark 1878- J. L. Watson, editor image location
Snicker 1987- 2003 Snicker FoundingBy Elizabeth Freeman             Snicker, billed as “The Humor Magazine of St. Louis,” showcases the cartoon work of an entirely homegrown cast in its premier issue. Familiar names like R.J. Shay, formerly of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and John Blair Moore, who pens “Pop Gasket’s New Ace Hardware Store” are featured, along with the work of others like Bob image location
Social Democratic Herald 1899       image location
Social Revolution 1917?- 1918? Socialist. Phil Wagner, publisher. image location
Society News 1929 "Wholesome, Constructive and Literally Clean" Monthly. American Publishing Corporation. J.G. Hartwig, editor. "The artistry and perfection of this publication is the handiwork of Master Craftsmen. Engravings are by Barnes-Crosby Co., and the press work by Watchman-Advocate." image location
Sonntagsblatt 1872- 1924 Anton Hellmich, publisher. Operated under many names, all including Sonntagsblatt. image location
Sophisticated Living 2013- High Net Worth Media, publisher, Craig Kaminer, editor. Seven issues per year. image location
South and West 1880- 1887 South and West was founded by Alfred Avery...in August, 1880. In 1882 it was sold to the Deere-Mansur Publishing Company, who issued it until about 1887. It was a semimonthly "for the farm and household," and paid some attention to popular literature. Prior to 1882 it was edited by Alfred Avery, after that date by John M. Stahl. (From the Encyclopedia image location
South Broadway News 1935?- 1936? Official publication of the South Broadway Merchants and Manufacturers Association image location
South County Journal 1960- ? Frank C. Bick, publisher. image location
South County News-Times 1989?- 1992? Weekly image location
The South County Times 1986- ? image location
South Kingshighway Journal 1931- 1932 image location
South Side Journal 1935- Leslie Crowe, editor; Frank X. Bick, publisher. image location
South Side Reporter 1895- 1898 Weekly. South Side Reporter Newspaper Printing Company. Was merged with two other papers into the St. Louis News. image location
South St. Louis Blade 1876 image location
South St. Louis Carondelet Review 1872- 1875? Became Carondelet Progress. image location
South St. Louis County News 1947- 1973? Thomas Wissbaum, managing director. image location
South St. Louis Neighborhood News 1922- 1970? Weekly. B.W. Nordman, publisher. Became Neighborhood News. image location
South St. Louis News 1875- 1876? image location
South St. Louis Progress 1899- 1900 Former Carondelet Progress. Progress Publishing Company. Henry E. Haas, editor and manager. Issued for the progress and advancement of South St. Louis. image location
South-Western Methodist 1885? image location
Southern Echo 1897? Southern Echo Publishing House – George H. Becker, president; Fred J. Sease, editor. image location
Southern Grocer 1885- 1898 Monthly review devoted to the mutual interests of the grocery and general trade, south and west, and of its publishers, Scharff, Bernheimer & Co., flour and provision dealers, grocers and commission merchants. image location
Southern Illinois Jewish Community News 1965- 1978 Renamed Jewish Community News. image location
Southern Review 1871- 1875 This is a large quarterly, edited by A. (Albert) T. (Taylor) Bledsoe, LL.D. It is a publication noted for its high character and ability, and, like the Journal of Speculative Philosophy, is creditable to the literature of the country. (From Mercantile, Industrial, and Professional St. Louis by Ernst D. Kargan, 1902) A publication containing philosophical and literary essays, some image location
Southsider 2019 Free weekly political paper. News and views from South St. Louis. Antonio French, publisher. image location
Southwestern Homeopathic Journal and Review 1847- 1850 The first homeopathic journal in St. Louis was the Southwestern Homeopathic Journal and Review, a sixteen-page monthly, the first issue of which appeared in August, 1847, under the editorial management of Dr. J.T. Temple. In April, 1850, Dr. Thomas Haughton became editor. Three volumes were issued. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri edited by Howard L. Conard, 1901). image location
Sovereign People 1840- 1841 Originally the Western Mirror and Ladies' Literary Gazette. Name changed in 1840. The paper ceased publication in 1841. image location
Sparkman Christian magazine. Marilyn Parker, editor. image location
Spectator 1880- 1893 The Spectator began its weekly observations of local society happenings, principally, and of theatrical and art matters, secondarily, on September 5, 1880. Captain W.R. Hodges' art criticisms and army reminiscences and an occasional editorial of J.R, Reavis - its editor during several years - were well worth reading. Miss Florence Hayward wrote stories, the irrepressible Colonel Pat Donan sometimes electrified its image location
Spirit 1877- 1881 The St. Louis Spirit was established about 1876, by Steele & Burt, as a weekly secret society paper. In about a year Steele retired, and Burt continued the publication until October, 1881, when the paper was consolidated with the Western Livestock Journal, which he had previously published. (From the History of St. Louis City and County by John Thomas image location
Spirit of 76 1840 The Spirit of '76 was a campaign paper run in the interests of Harrison and Tyler, the Whig candidates for President and Vice President during the campaign of 1840. It was first issued in July, 1840 and soon passed out of existence. (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois by Brink, McDonough & Co. 1881). image location
Spirit of Ferguson 1960- 1964 ​      image location
Spirit of St. Louis County 1959? - 1964? North County, published in Ferguson image location
Spirit of the Age 1875- 1890 Advertising sheet for J.H. McLean's patent medicines, thinly disguised as a newspaper. image location
The Spirit of the West 1854 Mallet & Willis published this weekly, devoted to local news tropics and family reading. It was politically independent and was published in Carondelet in 1854. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). Another source says it was published by Smith and McKee in 1851. image location
Splendid 2012- Splendid magazine is committed to celebrating the good things in life through engaging stories and compelling images that illustrate the extraordinary qualities of ordinary people in everyday life. Jean Lopez, publisher; Amy George Rush, editor. image location
The Sporting Goods Dealer 1899- ? A monthly journal devoted to the interests of sporting goods dealers and manufacturers. Charles Spink and W.W. Muir, publishers. image location
The Sporting News 1886- Publication's headquarters moved out of St. Louis in 2008. image location
Sports & Leisure 1993- 1994 Became St. Louis Life. image location
Sports Source 1994- Monthly. Morris Wisdom, editor/publisher. image location
Sports-Metro 1969- 1970 ​Monthly high school sports magazine. Robert Kolbrener, managing editor/Michael Doran Rudman, publisher/Ric Wilber, editor. image location
Sportsman 1901- 1937? ​Weekly. Sportsman Publishing Company. Var: County Life and the Sportsman, St. Louis Sportsman and Amateur Athlete. image location
Sportsnow 1983- 1984 Sporting News publication. Steven Friedman, editor; Richard Waters, publisher. image location
Spotlight 1944? Official organ of the downstate Negro Democratic League image location
Spotlight 1987- 1997 Spotlight Folds By Becky Mollenkamp             Ten years ago [1987] Bob Baker hand-delivered the first issue of Spotlight magazine – four typewritten pages covering the local music scene. Last month, Baker saw the last issue of his magazine hit the newsstands.             Baker folded the monthly because he wasn’t making money. But he says Get Out, the year-and-a-half old St. image location
Squares and Circles 1972- 2003 Publication of the Greater St. Louis Folk & Square Dance Federation. image location
Squatter 1848 L. Pickering & Company. Var: St. Louis Daily Union. image location
Squib 1893- 1905? Edward F. Bantzer, editor; Norbert J. Vorel, publisher. image location
St. Charles Advertiser 1844- 1846 Wilson L. Overall. Formerly the Free Press. Became the Missouri Patriot. image location
St. Charles Banner 1863- 1889 1904  Earl R. Britt, editor; Smith and Comann, publishers. Merged with News image location
St. Charles Banner-News 1904- 1978 Taps for Banner-News; Post Buys Subscribers, Girds for Circulation War             It was appropriate that the decision to close the St. Charles Banner-News was announced on Memorial Day. Like a fallen soldier, the paper died to the anguish of friends and to the eternal question: why?             As with most newspapers that fail, the answer will never be fully image location
St. Charles Chronotype 1849- 1853 N.C. Orear and J. Kibler, Jr., proprietors. Former Western Star. Later Reveille. image location
The St. Charles Clarion 1835- 1840 Founded by Nathaniel Patten, Jr. Became Free Press in 1840. image location
St. Charles Cosmos 1835- 1902 Merged with Monitor. image location
St. Charles Cosmos-Monitor 1902- 1959 St. Charles Publishing Company image location
St. Charles Cosmos-Sentinel 1867 After consolidation of the two papers. Name changed to Cosmos. image location
St. Charles County Business Record 2007?- ? image location
St. Charles County Community News 1921- ​Weekly. Huneke Publications. image location
St. Charles County Record Purchased from Disney Company by Dolan Media in 1997. image location
St. Charles Daily Banner-News 1904- 1956 News and Banner merged.  image location
St. Charles Daily Cosmos-Monitor image location
The St. Charles Daily Monitor 1894- 1902 Merged with Cosmos. “The Official Paper of the City of St. Charles.” Dunifer and Bode, proprietors. image location
St. Charles Daily News 1897?- ? J.G. Kinder, local editor. image location
St. Charles Daily News 1978- 1979 William Mullins, publisher. Subsidiary of Donnelly Publications, Inc. image location
St. Charles Demokrat 1852- 1916 German language image location
St. Charles Evening Banner 1897- ? “Official newspaper of the city” image location
St. Charles Free Press 1840- 1844 Former Clarion. Later Advertiser. image location
The St. Charles Journal 1881- 1882 T.G and G.S. Johns, editors image location
St. Charles Journal 1957- ? Bill Mullins, publisher image location
The St. Charles Kaleidoscope 1861? image location
The St. Charles Missourian 1820- 1822 Note in first issue of St. Charles Missourian: “owing to the great expense attending the establishment of a newspaper in this remote part of the country, and the difficulty of collecting subscribers, that payment in advance will always be preferred.” Var: The Missourian. Robert McCloud, (Joseph Charless’ stepson) publisher image location
The St. Charles Monitor 1894- 1902 Duniper & Bode, proprietors. image location
The St. Charles News 1867- 1897 “Our principles, and the principles of our party, are patriotism, honesty and economy.” William G. Bryan, editor. Merged with the Banner. image location
The St. Charles Republikaner 1880?- 1903? Zandjort and Wolf. image location
The St. Charles Reveille 1854- 1867 King and Emmons, editors and proprietors.  “Devoted to Literature, Agriculture and General Intelligence.” “The Supremacy of the Law – The Safeguard of the People.”Former Chronotype. Later consolidated with the Sentinel. image location
The St. Charles Sentinel 1866- 1867 Became the Cosmos-Sentinel. image location
St. Charles Sonntagsblatt 1872- 1879? image location
St. Charles Western Star Former Missouri Patriot. Later Chronotype. image location
The St. Charles Zeitung 1872- 1877? image location
St. Clair and Madison Counties Evening and Sunday Journal 1958- 1964 Former East St. Louis Journal. Became Metro-East Journal. image location
St. Clair Banner 1843 William C. Kinney, proprietor. Belleville image location
St. Clair Banner 1845- 1847 In 1845, Louis P. Pensoneau commenced publication of the St. Clair Banner. In 1847 he sold out to D.W. Gelwicks and Louis Tramble and they changed the name to the Belleville Times. (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois by Brink, McDonough & Co. 1881). image location
St. Clair County Herald 1982? ​Rube Yelvington, publisher. image location
St. Clair County Observer 1965- ? Publisher’s Statement of Policy This is the first issue of the St. Clair County Observer, a new weekly paper designed to bring you the news of happenings in your community. Its delivery to your home is made possible by the advertisers who use our columns. At the invitation of a representative group of merchants and the East St. Louis image location
St. Clair Daily Tribune 1875- 1878 Willis E. Finch & Brother established this paper in East St. Louis in February, 1875. The Tribune was politically Republican and had for its motto, “Republican, Protestant and Progressive.” In January, 1878, the Finch brothers suspended its publication and sold their type and other material to Messrs. Harney and Tissier, two young men of East St. Louis who, on image location
St. Clair Gazette 1833- 1838 In 1833, Robt. K. Fleming, editor and publisher of the Kaskaskia Recorder, was induced to move his press to Belleville by the prominent and representative men of St. Clair County, who pledged him their support and patronage. In accordance with their wishes he packed up the type and presses, and with his family, moved to Belleville. As soon as image location
St. Clair Mercury 1834?  In 1833, Robt. K. Fleming, editor and publisher of the Kaskaskia Recorder, was induced to move his press to Belleville by the prominent and representative men of St. Clair County, who pledged him their support and patronage. In accordance with their wishes he packed up the type and presses, and with his family, moved to Belleville. As soon as image location
St. Clair Tribune 1854- 1857 Formerly The Eagle, when the name was changed, John B. Hay and William Orr, the latter a young man of brilliant talents and a fine newspaper writer, became the editors. Mr. Hay possessed conspicuous journalistic talent. This arrangement continued a short time. The office was sold to Edward R. Stuart and G.A. Harvey, who remained editors and publishers until image location
St. Clair Weekly Tribune 1854- 1878? Formerly The Eagle, when the name was changed, John B. Hay and William Orr, the latter a young man of brilliant talents and a fine newspaper writer, became the editors. This arrangement continued a short time. The office was sold to Edward R. Stuart and G.A. Harvey, who remained editors and publishers until September 3d, 1854, when William E. image location
St. Louis 1895 image location
St. Louis & Southern Illinois Labor Tribune 1937- Weekly published by Labor Tribune Publishing Company. The official AFL-CIO voice of working people since 1937. image location
St. Louis Abend-Anzeiger 1901- 1912 (“St. Louis Evening Gazette”) Var: Abend-Anzeiger image location
St. Louis Ad-Writer 1899- 1903 image location
St. Louis Advance 1881- 1915 Black weekly. Phillip H. Murray, editor. Var.: Advance. image location
St. Louis Advantages Ad club weekly image location
St. Louis Advisor 1991- 1992 Bi-weekly publication for the gay community. image location
St. Louis Amateur 1890- 1891 Devoted to amateur journalism. William V. Huss, editor. image location
St. Louis American 1922 A high grade non-partisan and non-sectarian publication image location
The St. Louis American 1924- 1925 Founded by J.D. Flynn image location
The St. Louis American 1928- The St. Louis American             The St. Louis American came into being in 1928. It was the brainchild of three men: Dick Kent, owner of a fleet of taxicabs and the St. Louis Giants Baseball team; Charlie Turpin, leading politician and first Negro constable in St. Louis; and N.B. Young, Yale-trained lawyer and historian.             The American, not pulling any image location
The St. Louis and Canadian Photographer 1877- 1900 Originally Practical Photographer. Mrs. Fitzgibbon-Clark, Publisher and Proprietor. Became Bulletin of Photography. image location
St. Louis and Jefferson County News William A. McReynolds, publisher; Dorothy E. McReynolds, managing editor. image location
St. Louis Architect and Builder 1886- ? A journal devoted to building and architectural interests. image location
The St. Louis Area Family Gazette 2000- ? The local magazine for families image location
The St. Louis Argus 1912- The Birth of the St. Louis Argus Edwina W. Mitchell             On April 8, 1912, Joseph E. Mitchell registered the St. Louis Argus, a five-column tabloid-size newspaper, with the United States Post Office. Dr. Thomas Curtis, who had been associated with Mitchell in the insurance business, had suggested the name Argus, meaning a creature with a hundred eyes never closed image location
St. Louis At Home ​     image location
The St. Louis Athlete 1927- 1928 Dent McSkimming, editor. St. Louis’ own weekly sport paper. Official Organ of the St. Louis Ten Pin Bowling Association. Official Organ of the St. Louis District Tennis Association. image location
St. Louis Aviation News 1946- 1947 George E. Bounds, editor/publisher. Monthly. image location
St. Louis Beacon 1829- 1832 The name [Enquirer] was changed to the Beacon, [Charles] Keemle and Charles Orr ran the Beacon for several years but then discontinued it in 1832... With Charles Keemle editing the St. Louis Beacon, Senator [Thomas Hart] Benton had a newspaper to promote himself and his political causes. To keep the paper afloat, Benton worked to have the Beacon publish image location
St. Louis Bright Spots 1963 Free entertainment paper focusing on nightlife. Kern Beaty, editor image location
St. Louis Budget of Fun 1835 The St. Louis Budget of Fun was established in St. Louis in 1835. As the title suggests, it was to be a humorous paper. It became very popular and received a wide circulation. Little has been recorded of its actual history but its frequent mention in contemporary newspapers gives evidence of its popularity. The prospectus of the Budget of image location
St. Louis Builder 1899-1911 St. Louis Builder Publishing Company. Official organ of the Master Builders. See also Saint Louis Builder image location
St. Louis Business Journal 1980- St.Louis Business Journal Debuts With 40% AdvertisingBy Louis Rose             The St. Louis Business Journal, a weekly tabloid focusing on local financial news, made its debut Oct. 6 on schedule. The new entry weighed in with a 36-page issue – 12 more than originally planned – and a 40 percent advertising content.             (The second issue had the same amount image location
St. Louis Business Men's Informer 1924- 1925 St. Louis Negro Business Association image location
St. Louis Business Record 1949- 1951 A weekly newspaper serving the business & industrial interests of greater St. Louis. The Daily Record Company. Jack Thiess, editor. image location
St. Louis Call 1936- 1942 Chester A. Franklin, editor/publisher. Var: The Call image location
St. Louis Catholic Herald 1921- 1924 Catholic Herald Publications. Later American Consolidated Press. Became Catholic Herald. image location
St. Louis Catholic Historical Review Catholic Historical Society of St. Louis image location
St. Louis Chinese American News 1990- History of St. Louis Chinese American News Many Chinese immigrants in the St. Louis region were used to reading the Chinese newspaper to know local news - United States news, world news and home town news (China and Taiwan). Also, this big Chinese community needed a communication tool and bridge to the American community. Seeing the needs of a image location
St. Louis Chinese Journal 1996- Chinese Journal Serves Its CommunityBy Chris Chi             Located at 8517 Olive Blvd., the Chinese Journal has been publishing since about 2008.             The director/editor of the paper is Wen Hwang Hsia, a co-founder. She had previously been editor of a Chinese magazine in St. Louis that went out of business.             The Chinese Journal distributes about 8,000 free copies, image location
The St. Louis Christian Advocate 1851- 1931 A publication of the Methodist Episcopal Church South begun by Rev. D.R. McAnally as editor. (In 1909 “Christ for the World and the World for Christ.” B. Palmore, editor) image location
St. Louis Chronicle 1891- 1905 The city’s first penny paper, published by the Scripps-McRae League, which also owned papers in Kansas City, Cincinnati, Cleveland and Covington, KY.  Purchased by Nathan Frank in 1905 and merged into the Star-Chronicle. Chronicle was later sold to E.G. Lewis.   The Chronicle is the only one-cent daily paper in the city. Its editor, General Hawkins, has completely remodeled image location
St. Louis City 1834 image location
St. Louis Clinical Record 1875- 1882 Monthly journal of medicine and surgery. W.B. Hazard, editor. image location
St. Louis Clinical Review 1878- 1884 Monthly 36-page journal of homeopathic medicine and surgery published by J.H. Chambers Printing Company. Dr. Philo G. Valentine, editor. Merged with the St. Louis Periscope and Medical Review of Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery to become The St. Louis Periscope and Medical Review. image location
St. Louis Clinique 1887- 1914 A monthly journal of clinical medicine and surgery. Merged with Medical Fortnightly and Laboratory News. image location
St. Louis Commerce 1926- 2012 Regional Commerce and Growth Association. image location
St. Louis Commercial Advertiser 1871- 1876 Weekly published by DeJournette & Company. image location
St. Louis Commercial Advertiser 1826- 1827 Major William Orr, editor; Charles Keemle, publisher. Var: Commercial Advertiser. image location
St. Louis Commercial Bulletin 1835- 1836 The Commercial Bulletin was established in 1836 by Colonel Charles Keemle, formerly of the Beacon, William Preston Clark and Samuel B. “Steamboat” Churchill. The following prospectus marked its appearance in this city: “C. Keemle again presents himself to his friends and fellow citizens in the character of Editor and Publisher of a paper. “The Commercial Bulletin and Missouri Literary image location
St. Louis Commercial Bulletin and Missouri Literary Register 1835- 1836 The Commercial Bulletin was established in 1836 by Colonel Charles Keemle, formerly of the Beacon, William Preston Clark and Samuel B. “Steamboat” Churchill. The following prospectus marked its appearance in this city: “C. Keemle again presents himself to his friends and fellow citizens in the character of Editor and Publisher of a paper. “The Commercial Bulletin and Missouri Literary image location
St. Louis Commercial Gazette 1873- 1883 W. L. Thomas, publisher. Became Legal News. Former Home Journal and Commercial Gazette. “Devoted to the Commercial, Financial, Manufacturing and Agricultural Interests of the Mississippi Valley.”  Ricker and Thomas, proprietors. image location
St. Louis Commercial News and Labor Gazette 1908- 1915 Semi-monnthly. George W. Briggs, editor/publisher. Var: Commercial News and Labor Gazette image location
St. Louis Community News 1963?-1981? image location
St. Louis Connoisseur 1999- 2000 William Mathis, publisher; Ellie Jones, editor. image location
St. Louis Construction News & Review 1969- Thomas Finian, publisher. image location
St. Louis Construction Record 1954- 1970 Lucius B. Morse, publisher. Var. Construction Record image location
St. Louis Countian 1902- 1986? Name changed from The Courier. “Dedicated by the Circuit Court of St. Louis County to publish the official records of the Court.  Countian Publishing Company. “Purpose: The duty and privilege of this newspaper is to render complete factual service to the business and professional interests of St. Louis County. In furtherance of this obligation it will continue to be image location
St. Louis County Advocate 1896- 1903 Frederick Essen, president; James N. Barnes, editor.  “Always Republican. Always American.”  “The Official Organ of St. Louis County” Merged with St. Louis County Watchman.  image location
St. Louis County Herald 1903- 1924 [It] is a six-column quarto, published monthly by Charles J. Henninger, who was associated with and worked under the direction of Charles R. Black for many years. The Herald is published in Wellston and it requires ability to produce a publication in a critical community that will last. The Herald shows no signs of decrepitude. (Originally published in the History image location
St. Louis County Journal 1965?- ? Formerly Wellston Journal. image location
St. Louis County Leader 1923- 1954 William Pfeifer, editor. Leader Printing and Publishing. Became St. Louis County Leader and Legal Record. image location
St. Louis County Leader and Legal Record 1936- 1958 Weekly. Leader Printing and Publishing Company. Var.: St. Louis County Leader image location
St. Louis County Messenger 1923- 1929 See Messenger. image location
St. Louis County Messenger 1957- 1971 A.E. Rosenblatt, publisher. Var: Maplewood Observer. image location
St. Louis County News 1907- 1914 image location
St. Louis County News 1877 The St. Louis County News came out January 30, 1877. The gentlemen connected with the News were Cortez A. Kitchen (a man of great ability who occupied many positions of honor and trust under the state and city governments, as well as having most creditably a vast number of newspaper assignments), General Marcus J. Wright, D.C. Irwin and Samuel Hager. image location
St. Louis County Observer 1934- 1971 Robert Henry Hall, editor; Abner E. Rosenblatt, publisher. The St. Louis County Observer is an independent newspaper, devoting itself entirely to the welfare of St. Louis Countians. In politics its sole insistence is that there be no violation of the public trust by any office-holder, regardless of party affiliation. First issue published May 10, 1934. Name changed to Observer and image location
St. Louis County Republican 1878- 1879 In the Fall of 1878 Mr. Robert B. Crossman, of the City of St. Louis, began the publication of the St. Louis County Republican. It was issued from Kirkwood and was a staunch Republican weekly. It was a seven-column folio, ably edited, neatly printed and kindly received in the county, especially in Kirkwood and vicinity. The way the new venture image location
St. Louis County Road and Bridge Bulletin 1916 image location
St. Louis County Sentinel 1904- 1909 Webster Groves. image location
St. Louis County Sentinel 1919- 1924 Sentinel Publishing Company.  Became Sentinel Democrat. image location
St. Louis County Star 1984- 1988 Donnelly Publishing. Gene Saffern, editor image location
St. Louis County Wachter 1870- 1910 “The Wachter is the only German paper in St. Louis County and has the largest circulation of any newspaper published in this county.” A newspaper published in the German language was established by Mr. C. W. Eck, who founded the County Wachter, of Clayton, a German newspaper, recently [1910] discontinued. In 1879, Frank W. Rauchenstein, a bright and practical image location
St. Louis County Watchman 1881- 1903 Name changed to Watchman-Advocate. The first issue of the St. Louis County Watchman appeared September 29, 1881. Eck & Rauchenstein were the publishers and proprietors and Thomas B. Miller was the editor. F.W. Rauchenstein purchased Mr. Eck’s interests a year later and was sole owner of the paper up to the time of his death, which occurred in December, image location
St. Louis Courier 1828 In December 1828 the Whig Republican announced the start-up of a Jacksonian newspaper, the St. Louis Courier. By the end of the month, the Republican announced that the Courier had ceased publication. (From Rising on the River by Frederick A. Hodes, 2009). Duff Green, proprietor. Paper went under after two issues. image location
St. Louis Courier 1892 Sheridan Webster, publisher. Weekly. image location
St. Louis Courier 1874 German language paper produced by the St. Louis Courier Company. image location
St. Louis Courier of Medicine 1881- 1890 A monthly journal of practical medicine and surgery. Dr. Nelson, managing editor. Formerly St. Louis Courier of Medicine and Collateral Sciences. image location
St. Louis Courier of Medicine and Collateral Sciences 1879- 1881 Medical Journal Association of Missouri. Became St. Louis Courier of Medicine. image location
St. Louis Critic 1876- 1900 An illustrated review of fun and light literature, art and life, with numerous illustrations and a large variety of social, sporting and general news. John D. Finney, editor/St. Louis Critic Publishing Company. Var.: Critic   image location
The St. Louis Critic 1884-1897 In 1884 Dickison Brugman purchased The St. Louis Dramatic Critic, dropped the word "Dramatic" from its title, and changed it into a general local and sporting paper. Later on it became the property of William Frudeneau and devoted more space to local politics, municipal affairs and family literature. It was Democratic in its party affiliations. It suspended in 1897. From image location
St. Louis Crusader 1961- 1962 William Hatchett, Jr., Publisher and General Manager; William P. Russell, Editor-in-Chief. The St. Louis Crusader is a weekly newspaper for the Metropolitan St. Louis area that will at all times present true, unadultrated facts in its news stories and current features. The news will be presented fairly, but squarely. Neither money nor friendship will sway this newspaper from its image location
St. Louis Cycle News 1971- Linda Kassing, publisher; Gene Whitaker, editor. Monthly image location
St. Louis Daily American 1844- 1857? “The Home of the Free, or the Tomb of the Brave”  By H.H. Holton (1845)   "An American Organ" J.D. Learned, editor and publisher. image location
St. Louis Daily Bulletin 1859- ? J.L. Bittinger, publisher. image location
St. Louis Daily Chronicle 1873- This ably edited paper is owned by Mr. Francis Saler and Mr. Adelbert Loehr. It has not been in existence many years, but has already a large circulation and a widespread influence. (From Edwards' Great West and A Complete History of St. Louis by Richard Edwards and Dr. M. Hopewell, 1860). Daily. William R. Cranna, publisher. image location
St. Louis Daily Evening Bulletin 1859- 1861 John L. Bittinger, editor. Var: Evening Bulletin, St. Louis Evening Bulletin. image location
St. Louis Daily Evening Herald and Commercial Advertiser 1835 In 1835 the Daily Evening Herald and Commercial Advertiser attempted daily publication. The paper commented that Louisville had two daily papers and Cincinnati had four dailies while it appeared St. Louis could not support one. The paper did not survive the year. (From Rising on the River by Frederick A. Hodes, 2009). R. M. Treadway & J. W. Albright, image location
St. Louis Daily Evening News 1852- 1867 Charles G. Ramsey and Company. Abraham Mitchell, editor; Daniel Grissom, associate editor. See also Daily Evening News and Intelligencer, St. Louis Evening News, St. Louis Evening News and Intelligencer. Paper was shut down briefly during the Civil War when General Charles Fremont sent his provost marshal to arrest Charles Ramsey. The general disliked the paper’s editorial stance. image location
The St. Louis Daily Express 1858- ? The St. Louis Daily Express was established in 1858, by Wm. Cuddy (also found spelled as Cody), a gentleman for many years practically connected with journalism. Its first issue was in a miniature form, which continued for some months, until its increasing patronage justified its increasing size. It is now a large and respectable sheet, and progressing in influence image location
The St. Louis Daily Globe 1872- 1875 William McKee and Daniel Houser, publishers. image location
The St. Louis Daily Herald 1852- ? ​This popular sheet was established in December, 1852. It is at present owned and ably edited by Mr. James L. Faucett, under whose efficient management it has reached an extensive circulation. It has a daily circulation, and likewise an extensive weekly one. (From Edwards’ Great West ...And A Complete History of St. Louis by Richard Edwards & M. Hopewell, M.D., image location
St. Louis Daily Intelligencer 1851 George Budd, Proprietor and Commercial Editor. Yeatman, Ramsey & Company. Var: St. Louis Intelligencer, Daily St. Louis Intelligencer. image location
St. Louis Daily Journal 1871- 1876? St. Louis Daily Journal James William Buel and Joseph A. Dacus             This paper is an outgrowth of the old Journal of Commerce, a weekly newspaper established in 1858. About 1871, Mr. W.V. Wolcott, in connection with some other gentlemen, conceived the project of establishing a daily newspaper. The Journal was commenced as an afternoon paper, under the editorial image location
St. Louis Daily Leader 0 image location
St. Louis Daily Ledger 1851 T.H. Cavanaugh, publisher. image location
St. Louis Daily Livestock Reporter 1901- 1930 Reporter Publishing Company, National Stock Yards, Illinois.  Var.: National Live Stock Reporter, St. Louis Daily National Live Stock Reporter. image location
St. Louis Daily Market Reporter 1869- Griffin & O'Connor, publishers. Var: St. Louis Market Reporter, St. Louis Daily Market Reporter and Merchants Exchange Price Current. image location
St. Louis Daily Market Reporter and Merchants Exchange Price Current 1866 Var: St. Louis Market Reporter, St. Louis Daily Market Reporter. image location
St. Louis Daily Morning Herald 1852- 1860? Russell S. Higgins returned to St. Louis in 1852 and associated himself with Phillip G. Ferguson on the Morning Herald. It became a paying paper. He sold out his interest in the Herald about 1854 and moved away…Mr. Higgins was almost alone of the newspaper proprietors of those days who could show a good balance at the end of image location
St. Louis Daily Morning Post 1846- Another paper of brief duration was the Morning Post. The first issue appeared in December, 1846 under the direction of Mantz, Conn and Co. Althoujgh the editorials were sensible and good-natured, and the advertising columns promising, it did not long survive. (From Early St. Louis Newspapers, 1808-1850, a Washington University dissertation by Dorothy Grace Brown, 1931). image location
St. Louis Daily News 1881- 1882 A morning paper with this title appeared Nov. 6, 1881. It was a seven-column quarto, was modeled upon the New York Sun, and sold for two cents a copy. It was Democratic in politics, and among its stockholders were several capitalists of that political complexion. Edwin Harrison was president of the publishing company, George Mills was vice-president and secretary, image location
St. Louis Daily News 1904- 1909 St. Louis News Publishing and Printing Company. "Official paper of: the North St. Louis Business Men's Assoc., South Broadway Merchants' Assoc., West End Business Men's Assoc., and South-Western Mercantile Assoc." image location
St. Louis Daily News 1945 Published by the Newspaper Inter-union Conciliation Committee. Only five issues published. Strike paper. "Your new newspaper - the St. Louis Daily News - makes its bow today in response to an emergency. This emergency was created by the failure of the St. Louis Publishers Association to resolve a labor dispute which it has had under discussion for 20 months. image location
St. Louis Daily News 1986 Third St. Louis Daily Makes Debut; Small Staff, Big Ambitions At “News”             Since the folding of the St. Louis Star-Times, St. Louis has been a two-newspaper town. With the arrival of the St. Louis Daily News, an evening daily, St. Louis is among the very few cities which can boast again of three dailies.             The first issue, image location
St. Louis Daily News and Daily Hotel Reporter 1905?- ? “Official Paper of St. Louis Merchants and Manufacturers”  “Official Paper of St. Louis Hotels and Their Patrons”  Daniel C. Donovan, president and manager. St. Louis News Publishing and Printing Company. Var.: News and Daily Hotel Reporter. image location
St. Louis Daily Press 1864- 1866 Charles P. Johnson, editor/part owner. Press Association. image location
St. Louis Daily Press 1978- 1979 ​Strike paper. Stern Publications. image location
St. Louis Daily Record 1890- ? Listing of major real estate transactions, lawsuits, bankruptcies, births, deaths, divorces and marriages. Founded by Hiram Morse. Later owned by Lucian B. Morse III who sold it to Business Journal Publications in 1986. Purchased by Disney Company in 1995, who sold it to Dolan Media in 1997. image location
The St. Louis Daily Times 1866- 1881 The St. Louis Times Joseph A. Dacus and James William Buel             In the beginning of July, 1866, it was announced that the St. Louis Daily Times, “an uncompromising Democratic newspaper,” would be published during that month in this city. A few weeks later the first number of the paper appeared. It was originated by D.A. Mahoney, Stilson Hutchins and image location
St. Louis Daily Union 1846- 1867 L.C. Pickering & Company. Var: Daily Union, St. Louis Daily Morning Union, St. Louis Union, Squatter. image location
St. Louis Dawn 1902? image location
St. Louis Defender 1961- 1965 Weekly. Charles S. Hakins, publisher. image location
The St. Louis Democrat 1844- 1875          In 1853 William McKee got control of the Democrat. Associated with him were Daniel M. Houser and George W. Fishback. McKee and Houser, dissatisfied with Fishback’s management, withdrew and founded the Globe. Later they merged the two as the Globe Democrat. The name Democrat was retained even though the paper has always been what we call Republican.             (From image location
St. Louis Design Magazine 2003- ? Barbara Walter, editor/publisher. image location
St. Louis Dining 1984- 1986 For its debut number, St. Louis Dining, a new St. Louis magazine, lunched with Jack Carney. In its second number, publisher Greg Holzhauer supped with KMOX-TV anchor, now ex-anchor, Steve Schiff. “Last Course” was the name of the column featuring Schiff. Is it true restaurants now empty at the sight of the editors of Dining with patrons fearing The image location
St. Louis Dispatch 1864- 1874 The St. Louis Dispatch, the leading evening paper, is a successor of the Evening News, formerly published by Charles G. Ramsey, Esq. The Dispatch was successfully conducted for a time by William McHenry and Peter L. Foy. It was subsequently sold to other parties, Mr. D. Robert Barclay becoming one of the purchasers. The parties holding a majority of image location
The St. Louis Dramatic Critic 1882- 1884 The St. Louis Dramatic Critic was first issued on December 21, 1882, by S.G. Webb, John T. Smith and F.B. Rotrock. Its editor was Alexander R. Webb...In 1884 Dickison Brugman bought it, dropped the word "Dramatic" from its title, and changed it into a general and local paper. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
St. Louis Dramatic News 1906- 1909 Weekly, devoted to the Theater, Musical and Allied Arts and Interests. Richard Spencer, editor/publisher. image location
St. Louis Druggist 1882- 1886 On the 1st of September, 1882, appeared the St. Louis Druggist, a weekly journal devoted to the interests of retail pharmacists, and published by the Druggist Publishing Company, of which the publisher and manager is W.H. Coulter; Vice-President, W.A. Fritsche; Secretary and Treasurer, George S. Weare; Editor, J.A. Peters. (From the History of St. Louis City and County by image location
St. Louis Dry Goods Reporter 1872- 1897 The St. Louis Dry Goods and Grocery Reporter,  H.F. Zider, editor/publisher, was begin in 1872. It was issued weekly and contained one hundred and twenty-eight pages of material. It ran through some fifteen years of publication and was one of the few papers of its class in the United States at the time. (From the Enclopedia of the History of Missouri by image location
St. Louis Echo 1878- 1880 The St. Louis Echo,  Westbrook & Keller, publishers, was a weekly, devoted to the interests of the Greenback party. John Samuel was its editor. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
St. Louis Economist 1876?- 1879 Monthly. R. Tompkins, editor. image location
St. Louis Edge 1998 Todd Showalter, editor/publisher. image location
St. Louis Emigrant 1817- 1819 Colonel [Charles] Keemle’s newspaper connections began on the Emigrant. That was the paper which under the name of the Western Journal was started in 1815 on a fund of $1,000 raised by citizens who wanted to fight Colonel Charless’ Gazette. Keemle was a Philadelphian. He was only seventeen years old when he came to St. Louis but he had worked image location
The St. Louis Enquirer 1818- 1829 In 1818 the Emigrant was purchased by Isaac N. Henry, Evarist Maury, and Col. Thomas H. Benton, the firm being Isaac N. Henry & Co., and the name was changed to the St. Louis Enquirer. For some years Col. Benton was the chief editor. In 1820, William Henry died and Mr. Maury withdrew, whereupon Patrick H. Ford took possession image location
St. Louis Es Videke 1913- 1969 Hungarian. Coloman Kaldor, editor; Hungarian Publishing Company.   (1958 “Consolidated with St. Louisi Hirlap and Illinoisi Kozlony”) image location
St. Louis Evangelist 1875- 1887 The St. Louis Evangelist was originally a Presbyterian monthly, founded in January, 1875, by the Rev. J.W. Allen...In the fall of 1882 the Presbyterian News Company was organized (with twenty thousand dollars capital) to publish The Evangelist as a weekly, and in January, 1883, the paper so appeared. (From the History of St. Louis City and County by John image location
St. Louis Evening Bulletin 1859- ? The Evening BulletinRichard Edwards and Dr. M. Hopewell             This already popular journal was established in 1859 by Messrs. Peckham & Bittenger, who, in a few months afterward, disposed of it to Mr. Eugene Longmaier, a young gentleman of fine attainments, who has commenced his editorial career with much promise.             Mr. Longmaier is particularly suited to the atmosphere of image location
St. Louis Evening Missourian 1861?- ? image location
St. Louis Evening News 1852- 1857, 1858- 1867 The Evening News, a two-cent Democratic journal, was established April 17, 1852, by Charles G. Ramsey and Abraham S. Mitchell. It was edited with ability, and soon attained a considerable popularity. In 1860 its circulation had increased to four thousand copies daily, seven thousand weekly and five hundred tri-weekly. The editor was Abraham S. Mitchell, and the associate editor image location
St. Louis Evening News 1984 ​ Jeffrey Gluck, publisher.   image location
St. Louis Evening News and Intelligencer 1858?- ? Charles G. Ramsey & Company. See also St. Louis Evening News, St. Louis Daily Evening News and Daily Evening News and Intelligencer. image location
St. Louis Evening Pilot 1854- 1856 Merged with St. Louis Leader. Var.: Pilot. image location
St. Louis Evening Post 1878 The St. Louis Evening Post Joseph A. Dacus and James William Buel The youngest, and at the same time the most vivacious, brightest and interesting of St. Louis newspapers, is the Evening Post. The first number of this paper was issued January 10, 1878, by John A. Dillon, Esq., formerly editor of the Globe, and then on the staff image location
St. Louis Evening Post 1869 George Nagus, publisher. Var.: Saint Louis Evening Post image location
St. Louis Evening Star 1878- 1879 ​Var.: Evening Star, Saint Louis Evening Star.      image location
St. Louis Evening Star Sayings 1888- 1895 Purchased by Nathan Frank, who renamed it the St. Louis Star Chronicle. image location
St. Louis Evening Union By Richard Phillips .Charles P. Johnson, editor/part owner. image location
St. Louis Examiner 1881 P.P. Ingalls came to St. Louis from Iowa in 1881 and issued The St. Louis Examiner. It was the organ of the Greenback party  in St. Louis. In less than a year he sold it to The Iowa State Journal. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
St. Louis Family 2011- Leslie Tunney, publisher image location
St. Louis Fan 1968- 1974 Gary Reim, Managing Editor. Fan/Sport, Inc. image location
St. Louis Finance 1897- 1898 A review of Southwestern investments, banking, realty, economics. Finance Publishing Company. image location
St. Louis Free Press 1832- 1833 Var.: Free Press. image location
St. Louis Free Press 1968- 1969 Bi-weekly anti-establishment paper. image location
St. Louis Freidenker 1872 image location
St. Louis Furniture Magazine 1879-1887 Monthly. Official organ of the Furniture Manufacturers' Exchange of St. Louis. F. H. Burgess - Proprietor image location
St. Louis Furniture Manufacturer 1879- 1884 The St. Louis Furniture Manufacturer, established Jan. 1, 1879, by C.F. Anderson, formerly of Cincinnati, is devoted exclusively to the furniture interests of St. Louis. It circulates generally in the region tributary to St. Louis, and is the organ of the St. Louis Furniture Exchange. (From the History of St. Louis City and County by John Thomas Scharf, 1883). image location
St. Louis Furniture News 1887- 1912 Monthly devoted to the furniture and kindred trade. Richard Dallam, editor. Official organ of the St. Louis Furniture Board of Trade. Furniture Gazette Publishing Company. Var.: Furniture News image location
St. Louis Gazette 1880- Monthly. F. F. Gottschalk, editor/publisher. Monthly. image location
The St. Louis Globe 1872- 1875 When the Globe appeared on the 18th of July, 1872, its platform was announced in these words: "In the prevalence or overthrow of Republican principles is wrapped up the thrift and glory or the ruin and disgrace of the American people." The editor was a newspaper man of fifteen years' experience in St. Louis, Charles R. Davis - a image location
St. Louis Globe Digest 1988- 1989 ​      image location
The St. Louis Globe-Democrat 1875- 1985 Historical Sketch of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat The slavery question was page one news when the career of the Globe-Democrat began. Establishment of the Missouri Democrat in August, 1852, by William McKee and William Hill, answered the need for a strong newspaper to back the cause of emancipation and union in Missouri. The Missouri Democrat staunchly supported Abraham Lincoln image location
St. Louis Globe-Democrat 1997- ​Monthly paper featuring historic news and features. Steve De Bellis, editor/publisher. Formerly St. Louis Inquirer. image location
St. Louis Grocer 1878- 1904 The St. Louis Grocer dates back to January, 1878. Greeley, Burnham & Co., were its first publishers. In February, 1881, it was sold to the Grocer Publishing Company. It is devoted to grocery matters, interests, etc...It is one of the largest newspapers of its class in the country. A.D. Cunningham was its first editor. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by image location
St. Louis Grocer and General Merchant 1878- 1900 A Journal for Retail Grocers.  E. Sprague and Charles Edwards, editors. Var.: Grocer and General Merchant. image location
St. Louis Guzzlers' Gazete 1962- 1963 "Entertainment For the Swinging Set." Bob Adams, Editor; A.R. Adams & Associates, publisher. Bi-weekly. image location
St. Louis Herald 1877?- 1878 The St. Louis Herald, an illustrated weekly, was the first "society" paper of St. Louis which had a decided influence and standing in the local social world. It flourished during fifteen months in 1877 and 1878; the daily newspapers did not pay attention to social matters in those days...so the field was fairly clear for a wide-awake weekly paper. In image location
St. Louis Herald 1868- General interest monthly paper published by Cole Brothers. "Any person who will send his name to this Office, giving his Post Office address and occupation or business, will be considered a subscriber for one year and will receive the paper free of charge. And as we wish to give our paper as large a circulation as possible this year, image location
St. Louis Home 1984- ? Don Hall, publisher; Barbara Clark, editor. Purchased by Pulitzer in 1990. image location
St. Louis Home Journal 1867- 1872 The St. Louis Home Journal was a four-page, blanket-sheet literary and general local weekly during the first year of its existence. The first number was issued on November 19, 1867, by Nelson M. Sheffield and B.D.M. Eaton. In an article in the St. Louis Republic in 1896, Mr. Eaton says: "Our idea was to follow the plan of the New York Home image location
St. Louis Home Journal 1891- 1909 Formerly the Suburban Home Journal. Devoted to St. Louis and her suburbs. image location
St. Louis Homes & Gardens 1993- 1996 St. Louis Homes & Gardens Debuts By Rick Stoff             St. Louis Homes & Gardens magazine is scheduled to debut in April [1993].             The bi-monthly publication is a spinoff from Kansas City Homes and Gardens, said publisher Joe Sweeney, former general manager of the Kansas City title.             He described the new publication as a “home shelter and lifestyle image location
St. Louis Homes & Lifestyles 1996- Weisner Publishing. Renamed from St. Louis Homes & Gardens. Gina Schreiber, publisher. Sold to Network Communications in 2005. Sold to Distinctive Lifestyles LLC in 2011. Suzie Osterloh, publisher. image location
St. Louis Hospital Bulletin 1893- 1901 Monthly devoted to hospital work and medical science. . image location
St. Louis Humorist 1879- 1909? A weekly founded by Henry Hermanns. Wolf & Company, editor/publisher. Var.: The Humorist. image location
St. Louis Idea 1916 Quarterly published by the Business Men's League of St. Louis. Lewis B. Ely, editor. image location
St. Louis Illustrated Magazine 1873?- 1894 In 1878, Thomas J. Gilmore commenced publication of The St. Louis Illustrated Magazine, which was devoted to light literature and illustrated fashions. In 1883 the controlling interest passed to Alexander N. De Menil, and the standard of the magazine was raised. Its fashion and household departments were dropped, and papers of a serious nature were substituted in their place. From 1883 image location
St. Louis Index 1871 The St. Louis Index, devoted to sporting topics - baseball, cricket, racingt, billiards, theatricals, prize fighting, etc. - was published weekly in 1871, by William Frazee.  (From the Encyclodepia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
St. Louis Inquirer 1986- 1997 Inquiring Minds Want to Know – Again and Again             A box in the upper left corner of the St. Louis Inquirer contains these words: “The best prophet of the future is the past.” This aphorism may explain why publisher Steve DeBellis decided to print only old news in his free monthly newspaper.             “Why old news? Because it’s interesting image location
St. Louis Intelligencer 1850- 1857 Yeatman, Ramsey & Co. (1850) Whig. George K. Budd, proprietor and commercial editor. Var: St. Louis Daily Intelligencer, Daily St. Louis Intelligencer, Weekly St. Louis Intelligencer, Intelligencer. Merged with the St. Louis Daily Evening News. “Richard S. “Dick” Elliott had, while a young man, some experience in the newspaper vocation in his native state of Pennsylvania, and when he left image location
St. Louis Jewish Light 1947 image location
St. Louis Journal of Commerce 1858- 1868? R.M.Widmar & Company. publishers. image location
St. Louis Journal of Homeopathy and Clinical Reporter 1897- 1911 Dr. W.A. Edmunds, editor; Schultz Publishing Company image location
St. Louis Journalism Review 1970- 2010 SJR Finds A New Home(Edited article by Charles Klotzer, published 7/2010)             It has been, and still is, exciting, often frantic, but always deeply satisfying for Rose, my wife, and me living with the St. Louis Journalism Review over these many years. In a way, it kept us sane, not going off the deep end in the pursuit of unobtainable image location
St. Louis Labor 1893- 1930 Socialist Party. English edition of Arbeiter-Zeitung. Replaced by Progressive Press. image location
St. Louis Labor Journal 1946? image location
St. Louis Labor Tribune 1937- Labor Tribune Breaking News  By Eliot Porter Has the Labor Tribune, the slender weekly tabloid organ of the AFL-CIO in the St. Louis region, become more newsy? Is it running more echt-news stories of general interest in addition to the puff pieces about union officials and the politicians who support them? Or, is it mostly an illusion, owing to image location
St. Louis Law Record 1871 Daily publication of news of the courts. image location
St. Louis Ledger 1878 The Ledger was launched April 13, 1878, by several former employees of the St. Louis Herald after a falling out with partner that effectively killed the Herald. The Ledger died after a few months.  (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
St. Louis Legals 1995?- 1998? Ronald Kuper, editor and publisher. image location
St. Louis Legionnaire 1920- ? Published by the St. Louis Executive Committee, American Legion. image location
St. Louis Life 1889- 1896 St. Louis Life, Mrs. S.V. Moore, publisher, began its career December 14, 1889. Its illustrations and one-half or its reading matter were "patent matter." Mrs. Grace Davidson purchased the paper  in 1895 and later changed its name to The Criterion. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
St. Louis Life 1993- 1995? St. Louis Life Struggles to Find Its NicheBy E.S. Evans             St. Louis Life is but a dream – though the 18-month-old family magazine appears to be coming true for Ellen Mrazek, a 31-year-old publisher reared in Webster Groves.             “I’ve always been infatuated with magazines; I grew up with them,” Mrazek says. “I always wanted to have my own, image location
St. Louis Life News 1994- Nick Kasoff, editor. Right-wing, "non-denominational, non-partisan publication, seeking to increase awareness and activism among its readers related to the issues of abortion and euthanasia." image location
St. Louis Light 1947- 1963 Jewish Welfare Fund of St. Louis. Var: Light. image location
St. Louis Lightning Express 1880 J.B. Follett. Negro newspaper image location
St. Louis Live Stock Reporter 1911-1929 ​     image location
St. Louis Live Stock Reporter and Weekly Price List 1872- 1877? ​“The Oldest Live Stock Paper West of the Mississippi.” Powell and Maynard, publishers. Var: Live Stock Reporter and Weekly Price List. Became Livestock and Tobacco Review, then St. Louis Livestock and Produce Review image location
St. Louis Lumberman 1880- 1924 Journal of Commerce Company, publisher; W.A. Barnes, managing editor. Var: National Lumberman, The Lumberman. Became Lumber. image location
St. Louis Luminary 1854- 1855 Erastus Snow, editor and publisher. “Devoted to Science, Religion, General Intelligence and News of the Day”  offices in basement of chapel at the corner of Fourth Street and Washington Avenue. Var: Luminary. image location
St. Louis Lutheran 1848?- ? ​Begun by Rev. F.W. Walther.Var: Lutheran. image location
St. Louis Magazine 1963- 1966 William H. Keenan, editor; John Arata, publisher. image location
St. Louis Magazine 1976- New Directions for St. Louis Magazine By Elizabeth Johnson Freeman The glossy, glitzy, and somewhat fluffy coffee table St. Louis Magazine is changing. Previously, it had been aimed at the upwardly mobile, west-county crowd. But that is certainly not going to be the case from here on out, says Tom Wood, newly appointed president of St. Louis Magazine, Inc. image location
The St. Louis Magnet 1848- 1849 The St. Louis Magnet, a monthly publication designed to illustrate the philosophy of human nature, was issued in 1848 by Dr. T.J. McNair. It was much too literary and philosophical to be ranked as a medical journal. In 1849 Drs. J.C. Heberling and F.G. Sitton purchased interests in the periodical, which was discontinued late in the same year. (From the Encyclopedia image location
St. Louis Manufacturer 1897- 1899 Published in the interest of St. Louis productions. image location
St. Louis Market News 1930- 1932 ​Levy Publishing Corporation. Name changed to Retailers’ Market News. image location
St. Louis Medical Advance 1889- 1890 Dr. N.M. Basket, editor image location
St. Louis Medical and Surgical Journal 1843- 1907 The St. Louis Medical and Surgical Journal conspicuously antedates all other medical publications, not only in the Mississippi Valley, but in America. Before it was but one, a Boston weekly, which soon disappeared, and it was two years after the Journal appeared before there was another medical monthly publication in the land. For years it stood alone in the vast region west of image location
St. Louis Medical Era 1891- 1904 Monthly journal of medicine and surgery. Dr. S.C. Martin, editor. image location
St. Louis Medical Gazette 1898- 1900 The [St. Louis] Medical Gazette, monthly, first appeared in June, 1898, Martin F. Engman, M.D., managing editor and proprietor. It covers all fields of medical and surgical science through departments conducted by staff writers and collaborators. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri edited by Howard L. Conard, 1901). Var: Medical Gazette. C.R.H. Davis, publisher. Became Medical Advisor. image location
St. Louis Medical Journal 1843- ? Founded by Dr. Moses Linton of the St. Louis University faculty. image location
St. Louis Medical Review 1875- 1912 Weekly. L.T. Risemeyer, editor/Medical Review Association, publisher. image location
St. Louis Medicine 1958- 1978 Publication of the St. Louis Medical Society. Dr. Charles Sherwin, editor. image location
St. Louis Merchants Journal 1901- 1902? W.B. Harris, editor. Var.: Merchants Journal. image location
St. Louis Metro Sentinel 1971- ? J. and H. Company. Var: Sentinel, St. Louis Sentinel, Metro Sentinel. image location
St. Louis Metropolitan Medicine 1978? Publication of the St. Louis Metropolitan Medical Society image location
St. Louis MetroVoice 1989- Var.: MetrovoiceMetrovoice Passes Plate By Don Corrigan             Metrovoice, a monthly which bills itself as the St. Louis Christian news and events publication, is apparently falling on hard times. Its the lead story in the July issue is a blatant appeal for money.             Readers are given 10 ways to raise dough for the publication, including a request to your image location
St. Louis Midland Farmer 1872- Weekly general agriculture and family paper. George W. Matthews and Company, publishers. image location
St. Louis Miller 1878- 1883 In December, 1878, Thomas & Stone, by request of several of the leading millers and mill-furnishing houses of St. Louis, began publishing the St. Louis Miller. The paper was successful from the first number. The proprietors are both young men. Mr. Thomas is a native of St. Louis; Mr. Stone was born near Cleveland, Ohio...The St. Louis Miller is image location
St. Louis Mining News 1887- ? Devoted to the interests of St. Louis and the Great West. George G. Bain, editor. Var.: Mining News image location
St. Louis Mirror 1846- ? Monthly. J.W. Barnsfield & Company, publisher. image location
St. Louis Mirror 1920 Col. Jacob Johnson Dickinson, editor. image location
St. Louis Mirror of Trade 1881 Rothermel Publishing Company. Only one issue published. image location
The St. Louis Mississippi Blatter 1910- 1928 image location
St. Louis Morning Herald 1852- 1856 Russell S. Higgins returned to St. Louis in 1852 and associated himself with Phillip G. Ferguson on the Morning Herald. It became a paying paper. He sold out his interest in the Herald about 1854 and moved away…Mr. Higgins was almost alone of the newspaper proprietors of those days who could show a good balance at the end of image location
St. Louis Morning Signal 1850- 1853 ​A paper called the Morning Signal…began on the first of January, 1852. The Signal was the enterprise of a group of printers, some of whom became prominent in after years. These printers included Charles G. Gontner, Joseph L. Craft, Robert McKee, John F. Frazier, M. C. Libby. A partner in this newspaper venture was J. Wilson McDonald who [later] image location
St. Louis Movie News 1935 Weekly entertainment journal published by Direct Advertising Service. Lester F. Kimbrell, editor. image location
St. Louis New Era 1840- 1850? By Charles G. Ramsey. Var: New Era image location
St. Louis New Times 1972- ? image location
St. Louis News 1897? The product of the merger of three publications - the North Side News, South Side Reporter, and West St. Louis. St. Louis News Publishing Company, Daniel C. Donovan, editor/manager. "The leading family magazine of the west." image location
St. Louis News 1901?- 1945? “For the family circle. Only respectable advertisements accepted.” “The leading family newspaper of St. Louis.” Daniel C. Donovan, editor and manager. image location
St. Louis News 1978- 1979 Strike paper. image location
St. Louis News Letter 1846- 1848 Literary and Catholic Journal. William J. Mullin, publisher. image location
The St. Louis Observer 1833- 1836 Some readers of his Times articles suggested that [Elijah] Lovejoy start a Presbyterian weekly. They offered to finance it. So the first issue of the St. Louis Observer appeared on November 22, 1833. Its sponsors were pleased until its editor took an extreme position on emancipation. They expostulated with the editor. Slavery was an evil, they agreed, but Missourians image location
St. Louis Outlaw 1970?- 1973? “Independent radical newspaper.”  Briefly affiliated with KDNA in 1970. "The St. Louis Outlaw is an independent, raical newspaper published every three weeks by the Outlaw collective - David, Dev, Fred, Lori and Terry...We are members of Liberation News Service (LNS)  and UPS. We subscribe to Pacific News Service (PNS) and the news service of the North American Congress on image location
The St. Louis Palladium 1903- 1907 John W. Wheeler, editor/publisher. Official organ of the U.B.F and S.M.T. Also the A.U.K. and D. of A. in the West. Negro paper.Wheeler’s writing was flashy and his high-profile activities in the community were often spotlighted in his articles.Wheeler was quick to take on the editors of the other Negro papers in St. Louis, and when a Jefferson City paper image location
St. Louis Parent 1986- 1993? S.J. Manning-Flannery, editor/publisher. image location
St. Louis Photographer 1883- 1889 St. Louis Photographic Publishing Company. image location
St. Louis Picayune 1878 Louis C. Tetard, former manager of the St. Louis Herald, launched the Picayune April 13, 1878, after a falling out with his partner that led to the demise of the Herald. The Picayune died after a few months. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
St. Louis Polyclinic 1889- 1890 Monthly, edited by the faculty of the post-graduate school of medicine.  "Each issue of the St. Louis Polyclinic will contain Original Communications from different members of the staff, Clinical Memoranda, Reports on Progress, Notes, Brevities, etc. Special attention will be given to REPORTS OF CASES occurring in different departments of the dispensary. Foreign News and Items will be regularly furnished image location
St. Louis Post 1846- 1878 John A Dillon sold the paper to be merged with the St. Louis Dispatch December 12, 1878, eleven months after he began publication. image location
St. Louis Post and Dispatch 1878 In a prospectus of December 13, 1878, young Pulitzer announced his objectives. He asserted that the Post and Dispatch would serve no party but the people, would follow no causes but its conclusions, and would not support the administration but criticize it. Furthermore, the platform pledged the paper to oppose all frauds and shams, to advocate principles and ideas image location
St. Louis Post-Dispatch 1878- Initially called The St. Louis Post and Dispatch. The and was dropped after two weeks. In 1881, the paper acquired the subscription list of  The Star. Acquired assets of The Star-Times in 1951. Entered into a Joint Operating Agreement with its morning rival, the Globe-Democrat in 1971. Switched from an afternoon to a morning paper in 1984. Sold to Lee image location
St. Louis Practical Photographer 1876- 1882, 1883- The St. Louis Practical Photographer is an illustrated monthly journal devoted to the elevation and improvement of the photographic art. It was established Jan. 1, 1876, by J.H. Fitzgibbon, by whom it has been managed ever since. This is next to the oldest photographic journal in America, and has a high standing in the photographic world. In the fall image location
St. Louis Price Current 1848- The St. Louis Price Current was established by Josiah Anderson in the fall of 1848, as an adjunct to the People's Organ. During 1848 and up to 1850, it was issued semi-weekly in letter-sheet form. In 1849, a semi-weekly edition of the Organ was commenced in conjunction with the letter-sheet, but in 1852, both editions, the Organ and the image location
St. Louis Railway Register 1875- 1878 This publication was established in 1875 by Willard H. Smith, a lawyer in St. Louis. It was continued three years and then expired. Subsequently it was revived by D. McArthur (formerly connected with the Trade Journal), who is its present publisher; F.H. Bacon is editor. The Railway Register is published weekly, and is devoted to railway, manufacturing, and kindred image location
St. Louis Railway World 1876- 1877 In 1876, H.D. O’Brien commenced the publication of the St. Louis Railway World, a journal specially devoted to the interests of railway employees. One year after its first issue he sold out to a similar publication in St. Louis. (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois by Brink, McDonough & Co. 1881).          image location
St. Louis Real Estate Bulletin Building News 1879- 1919? Official organ – St. Louis Real Estate Exchange. David I. Zucker, editor. Var.: Real Estate Bulletin and Building News. image location
St. Louis Record 1870- 1884? A journal of select reading matter and reliable news” A.N. Kellogg Newspaper Company. image location
St. Louis Referendum 1902 ​Political organ of the Public Ownership Party. Var.: Referendum. image location
St. Louis Register 1821- 1957 Catholic.  Name changed to St. Louis Review. William Orr, publisher image location
St. Louis Rehabber 1981- 1984 St. Louis Rehabber            Many St. Louisans remember the St. Louis Rehabber, the precursor of St. Louis Home, which ultimately was bought out by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and became an insert in a limited number of its zones.             The Rehabber had a heart. It was socially responsible. It was concerned with the underlying ills of urban living.             Commercially, image location
St. Louis Reporter and General Advertiser 1851 Commercial weekly published by J.E. Courtney. image location
St. Louis Republic 1888- 1919 History of the St. Louis Republic – Established 1808 Early in 1808 Joseph Charless arrived at St. Louis by keelboat from Ohio. He gave out the information that the first printing press to be set up west of the Mississippi was on the way from Pennsylvania and that type had been shipped from Louisville. As he went about the image location
St. Louis Republican 1873- 1876 S.Innes StoneBy W.A. Kelsoe             Mrs. S. Innes Stone was the Missouri Republican’s first society editor and the paper’s first woman reporter regularly employed as a member of the local department. Other women had written poems and short stories for the Sunday edition professionally, receiving pay for them…Mrs. Stone, a native of Virginia, at the time of which I speak, image location
St. Louis Republican 2 1940 Earl G. Bohnenkamp, Editor/Manager. Monthly. Possibly only one issue. FOREWORD: "We, the publishers of the St. Louis Republican, believe that too much has been said about billions and too little about dollars and cents. The purpose of this publication is to bring home to Mr. Citizen the fact that, regardless of his earning power, he contributes daily in the image location
The St. Louis Review 1957- Archdiocese of St. Louis, publisher. image location
St. Louis Saturday Night 1920- 1921 Independent weekly. “Only news that is helpful; only advertising that is truthful.” A publication for the Women’s Chamber of Commerce of St. Louis in the interest of all St. Louis women. image location
St. Louis Seasons 1997- 2009 Free quarterly magazine for luxury living. Indian Paintbrush, Inc. image location
St. Louis Semi-Weekly Globe 1878- ? William McKee and Daniel Houser, publishers. image location
St. Louis Sentinel 1968- ? Howard Woods, founder. His wife Jane became the publisher upon his death in 1976. This Is Our Pledge  We are delighted to introduce to you this first issue of the ST. LOUIS SENTINEL. We have come into the St. Louis market with but one objective - to serve, with vigor, the many fine citizens who live here. We are image location
St. Louis Show World 1936- 1937 Weekly entertainment paper. Cinema Publishing Company, Charles E. Kurtzman, president. image location
St. Louis Small Business Monthly 1988- Founded by Katie Muchnick and Bill Schneider. Judy Meador bought it in 1991 and became editor/publisher. image location
St. Louis Sportsman 1881 The St. Louis Sportsman made its appearance in July, 1881. Captain C.W. Bellairs, well known in sporting circles, was its editor. It was a weekly. It was suspended in October of that same year. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). The first attempt to establish an exclusively sporting journal in St. Louis was made in image location
St. Louis Sportsman & Amateur Athlete 1901- 1908 Var: Sportsman image location
St. Louis Spotlight 1944?- 1948 George Ross, managing editor; Danny Hadzick, editor. Var.: Spotlight image location
St. Louis Stadium Fan 1969 Published monthly by Stadium Fan Incorporated. Robert Reim, publisher/ Glennon Jamboretz, editor. image location
St. Louis Standard 1874- Semi-monthly. Van Beek, Barnard and Tinsley, publishers. Var.: Saint Louis Standard. image location
The St. Louis Star 1895- 1932 First owner was Nathan Frank. Changed name to St. Louis Star and Chronicle in 1905 after purchasing the Chronicle. Sold Chronicle to E.G. Lewis in 1908 and returned name to St. Louis Star. Front page was printed on green paper. In 1913, John Roberts, a founder of the Roberts, Johnson and Rand Shoe Company, bought the Star. Upon his image location
St. Louis Star 1960- ? Weekly image location
St. Louis Star and Chronicle 1905- 1908 Var: St. Louis Star-Chronicle image location
St. Louis Star Sayings 1887 “The Sunday Sayings,” Started in 1884, Was the Foundation Stone on Which The Star Grew In 1884 a printer and a reporter started a gossipy Sunday paper and called it The Sunday Sayings. Thus was born The St. Louis Star. Charles E. Meade, the reporter, became editor. Charles A. Gitchell, the printer, was also business manager. A Kansas City image location
St. Louis Star-Chronicle 1903- 1908 Var: St. Louis Star and Chronicle image location
The St. Louis Star-Times 1932- 1951 Initially called Star and Times. the Paper moved to 12th and Delmar in 1934. Owner Elzey Roberts sold it to the Post-Dispatch and publication ceased June 15, 1951 (See announcement below), with publisher Elzey Roberts stating that the paper couldn’t maintain itself any longer. An Announcement            The Star-Times announces with regret that this is the last day of publication. The year image location
St. Louis State Journal 1861 Joseph W. Tucker, editor. Suppressed during Civil War by General Nathaniel Lyon. Editor Tucker was arraigned for treason.            image location
St. Louis State Times 1868 C.B. Wilkinson image location
St. Louis Striker 1877 Var.: Saint Louis Striker image location
St. Louis Style Baseball 1989- Joe May, publisher; Bob Agne, editor.  image location
St. Louis Sun 1989- 1990 The St. Louis Sun Rises—-and Sets By Susan Fadem Windows not speckled by grime. Offices without clutter. And an editor-in-chief, Ralph Ingersoll II, whom we would later read that Fortune magazine named one of the 25 Most Fascinating Business People in the year 2000. He actually had a man modify the nibs, or tips, of his fountain pens. Pinch image location
St. Louis Sun 1845 The St. Louis Sun was started in St. Louis in 1845 by A.W. Scaritt. It appears to have had a brief existence, for a year later we find that the St. Louis Sun had been started to advertise the owner's "sugar-coated pills." (From the History of St. Louis City and County by John Thomas Scharf, 1883). image location
St. Louis Sunday Sayings 1884- 1888 “The Sunday Sayings,” Started in 1884, Was the Foundation Stone on Which The Star Grew In 1884 a printer and a reporter started a gossipy Sunday paper and called it The Sunday Sayings. Thus was born The St. Louis Star. Charles E. Meade, the reporter, became editor. Charles A. Gitchell, the printer, was also business manager. A Kansas City image location
St. Louis Sunday Tidings 1890 William Marion Reedy and M.A. Fanning, founders. image location
St. Louis Tageblatt 1888- 1898 (“St. Louis Daily Paper”) Adolph Hepner, editor; St. Louis Working Men’s Publication Association. Var: Tageblatt image location
St. Louis Tages-Chronik 1851- 1863 In 1851, Franz Saler established Tages-Chronik (“Daily Chronicle”), a two-cent morning paper, with a bias in favor of Catholicism. Among its early editors was Anton Boeckling; later (in 1858) the name of Adelbert Loehr appeared as editor. Tages-Chronik lasted some twelve years, when Mr. Saler sold the advertising patronage to Carl Daenzer, of the new Anzeiger des Westens, and image location
St. Louis Telephone 1877- 1884 A monthly amateur journal devoted to literature, education, society, journalism and every subject that may prove of interest to its readers. Var.: The Telephone image location
The St. Louis Times 1829- 1832 Rev. E.P. Lovejoy, the abolition martyr who was killed by a mob in Alton in 1836, was attached to the first St. Louis Times as an editorial writer, but withdrew in 1831 [another source says 1832]...The Times, started in 1829 by Stone and Miller, lasted until 1832. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri edited by Howard L. Conard, 1901). Founded by Jacob image location
St. Louis Times 1850- 1852 In 1850, a second St. Louis Times made its appearance, edited by Judge Walker, formerly of the New Orleans Delta. A.H. Buckner, Walter B. Foster and John Loughborough, at different short periods, occupied the editorial chair. Finally, it was absorbed by the Union. (From the Encyclopedia  of the History of Missouri edited by Howard L. Conard, 1901). Another paper appeared April 3, 1850, under the image location
The St. Louis Times 1866- 1878, 1880 Founders were Stilson Hutchins, D.A. Mahony and John Hodnett. A later investor, Henry Ewing, provided impetus for the paper’s success, but an ideological falling out in 1872 allowed Ewing to buy out Hutchins’ interest. The continued success of the paper was marred when Ewing died and his interest was sold to a group of investors, including Estell McHenry, George image location
The St. Louis Times 1879- 1881 St. Louis Times Company. J.H.R. Cundiff, publisher. Daily. image location
The St. Louis Times 1895- 1932 Daily English-language paper published by WestlichePost/Anzeiger des Westens. Front page was printed on pink paper. Merged with St. Louis Star. image location
The St. Louis Times 1978- 1979 ​Strike paper image location
St. Louis Times 1994- St.Louis Times Targets Elderly With Blandness By E.S. Evans             The St. Louis Times, a…monthly labeled “Timely News for Mature Minds, Bodies and Spirits” is an idea – perhaps a bright business idea, but how good a read it is remains to be seen as it ages.             “I’ve been told that it’s a good thing that I’m a image location
St. Louis Times-Journal 1878- 1880 Daily. B.M. Chambers, editor. Merged with St. Louis Times. Var: Times-Journal image location
St. Louis Today 1973 Strike newspaper published three days a week. Harper Barnes, editor; William Woo, business manager; Eric Friedman, publisher. image location
St. Louis Today 1973- 1975 Arts paper published bi-weekly founded by Paul A. Camp. image location
St. Louis Trade Journal 1872- ? “A Record of Commerce and Manufactures. Devoted to the Interests of the St. Louis Board of Trade” E.F. Hobart and Company, publishers. image location
St. Louis Transcript 1844?- ? The only record of the St. Louis Transcript, a penny paper, is a notice in the New Era of February 24, 1844. It stated that the first issue had appeared the day before under the direction of [Ephrian] Abbott and [Thomas] Mann. The paper professed to be independent in politics with its only object that of doing good. How image location
St. Louis Tribune 1880- 1898? On the 6th of September, 1880, the St. Louis Tribune was established. Its proprietors were William Kaufmann, of the Anzeiger...Emil Paetow, assistant editor, of the same paper, and Otto Hilpert, traveling agent of the Westliche Post. Hilpert was selected as business manager... The first editor was Ferdinand Harrsler, previously the local editor of Amerika, but Fritz Gloganer succeeded him image location
St. Louis Tribune 1838 The first of quite a succession of Tribunes appeared July 11, 1838. The Whigs, wanting a campaign paper, sent for Frederick Kretschmar, a capable journalist, and promised him money and support for a journal in their interest. Neither money nor support, however, was forthcoming, and after the election, when publication of the paper ceased, Kretschmar was compelled to pay image location
The St. Louis Turner 1891- 1892? St. Louis Turnverein newsletter. Was originally named Gut Heil. image location
The St. Louis Union 1846- 1852 W.H. Brown, editor.  L. Pickering sold the paper to R. Phillips, who eventually sold his ownership to William McKee and associates. Var: St. Louis Morning Union, St. Louis Daily Union Squatter; In 1848, the St. Louis Evening Union (Phillips); Also in 1848, the St. Louis Weekly Union (Pickering). image location
The St. Louis Union 1880- 1884? In the latter part of 1880 an association of workingmen known as the Co-operative Printing Company established The Union, a weekly journal devoted to trades-unionism and the elevation of the laboring classes. It was a five-column quarto, and attained a respectable circulation, but did not pay, and near the end of 1881 was sold under mortgage. The new owners image location
St. Louis Volksblatt 1855- 1857 Rev. C. Diehlmann, editor. Var.: Volksblatt, St. Louiser Volksblatt image location
St. Louis Weekly American 1854 Mallett, Willis and Covert, publishers. image location
St. Louis Weekly Dry Goods and Grocery Reporter 1872 The paper was established in 1872 by H.F. Zider...It is issued weekly, and is a publication of one hundred and twenty-eight pages. Its peculiarity is the quoting of actual market values (jobbers' prices) of dry goods and groceries. It is claimed by Mr. Zider to be in a very flourishing condition. There are only two other similar publications in image location
St. Louis Weekly Globe 1878- ? William McKee and Daniel Houser, publishers. image location
St. Louis Weekly Herald image location
St. Louis Weekly Times 1877? St. Louis Times Company. image location
St. Louis Woman 1971- Shirley Brown, publisher/general manager. image location
St. Louis World 1902- 1918 The St. Louis World, the newest of our daily papers, is an exponent of liberal progressive ideas and gives special attention to local news and events of the sporting world. Its editor, Alfred Spink, has been connected with the St. Louis press for a quarter of a century and has always been regarded as an authority on matters of image location
St. Louis Yeoman Courier 1919- 1921 Devoted to the interests and upbuilding of yeomanry in St. Louis, Missouri and vicinity. Benjamin Wolf, editor. Published monthly by Kable Brothers Company in the interests of the Brotherhood of American Yeomen in St. Louis, Mo., and vicinity, by permission of the Grand Foreman. image location
St. Louisan 1936? A Gregory R. Lucy publication. Society, entertainment, fashion. image location
St. Louisan 1941- 1950; 1958 Liberal journal. image location
St. Louisan 1969- 1975 Libby Ferguson, publisher. Name changed to St. Louis Magazine. image location
St. Louiser Abendzeitung 1867- 1868 (“Evening News”) Daily. Heinrich Binder, editor; Moritz Niedner, publisher. Merged with Neue Welt. image location
St. Louiser Volksblatt 1855- 1857 (“Peoples Paper”) image location
St. Louisi Hirlap 1913 Hungarian paper. International Publishing Company. Var.: Hirlap image location
St. Louiske Listy 1902?- 1923? Bohemian. ​Var: Listy image location
Staats-Zeitung ?- 1876 The Staats-Zeitung, established by Gustav Bruere, absorbed the money-losing Die Neue Welt. Ernest Schierenberg became editor, but money losses finally forced the subsequent sale of the paper. It was purchased by Joseph Pulitzer in 1876. He published it for one day and then sold its Associated Press franchise to the Globe for $20,000. image location
Stamp Collector's Companion 1891- 1892 Stamp Collector's Publishing Company. F. H. Littlefield, editor. image location
Standard 1880 A.S. Mitchell, editor. image location
Standard-News 1926- 1928? Edgar G. Brown, editor; Standard News Publishing Company image location
The Star of Egypt 1858- 1859 In the winter of 1858-9, a campaign paper was started in Belleville by a stock company composed of gentlemen of avowed allegiance to the Buchanan wing of the Democratic party. Bearing the name of The Star of Egypt, it was edited and published by ex-Gov. John Reynolds and J.E. Hughes. It did good service as a campaign paper, but image location
Star of the West 1822- 1823 The Star of the West was the second candidate for journalistic favors in Madison county, and the fourth paper published in the state. In August, 1822, Mr. Miller and son, natives of Pennsylvania, came west seeking a location to establish a printing office. They brought a press and type with them. They stopped in Edwardsville, and here were induced image location
Star Sayings 1884- 1888 John Magner, editor. Became Evening Star Sayings. image location
Star-Republican 1879- 1882 Originally the St. Louis County Republican The first offices of the Star-Republican were located on the basement room of the Court House building [in Clayton] in the middle of the public square…It met with favor from Democrats and Republicans alike. The county government was then in the hands of Democratic appointees of Governor Phelps, with the exception of Christian D. image location
The State's Duty 1895 The State's Duty, W.H. Moore, editor, and T.P. Rixey, associate editor, a thirty-two page monthly, is devoted to advocating good roads, good government, public improvements and better social conditions. It believes that the development of internal improvements "will quiet the spirit of anarchy and social unrest" in the land. It has no purely literary articles. The first number was issued image location
States 1868 image location
Statesman 1847? Possibly only one issue. image location
Statesman 1925- 1927 Monthly. John L. Talbott, editor/publisher. National Currency and Employment League. image location
Steam Coal Buyer 1924- 1932 Published monthly in the interest of the large users of coal and coke. Arthur M. Hall, editor. image location
Sterling Magazine 1911- ? Monthly literary magazine. Western Magazine Publishing Company. image location
Stern des Westens 1866- 1877 Stern Des Westens            After the offices were moved to Belleville, ownership passed from Schmall into the possession of Semmelroth and Kircher on May 15, 1866, then Kircher sold to Daniel Hertel, who was editor. Subsequently Hertel retired from the paper, and Semmelroth became sole proprietor. Henry Huhn had editorial charge from 1868 to 1872, when the paper was sold to image location
StL Business Magazine 2013 "Andrew Lloyd Weber calls his company The Really Useful Theatre Company. My aspiration is to create a magazine that is really useful for our readers, for finding solutions and resources for addressing needs they have every day." Todd Abrams, editor/publisher image location
Stoves and Hardware Reporter 1883- 1913 The paper was established in 1875 as the "house organ" of the Excelsior Manufacturing Company. [It] was purchased in 1879 by Frederick Hower. It is published semi-monthly, and is devoted to the interests of the stove and hardware trades. (From the History of St. Louis City and County by John Thomas Scharf, 1883). image location
Straight Up 2006- 2019 Monthly entertainment magazine "serving up art, music,  and culture for the Metro-East's enjoyment.". Became Gesso. image location
Suburban Home Journal 1889- 1909? Semi-monthly. Suburban Printing and Publishing Company. Became St. Louis Home Journal. image location
The Suburban Leader 1894- 1898? Formerly The Leader. “Devoted to the Interests of St. Louis County and the Suburbs of St. Louis.” W.M. Harford, proprietor. image location
Suburban Leader 1885?- 1894? Weekly published in Kirkwood. Cortez A. Kitchen, editor. image location
Suburban News 1901?- ? Webster Groves  J.J. Wilson, Jr., managing editor. image location
Suburban Review 1947- 1952 image location
The Sucker 1840- 1843 The Sucker was established in Alton January 5, 1840. It was published by Messrs. Parks & Beatty and edited by "Ourselves," who were understood to be William S. and John Lincoln, sons of Levi Lincoln, Governor of Massachusetts and Juinius Hall. On 21st March of the same year (some reports say Oct. 31, 1840) it was merged with the image location
Sucker Life Boat 1855 Comic paper in Alton, founded by J.T. Beem, Martin Brooks and Wilbur Ware. image location
Sulamith 1880?- 1881? Jewish, German language monthly. Solomon H. Sonnenschein and Moritz Spitz, editors/publishers image location
Suncrest Call 2001?- 2002? Deborah Baker, publisher. image location
Sunday Herald 1865 On the 27th of May, 1865, the Sunday Herald was established in  East St. Louis by James L. Faucett. It was issued on Saturday, though named a Sunday paper. (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois by Brink, McDonough & Co. 1881). image location
Sunday Journal 1936- ? image location
Sunday Mirror 1891- 1920 Var: Reedy's Mirror, Mirror, St. Louis Mirror. Began as a gossip sheet with little reputation for believability.   The Sunday Mirror is now [Dec. 1893] practically in exclusive control of the weekly press. The Mirror differs in its make-up and character from any other western publication. It knows neither friend no foe in its columns, and is original and image location
Sunday Morning 1872- 1873 South St. Louis weekly. image location
Sunday Morning World 1873 The Sunday Morning World, William R. Cranna, manager, was begun in November, 1873, and lived through a few numbers only. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
Sunday Sayings 1884- 1887 C.E. Meade, managing editor. Var.: St. Louis Sunday Sayings.  image location
Sunday School Evangelist 1875- 1896 Weekly published by Christian Publishing Company. image location
Sunday Telegraph 1909- 1913? C.M. Hanaway, editor; St. Louis Sunday Telegraph Publishing Company. image location
Sunday Watchman 1888- 1933 A Catholic journal devoted to the interests of the Catholic church in the West. Rev. D.S. Phelan, editor/publisher.  image location
surFace 1989- 1991 image location
Swashbucklers 1980 Publication focusing on comic art. Don Secrease, Paul Daly and Rick Burchett, publishers; Jean Secrease, editor. image location
The Tablet 1907- 1912 “An independent newspaper that will print the news.” Motto: “Progress and publicity”The Tablet, a weekly published in Kirkwood, presents a workmanlike appearance and provides a superior class of reading matter.(Originally published in the History of St. Louis County by William L. Thomas, 1911). Var: Kirkwood Tablet image location
Tages–Chronik 1849- 1861 In 1851, Franz Saler established Tages-Chronik (“Daily Chronicle”), a two-cent morning paper, with a bias in favor of Catholicism. Among its early editors was Anton Boeckling; later (in 1858) the name of Adelbert Loehr appeared as editor. Tages-Chronik lasted some twelve years, when Mr. Saler sold the advertising patronage to Carl Daenzer, of the new Anzeiger des Westens, and image location
Taglicher Anzeiger des Westens image location
Take Five 1987- 2003 Take Five Set Out to Offer Positive NewsBy Tom Wraussmann             Five years ago [1987], Sylvester Brown, Jr. felt that the St. Louis black community should be served by a magazine that took a deeper, more positive look at the issues that concern African-Americans.             The result: Take Five, a magazine, says Brown, Jr., publisher and editor-in-chief, that focuses on image location
The Taper 1840 A short-lived Alton paper published by Rev. Thomas Lippincott. image location
Taste image location
Tavern Journal 1935- 1948 A.Bayou, managing editor; H.T. Davis, editor. Weekly image location
Tax-Payer 1915- 1917 Martin Shanghnessy, editor. image location
The Teacher and Western Educational Magazine 1853- 1854 John H. Tice, editor (Supt. of the St. Louis Public Schools). Lasted one year. image location
Teen Sceen 1966- 1968 Teen Sceen Publications, William Baker, Publisher; M.D. Davis, Managing Editor image location
Temperance Banner 1873- 1875 Founded in Alton in August, 1873, the Banner was edited by R. Smiley and published by Eugene Smith. Its name indicated its mission. It continued until 1875, then suspended. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois by W.R. Brink & Co. 1882).   image location
Temperance Battery 1852 Rev. J.D. Snow, publisher. Became Missouri Cascade. image location
Tennis Press 1974- 1980 Carol Jablonow, Vicki Levitt, publishers. image location
Terrain 2017 Bi-monthly. Published by Ripple Custom Media, a division of Waterways Journal, Inc. image location
Therapeutic Review 1912- 1914 Quarterly. Dr. D. Applebury, editor. image location
This Week in Country and Western Music 1972- ? Weekly. Norman McLain, publisher; Herbert McLain, editor. image location
The Times 1830?- 1897? image location
The Times 1866- 1878 Merged with the St. Louis Times in 1878. image location
The Times 1958- 1960 Florissant image location
The Times of Skinker DeBaliviere “The oldest neighborhood newspaper in St. Louis” “Independent and all volunteer-run since 1970.”  West End Publishing image location
Times West 1981? Weekly. Times Publications. Carol Jablonow and Vicki Levitt, publishers. image location
The Times-Journal 1878- 1880 image location
Tocsin 1840 Whig party image location
Together 1960?- 1970? Methodist image location
Town & Style 2011- Weekly. Dorothy Weiner, editor-in-chief; Lauren Rechan, publisher. image location
Town Talk 1923- 1960 Ferguson. Merged with the Florissant Reporter. image location
TPA Travelers Magazine 1905- Official monthly publication of the Travelers Protective Association of America. image location
Trade Journal 1872- ? image location
Trade Journal 1876- ? image location
Trade Review 1876- ? Weekly. Geo. S. Monroe, editor; Commercial Publishing Company. image location
The Translator 1837- 1838 Weekly family and literary paper. image location
Traveler 1861- 1896 Monthly magazine of travel, history, art, science, literature and general current topics. J. DeLyon Howth, publisher. image location
Treu-Bund 1873- 1875 The publication of Der Treu-Bund, a German paper, in the interests of a benevolent society, was begun October 18, 1873. The Messrs. Semmelroth were its publishers; Doctor Neubert was its editor. (From the History of St. Clair County, Illinois by Brink, McDonough & Co. 1881). image location
The Tri-City Labor Herald 1906- ? Published in East St. Louis image location
Tri-County Journal 1970 ​       image location
Tribune 1869- 1871 Fr. Kretschmar, editor/publisher. Var:  St. Louis Tribune.  image location
Tribune 1875 Published in East St. Louis image location
True American 1890- 1897 American Protective Association. Anti-Catholic weekly. H.G. Beedle, editor. image location
True Democrat 1895 image location
True Shepherd and Cascade 1855 Temperance publication. J. Gilman and L. Mills, publishers. Name changed to The Sentinel. image location
True Shepherd of the Valley and St. Louis Know-Nothing 1854 In 1854, Rev. Dr. J.H. High and J. Gilman, LL.D., bought the Shepherd of the Valley and changed its editorial make-up, turning it into an organ for the "Know-Nothing Party" and changing the name to The True Shepherd of the Valley and St. Louis Know-Nothing. image location
Truth 1888- 1897 Drama and society paper. image location
The Truth 1874- 1896 Monthly religious paper published by Charles B. Cox. image location
The Truthteller 1898- 1899 Weekly publication opposed to department stores. image location
TV Preview 1951-1953 Weekly. Armen G. Kayarian, editor/publisher. image location
TV Review 1951- 1953 Weekly television program listings. Roscoe Turner, publisher, The Scene Publishing Co. image location
U.S. Women 1995- ? Making the most of our lives. Noreen Flaherty, publisher image location
The Union 1846- 1864 Established by Barton Able, John How, Frank Blair, O.D. Finley and others. Later renamed The Dispatch. image location
Union and Confederate Annals 1884 Confederate Annals, devoted to the history of the Civil War, was begun by J.W. Cunningham in June, 1883. In January, 1884, its name was changed to Union and Confederate Annals. It contained eighty pages. Three or four numbers were issued. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). The magazine is the child image location
Union Banner 1849- 1850 Temperance paper. image location
The Union Labor Advocate 1934?- 1937 1937   Founded by Maury Rubin. Changed name to Labor Tribune in 1937.  “A Courageous Constructive Champion of Organized Labor.” Advocate Press. Var.: St. Louis Union Labor Advocate. image location
Union Stockyard Journal 1901? Devoted to the live stock interests of St. Louis, Mo. James MacCallum, publisher. image location
Universal Magazine 1907 Hale Publishing Company "The Universal Magazine will be a twenty-five-cent publication - that is, 25 cents a year. It will be published monthly. We intend to submit to our readers a good, clean, interesting, instructive publication. We will probably issue a large number of copies but we do not expect to publish a "give-away" paper. We will publish some image location
The Universe 1882- 1885 The Universe, I.E. Diekenga, editor and proprietor, made its appearance in the latter part of 1882, and was discontinued in June, 1885. It contained thirty-two to forty pages of "popular" literature, original and selected, and illustrated with ordinary woodcuts. The architectural department was under charge of J.B. Legg. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, image location
University City Journal 1934 Combined with News in 1934 image location
University City News 1934 image location
University City Tribune 1939?- 1956? Weekly. Jack Samuel, editor; Alexander Sonnenschein, publisher. image location
Unser Blatt 1872- 1873 (“Our Paper”) W. Staengel, editor image location
Unser Blatt 1898? (“Our Paper”) G.H. Thoussen, editor/publisher image location
Unsere Zeit 1850- 1851 (“Our Age”) Franz Andreas Heinrich Schneider, editor/publisher. image location
Upper Alton Herald 1887 image location
Vagabond alternative image location
Valley Farmer 1849- 1853 The Valley Farmer was issued as a monthly by Pickering, Penn & Co., in 1848. K. Gates and Ephraim Abbott were its editors. It was a quarto sheet of twenty pages. In 1853 it was bought by Honorable Norman T. Colman, who changed its name to Colman's Rural World and issued it weekly. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. image location
The Valley Magazine 1902- 1904 William Marion Reedy, publisher. Literary magazine. image location
The Valley of the Mississippi 1841- 1842 The Valley of the Mississippi, illustrated in a series of views, was a monthly published by J.C. Wild, an artist. The illustrations consisted of views of historical buildings, cities, sites, streams, etc., accompanied by appropriate descriptions from the pen of Lewis Foulke Thomas. Each number contained four full-page lithographic views or illustrations. The first number bore date of July, 1841, and image location
Valley Park Dispatch 1903- 1904 image location
Valley Park Messenger 1911?- 1924 image location
Valley Park Sun 1906- 1917 Ryan and Company, proprietors. The Sun is a newspaper gotten up by a newspaper man in a fine newspaper town. We sized up the man by reading his paper, and the town the first time we ever saw it. The Sun is a seven-column folio, issued weekly by Editor-Manager T.E. Ryan. It is five years old, nearly as old as image location
Valley Reporter 1950 Harry G. Evans, editor/publisher. Var.: Florissant Valley Reporter image location
Vanguard 1882- 1913 A paper of this name was established by the Revs. Sherman and Ellis in July, 1881, somewhere in Illinois, where these gentlemen were conducting a series of "holiness" meetings. For several months it was published in a tent with which they wandered about that State, and in October of 1881, it settled at Quincy, Ill., and in April, 1882, image location
Verein Deutscher Arzte 1916- 1918 image location
Viewpoint Magazine 1986 Room For Two Gay Papers, Publisher Says            After a difficult birth, Viewpoint Magazine, a new publication serving the gay community, is looking ahead to a healthy infancy.            “I’m the sixth editor in fourteen issues,” said Thomas Long. “Ive made a commitment to stabilizing the magazine. It’s my full-time job.”             Long was a cable TV producer before signing on image location
The Vigilante 1865 Upper Alton image location
Vital Voice 2000- 2020 New Paper Comes Out of the Closet By Holly Rauch             What the now defunct Gay News Telegraph  (GNT) didn’t have was money and marketing. But former GNT editor Jim Thomas has filled those voids and is back at his typewriter – this time as editor if the Vital Voice, a new bi-monthly newspaper serving the St. Louis gay image location
Vivant 1933? ​     image location
The Voice of Illinois 1838 Published by the Whig Executive Committee of Madison County. Publication ceased following the election. image location
Voice of Liberty 1941 Official organ to aid in the establishment of the Missouri Liberal Party. J.G. Parkinson, editor. image location
Volksblatt 1855- 1857; 1875 Rev. C. Diehlmann, editor. Var.: St. Louis Volksblatt, St. Louiser Volksblatt image location
Volksstimme des Westens 1877- 1880 Volksstimme des Westens (“Public Opinion”) was started in 1877 by a literary association of the Socialist Labor Party, Germans. Dr. A. Otto Walster was editor-in-chief, and it was the recognized social organ of the Socialists in the West. It lived two or three years. (From the History of St. Louis City and County by John Thomas Scharf, 1883.) This image location
Volkszeitung 1866- 1869 W. Von Schirach, editor; Volks-Zeitung Publishing Company. Merged with Die Neue Welt. image location
Vorwarts 1852- 1854 The first German newspaper printed in Madison county was established in Alton in 1852 by P. Stibolt and V. Walter. It was in form a five column folio, well printed and ably edited. It was Democratic in politics and supported the measures advocated by the then rising statesman, Stephen A. Douglas. In 1854 the firm was dissolved, and Mr. image location
Vorwarts 1845- 1846 (“Onward”) Heinrich Koch, editor/publisher. image location
Vox Populi 1894 Populist weekly. image location
Walrus Said 1979 A new St. Louis-based "little" magazine called The Walrus Said made its debut here in July. Edited and published by Edward James Berry, a St. Louisan "with a lifelong interest in writing and literature," the magazine's 28-page first issue contains poetry, short fiction, book reviews, photographs, political commentary and excerpts from a booklet called "Personal Reflections on A China Trip." image location
Ware’s Valley Monthly 1875- 1878 Ware's Valley Monthly was first publiished by Charles E. Ware & Co. The first number appeared in May, 1875. It was edited by the Rev. William M. Leftwich, and was devoted to literature, religion, history and general miscellany...In 1875 it passed into the hands of a stock company composed of Honorable Samuel T. Glover, Charles E. Ware, Judge Edward A. image location
Watchman Advocate 1881- ? Frederick Essen, president; J.N. Barnes, editor. image location
The Watchman-Advocate 1903- ? Former St. Louis County Watchman. George J. Santner, publisher. image location
Waterways Journal 1887- ? Waterways Journal – One of St. Louis’ Oldest PublicationsBy Don Corrigan             While John Shoulberg calls the land-locked St. Louis suburb of Rock Hill his home, his thoughts are never very far away from the muddy waters of Old Man River.             That’s because Shoulberg is editor of the weekly “Riverman’s Bible,” otherwise known as the Waterways Journal. When Shoulberg image location
Webster Advertiser 1954- 1971? Jack Thiess, publisher; John McCormick, editor. Var.: Webster Groves Advertiser image location
Webster and Kirkwood News 1899- ? James J. Wilson, Jr., prop. image location
Webster Gazette 1922- ? ​      image location
Webster Groves Advertiser 1954- 1971? Jack Thiess, publisher; John McCormick, editor. Var.: Webster Advertiser. image location
Webster Groves Messenger 1923- 1931 “Devoted to the Interests of the Fastest growing Section in Missouri” image location
Webster Groves News ​This paper was recently [1911] established and is published by Kriegsman & Thursby. It is an organ of the independent voters’ party. It is printed in St. Louis and furnishes its readers with four pages of home news out of the eight pages it prints. (Originally published in the History of St. Louis County by William L. Thomas, 1911).   image location
Webster Groves Record 1889- 1890 image location
Webster Groves Times 1879- 1895, 1896- 1899, 1910- 1914 1914 Sam Hodgdon. Proprietor; W.W. Austin, editor. This is a bright, well-edited, readable paper. It is managed by Sam. D. Hodgdon, trustee, a man well and favorably known in the county. The publication office is at 106 Pacific avenue, Webster Groves. The paper is Independent Republican, is the mouthpiece of the Citizens’ party, is a seven-column folio, homeprint, with 1,200 image location
Webster Leader 1905- 1977 “The Official Paper of Webster and Vicinity”  E.R. Holsinger, editor; J.R. Holsinger, publisher. image location
Webster News 1910- 1914 Merged with the Times in 1914. image location
Webster News Leader 1905? image location
Webster News-Times 1910- 1961 “Published in the interest of Webster Groves and St. Louis County.” Webster Printing and Stationery Company. G.W. Kriegesman, editor. Acquired by the Advertiser. image location
The Webster Times 1896?- ? ​      image location
The Webster Times 1978- 1979 image location
The Webster-Kirkwood Times 1979- image location
The Weekly 1985? By David P. Garino Co-publishers Carol Jablonow and Vicki Levitt feel – with noticeable verve – that they’ve recently added two cogs that will propel their St. Louis Weekly to bigger and better heights. The “cogs” are new employees: editor Jeff Bredenberg and director of marketing and sales Ian Cohen, who joined the newspaper in February and March, respectively. image location
Weekly Belleville Advocate 1844?- 1858 The Belleville Advocate            This paper was, with but few slight intermissions, regularly issued from its first number on March 27th, 1840. It is credited with being the first “permanent” newspaper in St. Clair County. James L. Boyd and John T.C. Clark were the first editors and publishers. It was printed in a building on the corner of Main and High image location
The Weekly Courier 1903? Published at Kirkwood Station. Steven J. Harris, editor and business manager. image location
Weekly Courier 1880 The Weekly Courier was a six column folio campaign paper, published in Collinsville by J.N. Peers and edited by William A. Garasche. It supported Hancock for the presidency. It suspended a week before the election. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois by W.R. Brink & Co. 1882). image location
Weekly Democrat 1858- ? Belleville image location
Weekly Dispatch 1873 Wangelin Bros., publishers. image location
Weekly Fountain 1849 The Weekly Fountain, edited by Benjamin Hayes and H.I. Vance, appeared in 1849. It measured 18 x 23 1/2 inches and contained a total of twenty-eight columns. It was published every Saturday; it was devoted to temperance, morals, literature, commerce, agriculture, manufactures, general news, mechanics, and the arts. It survived long enough to cross the middle of the century. image location
Weekly Globe-Democrat 1896- 1926 The Globe's publication mailed to rural and outlying areas. image location
The Weekly Hesperian 1867 The Weekly Hesperian was the first reasonable attempt made to publish a purely literary paper in St. Louis. It was issued in the regular five-column, eight-page form. The first number appeared January 5, 1867, and the last April 20th of that same year. James W. Allen was its proprietor, and Professor John L. Tracy its editor and principal contributor...Unlike the majority image location
Weekly Hotel News 1881- 1884 The Weekly Hotel News was begin in November, 1881, by A.J. Pierce. It was an eight-page weekly. It lived three or four years. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
The Weekly Madison Press 1858 Published in Edwardsville image location
The Weekly Mail 1877- 1878 Phillip H. Thomas, managing editor.  “Official Paper of St. Louis County”  Weekly Mail Company. Kirkwood. Var.: Mail “The first newspaper in St. Louis County after the Separation [City/County] was called the Weekly Mail and its first issue was dated January 31, 1877. It antedated the St. Louis County News just two days. The Weekly Mail’s salutatory was written by image location
The Weekly Missouri Republican 1850 Chambers and Knapp image location
The Weekly News Democrat 1857?- 1884? Belleville image location
Weekly Republican 1870- James D. McClain, publisher, Maryville. image location
Weekly Reveille 1844- 1850 In December, 1844 the Reveille suffered a real loss in the death of Mat Field. He died at sea on a voyage from New York to New Orleans, taken as an attempt to cure his failing health.Upon his death his brother wrote and printed the following: "Our brother and best friend, Matthew, - 'Mat', as all delighted to call image location
Weekly Signal 1882 H.D. O’Brien, editor/publisher. East St. Louis. Var:. Signal image location
Weekly St. Louis Evening News 1859 Charles G. Ramsey & Company image location
Weekly St. Louis Evening News and Intelligencer 1857 Charles G. Ramsey & Company. image location
Weekly St. Louis Intelligencer 1854?- ​“By A.S. Mitchell & Co.” image location
The Weekly St. Louis Pilot 1854- 1856 “Devoted to Politics, Literature, and General Intelligence”  M. Niedner & Company. image location
The Wellston Journal 1935- 1964? Joseph Daniel Heade, editor; A.M. Donnelly, publisher. Name changed to St. Louis County Journal. image location
The Wellston Local 1917?- 1935 “A Strong County and City Advertiser and the Home Paper That Brings All the Home News Into Your Home” Became the Wellston Journal. image location
The West 1870 The West, a three-column thirty-two page monthly, was issued by Hamlin & Co., in September, 1870. Mrs. Ellen M. Mitchell was its editor. Its articles, as well as its illustrations, were nearly all selected from the English periodicals. It suspended some time during the winter of the same year. Mrs. Mitchell was known principally through the nom-de-plume of "Ella Ellwood." image location
The West at Work 1917- 1919 “A non-technical journal of finance and industry of the Mississippi Valley,” Paul W. Brown, editor/publisher. Renamed America at Work. image location
West Citizen Journal 1965 Anne Blackman, editor; Dennis W. Shea, publisher. image location
West Countian ?- 1996 The owners of the West Countian shut down the paper’s operations in April of 1996. The closure, due to financial difficulties, ended the ongoing efforts of publisher Karen Bidzinski to keep the paper operational in the face of increasing financial pressures. At the time, the paper had a direct mail circulation of 100,000 and a staff of 15 A image location
West County Journal 1965- ? Frank C. Bick, publisher. image location
West End News 1905 A West End paper devoted exclusively to West End interests and West End news. W.W. March, publisher. image location
West End Word 1972- Founded by Ellie Chapman, Sun Smith-Foret, Robert Duffy and Jack Lowell. There were several ownership changes in the decade of the 1980s, from a group headed by Suzanne Goell to Ellen Cusumano and Steve Trampe in 1986, then to Jeff Fister in 1989. image location
West Florissant News 1931?- ? E. Huneke, publisher. image location
West Newsmagazine 1996- ? Doug Huber, owner; Susan Sagarro, managing editor.  Bi-weekly. image location
West St. Louis 1895- 1897? Was merged with two other papers into the St. Louis News. image location
West Town Advertiser 1955 image location
The Western 1872- 1881 The Western Educational Review was launched in 1866, by Professor O.H. Fethers, the elocutionist; it was printed by E.F. Hobart & Co., who bought it in 1872. Its name was shortly changed to The Western, and after a temporary suspension it reappeared under the editorship of Professor Horace H. Morgan, principal of the high school, and was published by image location
The Western Argus An outgrowth of The Workingman’s Advocate. It went through a series of owners: Mansfield, Lawhead, Corbin, Watson, Davis, Col. Gilpin, and Shadrach Penn. He changed the name to The Missouri Reporter. image location
Western Atlas and Saturday Evening Gazette 1839- 1842 D.L. Holbrook & Company. image location
The Western Banner 1858- 1861 Established by B. Dorian Killian. St. Louis Archbishop Peter Kenrick gave him $3,000 to make it a Catholic newspaper. Essays and poetry. B.D. Killian, editor/publisher. image location
Western Barmah 1861 Weekly image location
Western Boatman 1849 A periodical devoted to navigation, by D. Embree. image location
Western Boy 1877 Monthly. C.S. Smith, J.N. Gettys, editors/publishers. image location
Western Celt 1870- 1874 “Only Irish national newspaper between New York & San Francisco.” Dan O’Madigan, editor.  image location
Western Commercial Gazette 1869- 1871 N.M. Sheffield and K.H. Stone, publishers. Merged to form St. Louis Commercial Gazette. image location
Western Commercial Traveler 1880- 1885? The Western Commercial Traveler was established in February, 1880, by S.H. Shoyster, proprietor and editor, as a monthly commercial travelers' paper. In July, 1882, it appeared as a weekly, with a list of contributors comprising some of the best known and most popular writers in the country. Besides being the organ of commercial travelers, it has a decidedly literary image location
Western Cumberland Presbyterian 1862- 1874 No. 1 of Vol. 1 was issued June, 1862, at Alton. It was intended to supply a demand occasioned by the sale and removal of the St. Louis Observer to the east, leaving all the northwest part of the church without an organ to properly represent them. It was devoted to religion, morality, church information and religious news generally. image location
Western Educational Review 1866- 1872 The Western Educational Review was launched in 1866, by Professor O.H. Fethers, the elocutionist; it was printed by E.F. Hobart & Co., who bought it in 1872. Its name was shortly changed to The Western, and after a temporary suspension it reappeared under the editorship of Professor Horace H. Morgan, principal of the high school, and was published by a stock company. image location
Western Emigrant 1816- 1818 Colonel [Charles] Keemle’s newspaper connections began on the Emigrant. That was the paper which under the name of the Western Journal was started in 1815 on a fund of $1,000 raised by citizens who wanted to fight Colonel Charless’ Gazette. Keemle was a Philadelphian. He was only seventeen years old when he came to St. Louis but he had image location
The Western Examiner 1833- 1834 First issue came out November 19, 1833. Introduced as a monthly January 1, 1834. Became bi-monthly. "To the Reader: We must apologize for the lack of editorial and other original matter in this week's Examiner. For several weeks past, duties of a pressing nature have so engrossed the attention of the almost only individual who, for several months, has image location
Western Home Press 1860 Weekly. R.V. Kennedy, T.M. Halpin & James Peckham, editors. image location
The Western Homeopathic Obsherver 1863- 1871 In November, 1863, The Western Homeopathic Observer, H.C.G. Luyties, publisher, made its first appearance. Its editors were, for the first three numbers, Dr. William Todd Helmuthand E.C. Franklin; after that Dr. Helmuth alone. The Observer suspended publication in January, 1871. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri edited by Howard L. Conard, 1901). image location
Western Insurance Review 1869- 1931 The Western Insurance Review, a monthly journal, was founded in 1869 by Captain H.L. Aldrich, and is devoted exclusively to the cause of sound insurance. It covers the Western and Southern field, and has a high standing among insurance publications.  (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
Western Journal 1815- 1816 In the spring of 1815, an opposition paper to the Missouri Gazette was founded. With an investment of $1,000 a press and type were bought. Joshua Norvell, from Nashville, was engaged to run the organ, which was named the Western Journal. The backers were soon called upon to put up more money. The name was changed to the Western Emigrant. (From St. Louis, image location
Western Journal 1848- 1851 The Western Journal was begun in January, 1848, by M. Tarver and T.F. Risk. It was a monthly devoted to agriculture, manufactures, mechanical arts, commerce and general literature. The design of the publishers was to lay before the people of the Mississippi Valley "that class of facts and information which relates to the varied pursuits of the people." It originally contained image location
Western Journal and Civilian 1851- 1856 In the early years of its publication the first railroad lines connecting St. Louis with the outer world were being planned and built, so a large portion of the Journal's pages were devoted to railroad news and statistics. Mrs. Mary B. Hall, of Iowa, contributed articles on general literature to its pages; George B. Davidson, of Illinois, on agriculture in image location
Western Junior 1902- 1904? “Published in the interest of the Junior Order United American Mechanics and Daughters of America.” J.C. Hainer, editor and manager. image location
Western Life 1872 Western Life, Mrs. Annie Anderson, editor and publisher, was devoted to spiritualism. It materialized weekly during a few months in 1872. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
The Western Literary Emporium 1848- 1849 The Western Literary Emporium was published monthly; it was devoted to "sound literature, morality, the diffusion of useful knowledge, and the elevation of man." A.H. Ernst, Governor Robb, Rev. A.A. Lipscomb. Rev. Henry Smith, D.D., J.R. Barnes and Rev. John C. Lord, D.D., were its principal contributors. It was published by Stowell & Langley until the seventh number, when J.M. Stowell image location
The Western Live-Stock Journal 1879- 1881? The first number was issued in July, 1879, by H.D. O’Brien, publisher, and Y.M. Langdon, editor. These gentlemen continued in partnership until July, 1880, when Langdon purchased O’Brien’s interest, and  was the sole proprietor of the Journal until Jan. 1st, 1881, when he sold out to S.J.E. Rawling. It was a seven-column folio, later becoming a five-column folio with image location
Western Messenger 1917- Negro paper moved to St. Louis from Jefferson City. Was known for its fights against segregation on the local level. image location
Western Mirror and Ladies’ Literary Gazette 1838- 1840 The paper was established at Edwardsville by James Ruggles in May, 1938. He was editor and proprietor. The Mirror was devoted to the introduction and propagation of a universal language by which the whole human family could hold converse with one another and be understood. It was a worthy mission, but the feeble effort of its progenitor fell stillborn. image location
Western Mirror, Literary and Political Gazette 1838- 1840 See Western Mirror and Ladies' Political Gazette. Var.: Western Weekly Mirror image location
The Western News 1827- 1828 It appears that the first newspaper ever published in St. Clair County was called the Western News. This was published by Dr. Joseph Green in Belleville, and appeared for the first time in the winter of 1827-28. It was a small sheet of nondescript character. Nominally it was a weekly; really it was issued only occasionally. (From the History image location
Western Pioneer and Baptist Standard Bearer 1836- 1839 In 1836, the operation of the Pioneer was moved from Rock Spring in St. Clair County to Alton, and the first number of the Western Pioneer and Baptist Standard Bearer issued Sept. 14, 1836. It was edited by Rev. John M. Peck, E. Rogers and Rev. Washington Leverett. With the commencement of the 24 volume the words "Baptist Standard image location
Western Ploughboy 1830- 1831 Judge John York Sawyer had established the Western Ploughboy in Edwardsville November 1, 1830, and continued the publication one year, when he came into possession of the Advocate, and the two papers were consolidated under the name of the Illinois Advocate. (From The History of Madison County, Illinois, by W.R. Brink & Co., 1882). image location
Western Register 1849 A weekly summary of commerce, navigation, science and the arts. L. Pickering & Company, publisher. Printing plant destroyed in great fire. image location
The Western Review 1852 T.F. Risk & Thomas E. Garrett, editors/publishers.   It was a monthly, devoted to general literature, the science of government, social and political progress, the sciences, and the ornamental and useful arts. Only a few numbers were issued. Became Miscellany and Review image location
Western Sporting Life 1881- 1882 B.W. Alexander was proprietor, Captain C.W. Bellairs, editor, and Gwynne Price, field editor. In the fall of 1882 it was discontinued...Western Sporting Life was the ablest paper of its class ever published in St. Louis. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). The first attempt to establish an exclusively sporting journal in St. Louis was image location
Western Star 1878- 1881 Miss Flora Hawthorne, editor. image location
Western Sun 1825? The Western Sun, established at Belleville  (according to one report in December, 1825, and according to another, in the winter of 1827-28) by Dr. Joseph Green, appears to have been the first paper published in St. Clair County. (From the Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois edited by Newton Bateman and Paul Selby, 1907). image location
Western Trade Journal 1867- 1882 In 1867 William Bell began the publication of The Western Trade Journal, a weekly, devoted to commercial, agricultural and other interests. It passed into the hands of the Chambers Publishing Company less than two years later, and George W. Briggs became its editor. It was discontinued in the latter part of the [eighteen] eighties. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by image location
The Western Watchman 1849- 1933 The Western Watchman was established in 1865 (We have found copies from 1849 - ed.) by Rev. D.S. Phelan, a priest of the Catholic Church at Medina, Mo. The "Drake Constitution," then in force, prescribed a "test oath" for clergymen, and Mr. Phelan, refusing to take the oath, was imprisoned. The Western Watchman was started to agitate for a image location
Western Weekly Mirror 1838- 1840 See Western Mirror and Ladies' Literary Gazette Var.: Western Mirror, Literary and Political Gazette image location
The Westliche Post 1857- 1938 The Westliche Post was a paper which had to be reckoned with as a great national force in the years following the Civil war. Probably it was for years the most profitable German newspaper property in the country. Just before the war Carl Daenzer and Dr. Wetzel issued the first number of the Westliche Post. Mr. Daenzer withdrew from image location
Wetmore’s Weekly 1904- 1905 A journal advocating equitable legislation for all. Claude H. Wetmore image location
What’s Up? 2002- ? Magazine sold by the homeless.  Founder Jay Swoboda. image location
The Whip 1885- 1886 The Whip was cracked for the first time on February 14, 1885, and it applied its partisan lash in the fall of 1886. It was published by an association of which L.T.W. Wall was president and F.H. Ertel, secretary.  (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). image location
Whip and Spur 1929- 1931 An illustrated journal recording the social activities of fashionable St. Louisans in town and country. image location
Whittaker's Magazine 1870- 1873? Charles Whittaker established in October, 1870. Sold to F.J. Gilmore in 1871. Name changed to St. Louis Illustrated Magazine. image location
The Winner 1899- 1902 Monthly published by Mail Order Publishing Company. E.G. Lewis, editor.  Edward Gardner Lewis and Howard Nichols listed as publishers. Renamed The Woman’s Magazine. image location
Woche 1891- 1895 (“Week”) German family magazine. Adalbert Schaller, editor; Wm. G. Reitz Publishing Company. image location
Wochen-Chronik 1861 image location
Wochenblatt der Amerika 1874- 1886 German language, Catholic. German Literary Society of America. Anton Hellmich, publisher. image location
Wolfs-Augen 1900 (“Look of the Wolf”) Weekly. image location
Woman’s Farm Journal 1890- 1910 Monthly featuring short articles with large circulation in Western states.  Frank J. Cabot, editor/publisher.  E.G. Lewis Publications image location
Woman’s Home Monthly 1866 H.M. Brockstedt, editor/publisher. image location
The Woman’s Magazine St. Louis 1899- 1910 Lewis Publishing. Var: Woman’s Magazine. The Lewis Publishing Company of University City has one of the costliest  and most complete printing plants in the Union and has become widely known  through the enormous circulation to which its Woman’s Magazine and other woman’s publications have attained. (Originally published in the History of St. Louis County by William L. Thomas in image location
Woman’s National Daily 1906- 1911 Not a newspaper of St. Louis but a newspaper from St. Louis was the Woman’s National Daily in its genesis. It was started by Edward G. Lewis, the founder of the Woman’s Magazine and of the Woman’s Farm Journal, two monthly publications of large circulation. The want of a daily newspaper, which Mr. Lewis felt, was scattered along 40,000 rural image location
Woman’s National Weekly 1911- 1916? E.G. Lewis, editor. image location
Woman’s Voice 1991- ? Marielen Parrish, editor. Monthly. image location
Women’s Voice 1991- image location
Wood River Daily Press 1933- 1945 image location
Wood River Journal 1920- 1957 image location
Woods & Irons 2010- 2011 Official Voice of the Gateway PGA Foundation. William Mathis, publisher; Ellie Jones, editor. image location
Word and Works 1883- 1919 Although not primarily a religious journal, Word and Works is distinctively such in tone and can not be properly classified except among non-sectarian religious publications..,[Editor] Rev. Irl R. Hicks [uses the paper] as an exponent of his theories and observations on meteorological conditions and probabilities. (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri edited by Howard L. Conard, 1902). “Prove all things. Hold image location
Workers' Democracy 1981- 1986? Don Fitz, editor; Mary Fechner, Tim Mills, assistant editors. image location
The Workingman’s Advocate 1831- ? Begun by John Steele, but sold to James B. Bowen and Wakefield, who changed the name to The Western Argus (one report Missouri Argus). image location
The World 1902- 1918 A.H. Spink, editor/publisher. Var: St. Louis World. image location
World Call 1919-1973 A monthly published for the United Christian Missionary Society. image location
World of the Blind 1916 The only periodical published in America by sightless people. image location
X---tra 1995- ? Founded by Cathy Sims, S. Townsend and Martha Greene. image location
Xanadu 1969 Alternative/underground. Pete Rothschild, editor image location
Ye Olde Towne Crier 1932- 1933 Community publication serving Webster Groves area. image location
Zeitung 1848- 1849 In 1848 Anton Eickhoff issued a German semi-weekly, Die St. Louis Zeitung. Eickhoff was a literary student who began writing for the press when sixteen years of age. He was born in Westphalia, Germany, and came to St. Louis in January, 1848.  (From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri by Alexander N. De Menil, 1901). In 1848, Anton Eickhoff established Die image location
Zeuge der Wahrheit 1904- 1909? (“Witness of the Truth”) G. Gosswein, editor. image location
Zum Feierabend 1874? (“Leisure Time”) Semi-monthly. Rev, Adolf Baltzer, editor. image location